Series 16a
Record Sub-Series Name: 
CMC - George Masa Papers
 

Physical Location:  Box 16a

Record Series Value (High, Medium, Low):  Estimated as High

BIOGRAPHICAL DETAILS:
George Masa (1882 - 1933)

We know very little about George Masa's early life, but through the efforts of many who have been enthralled by the "Mystery of George Masa,"** we are learning more each year.  What we do know is that George Masa was born in Japan in 1882.  His Japanese name was Masahara Iisuka and after the death of his father he came to the United States to study at the University of California (Berkeley ?).  He held a degree from Tokyo-College, where he graduated with high honors. When his father died he came to California to seek a degree in engineering. Apparently he was successful in securing the University of California degree in engineering, as he is next recorded as employed as an engineer in Colorado.  While employed in Colorado, he was recruited by Fred Seely to come to work at the Grove Park Inn which had just opened in Asheville. 

Upon arrival in Asheville, Masa joined the Carolina Mountain Club where he took many extensive mountain tours with the group and became enchanted by the scenic beauty of the area.  Just where he learned photography is not fully known, but while under the employee of the Grove Park Inn,  Masa became a very proficient photographer.  He would have had many photographers to learn from in Asheville, as the City Directory of 1915 lists multiple studios in operation in the city. 

Masa is recorded as an employee of the Plateau Studio which had previously been under the ownership of Herbert Pelton.  Just how this transition to ownership took place is not known, but his work is often labeled Plateau Studio and the sequence of numbering on the plates and negatives from that studio can give the researcher some indication of the breadth of Masa's work, though most of his photographs are not signed.

On many of Masa's journeys through the mountains, he photographed the flora and scenic views of the Blue Ridge Mountains, as well as the Great Smoky Mountains.  He was also engaged in mapping the region and some of his maps are included in the images in this collection. Some of his treks into the mountains were singular adventures, but others were with friends from the Carolina Mountain Club and with his close Bryson City friend, author, Horace Kephart.  Kephart's book, Our Southern Highlanders was a popular work with many who wished to learn about western North Carolina.  The two friends were instrumental in raising the awareness of the beauty of the region and its people. Through their efforts, national attention was drawn to the area and the efforts to create the Great Smoky Mountains National Park owes much to both George Masa, as well as Horace Kephart. One work in particular was important to the effort to create the Park, and that was the book of compiled by Masa of photographs of the Great Smoky Mountains area that was given to President Coolidge's wife who was a frequent visitor to the Grove Park Inn and who was known to have great affection for the area.

George Masa was a charter member of the Carolina Mountain Club and many of his friends have left tributes to him and to his work with the Club in this record. He left valuable records (not included in this collection) of the nomenclature, the topography and the mineralogy of the mountains in western North Carolina and in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The documents by Masa included here show his careful and dedicated work at preserving the region he came to love. 

Horace Kephart, Masa's close friend died in a tragic automobile accident in 1931.  Masa's health declined following the death of his friend and in 1933, Masa died from complications associated with tuberculosis and influenza. Many of the documents in this collection are concerned with the naming of the 6000 foot peak in the Great Smoky Mountains, for George Masa.  The mountain called, "Masa Knob," sits close to another important peak in the mountain chain, that named "Mount Kephart."  The two mountain peaks join the close friends forever in the geography of western North Carolina. 

Record Series Description: 

Folder Item Description Thumbnail
1 *  *  * Trail notes of George Masa [12 items]

*  *  *  *  *

  01
masa001a

October 18, 1931
TABLEROCK and CHIMNEY MOUNTAIN

Left Federal Building at 7:20 a. m., and took a wandering route to point of beginning, but the correct routing is as follows:

Take N. C. 10 to Morganton, N. C. Here take N. C. 181 to a point where highway makes large curve, crossing steel bridge over a creek. Here make a direct turn to the left after crossing the bridge onto a county road, and proceed, to Tablerock, North Carolina. After passing the postoffice at Tablerock, take the first road turning to the left, proceeding to a point where a delapidated [sic], unoccupied house stands on right of the road on small hill. Here a very small roadway turns sharply to the right. On the left of this road is a large white house, situated some distance back from the highway. Proceed along this small road through a barnyard, through pasture gates, then through bars, and park cars at open grassy spot where road continues straight ahead, but where old sledge road turns off to left up steep slope.

The hikers, starting at 10:30, took this old sledge road which proved to be a rather steep trail as it neared the summit of the Chimney Mountain. This trail tops out on the lower side of the Mountain, from which point there is a particularly nice view of Shortoff and a section of the Linville Gorge.

Distance to this point, 4 miles.

Following along top of this Mountain, the trail drops to go along under crest on the brink of the chasm, and this section of trail is interesting because of its many and varied rock formations. At 1:15, lunch was eaten at a grassy spot overlooking the Gorge. This mountain unique by reason of the perfect chimney standing off the Gorge side, views of which can be seen from this point and from Tablerock. From this spot, we walked 1.2 miles to the gap between the two mountains. Here is a small forest cabin. Continuing on the trail straight ahead, we reached the summit of Tablerock at 2:40, a distance of 5/10ths of a mile from the gap, and a total walking distance from the parked cars of 5.7 miles. (Note: By parking the cars at the point outlined above, the total walking distance will be shortened.)

From summit of Tablerock could be seen Lake James,

Short Off, Chimney Mountain with its Chimney, Grandfather Mountain Hawksbill, Gingercake, and far in the distance the Blacks, while directly below us was the Linville Gorge.

Page 01

  masa001b

Returning to the Gap from Tablerock, we took the trail which turns off the ridge trail to the left (coming from Tablerock), and proceeded down this trail a distance of 1.5 miles to point where a trail turns off to the left to a spring. Distance from main trail to the spring is about 120 yards. The trail continues down ridge and then follows Tablerock Creek., to point of parked cars. Distance by this route to the cars was also 5.7 miles from the summitt [sic] of Tablerock.

Number of hikers: 21.

Jewell King, Leader
Mrs. George Stephens
Jane Oakley
Roger Morrow
Margaret Stoughton
Janet Nihlean
Miss Lola Wood
J. B King
Barbara Ambler
John Wilmot
Goerge [sic] Masa
L. B.. Rogers
Marion Rogers
Louise Rogers
Dr. O. C. Barker
Walter Watts
Julia Nevercell
Margaret Allen
Hugo Strongmiller
Miss Beck
Sue Latimer, Rear Guard.

Page 02
  02
masa002a

22 November 1931
THE RICHLAND BALSAM

An all day hike best suited to the seasoned hiker.

The Richland Balsam rises to the height of 6540 feet, just a 150 feet less than Mt. Mitchell, and is closely associated with a dozen peaks of 6000 feet or over.

Leaving Asheville (6:15AM) follow N. C. #10 west 34 miles to Hazelwood, which is two miles beyond Waynesville; turn left at Allen Creek, over good dirt road four miles to Quinland (3000 feet elevation).  Park cars (7:45AM).

Hike road east about three-fourths mile; cross Allen Creek and enter gate to the right onto the Waynesville watershed.  Follow little used road about 200 yards, turn sharply to the left straight up ridge, over an old trail to top of ridge.  Here you encounter wire fence, which is the boundary of the watershed.  Follow fence up snaggy ridge to summit.  Approximately two hours and four miles have been consumed (9:45AM).

Both trail and and fence turn to right and approach Cold Spring Knob (6010ft) less than a mile away.  From this knob a splendid view of Pisgah, Pigeon River Valley and surrounding mountains may be had (10:15AM).

Continue to follow spring SSW into Double Spring Gap, where water can be had by passing over...

Page 01
  masa002b

...fence onto the watershed a distance of 200 yards.

Keep following fence just as long as the trail stays with fence.  Then the trail leads south to crest of ridge (11:45AM).  More perfect views.  Follow ridge thru small gap and onto the Richland (12:30PM).  Lunch and feast your eyes.  Unobstructed views from here are limited only by the elements.  You may see the Mt. Mitchell range, Cowee mountains, Blue Ridge beyond Franklin, much of the Smoky Mountains, ect. [sic]

To complete the circle, do not follow ridge leading NW as trail there has been obliterated, but drop down to the western side of this ridge until a splendid trail  is encountered.  Good water crosses trail.  Follow trail NW by Lone Bald and on to Cany [sic] Fork Bald, which is about one and a half hours from Richland Balsam.  As you approach Cany [sic] Fork, views of the beautiful Cowee range may be had.  Follow fence to gate, passing thru continue straight ahead in a northerly direction.  This trail leads down for four miles to cars.  We arrived at five o'clock.

Some dozen and a half grouse, a snipe, bear signs, ravens, large hawks and small birds were observed along the way.

This hike in many respects remind [sic] one of the Smoky Mountains.

Page 02
  masa002c

Fifteen hikers including four ladies made the trip on Nov. 22, 1931.  O. C. Barker, leader.

Ambler, Barbara
Barker, O. C.
Davis, Frank
Jones, Allmond
King, Jewell
Loftin, R. A. - visitor
Masa, Geo.
Morrow, R. V.
Nihlean, Janette
Rogers, L. D.
Rogers, Louise
Rogers, Marion
Stephens, Geo.
Underhill, Sidney - visitor
Wilmot, John

Page 03
  masa002d

[Map]  THE RICHLAND BALSAM
Nov. 22, 1931
O. C. Barker, leader

Page 04
  03
masa003a

THE PINK BEDS CABIN

A jaunt to the top of Big Pisgah; a hike from the cabin to the Yellow Stone Falls; also a partial description of the cabin.

From the Federal Building, on Saturday, Jan. 2nd at 2:27 P.M. we motored out over N. C. #10 west ten miles, turned left on paved road, crossing overhead railroad bridge, leading to Candler (1.2 miles).  200 yards past the Candler post office, turn left over Hominy Creek, continuing on paved Pisgah road.  About sixteen miles from Asheville the paved road gives way to a good dirt road.  At 18.6 miles turn left, fording small stream and thru Pisgah entrance gate.  Passed by Buffalo and Elk Pasture at 23.4 miles.  At 25.7 miles turn right into spur for parking, from where you may hike to the top of Big Pisgah some mile and a quarter away.  Returning to car re-enter road and continue straight ahead.  At 27.7 miles we passed the Pisgah National Forest Inn (open season, June 1st to Oct. 1st).  Pass Frying Pan Gap at 28.8 miles.  This is an ideal camping ground and a good spring of water about 200 yards down western slope.  Next, Wagon Road Gap at 31.5 miles.  Located here is the Raven's Nest Inn.  Turn left on N. C. #284.  Reached Pink Beds Guard Station...

Page 01
  masa003b

...at 5:15 P.M. 36 miles from Asheville.  Proceed one tenth mile, turn right thru gate (which must be unlocked by ranger), onto Headwaters road.  Five tenths mile further turn right to cabin, 200 yards off Headwaters road.

Next morning we proceeded down Headwaters road about one and a half miles to Case Ridge Gap where we parked cars to right.

At 9:10 A.M. we started our hike west up Case Ridge Trail two miles to Cherry Gap, on top of the Pisgah Ridge, where we were joined by five other hikers at 10:05 A.M., who came from Asheville that morning.  They parked at Wagon Road Gap and hiked three and a half miles to Cherry Gap, leaving car at 8:15 o'clock.

A cold spring of water is situated on the east side of Cherry Gap down some 300 yards and just below the Case Ridge Trail.  It is the source of Little Loggy Branch.

Hike south west from Cherry Gap over Pisgah Ridge Trail nearly two miles.  Pass over Seniard Mountain and continue one half mile  where trail to  falls turn to the right from the Pisgah Ridge Trail.  However, we continued on Pisgah Ridge Trail about one fifth mile to a rock sheltered camp sight for lunch.  Water may be had a hundred yards further along trail.

Page 02
  masa003c

Returning to falls trail, we traveled downward about three fourths mile to Pigeon River.  On the way down we could see a waterfall about a quarter of a mile up stream, but Yellow Stone Falls were just below where trail comes to river.  Do not cross river but find trail leading downstream thru rhododendron to below falls.  Here you may cross over on log where a good view of the falls may be had.

Jan. 2nd and 3rd, 1932.  O. C. Barker, leader.

Hikers
Bramlett, Wayne
Barker, O. C.
King, Jewell
Massa [sic], Geo.
Morrow, R. V.
Morrow, R. H. of Brevard
Nihlean, Janette
Rogers, L. D.
Stephens, Geo.
Strongmiller, Hugo

Page 03
  masa003d

THE CABIN

The club's newly acquired cabin, situated in the Pink Beds which is 36 miles from Asheville and ten miles beyond Big Pisgah is ideally located for the uses of the club.  Many desirable hikes may be had from the cabin.

The cabin has a large room downstairs with fireplace, a spacious kitchen, with oil range, some cooking utensils and china.  Upstairs there are two bedrooms.  The furniture consists of eight cots, several chairs, dining and kitchen tables.

The house was built many years ago by the Vanderbilt Estate.  The cabin, while old, is still a substantial building.  Some improvements are necessary and steps toward this end is [sic] already being taken.

Page 04
  masa003e

[Map]  THE CLUB'S PINK BEDS CABIN

Page 05
  04
masa004a

CAROLINA MOUNTAIN CLUB
TRIP REPORT

Trip Name: Cold Mountain        Date: 3/20/32

Mileage of round trip: By car 66 miles; Afoot 10 miles.        [Measured] By Pedo

Time required: By car 1 1/2 hours one way; Afoot 3 1/2 hours one way; (Total) 5 hours.

Departure: From Asheville 8:00 (A.M); From car 9:35 (A.M).
Arrival:  At car 5:30 (P.M); At Asheville 7 (P.M).

Members: 12        Visitors: 1

Trip Register: 
LEADER, L. D. Rogers
[?]
Lydia Beck
H. Carpenter
R. V. Morrow
G. S. [?]
John Wilmot
Dorthy Collins
Jim Atkins
Marion Rogers
George Masa
C & M [?]

Motor Log: (Asheville to point of leaving car)
0 - miles - Lv Federal Building take N. C. #10
18 - " - Canton, NC transfer to N. C. #110
24.3 - " - Junction NC 110 & NC 284
               Transfer to 284
32.2 - " - Cold Creek Bridge lv 284 and take
               small narrow country road to
               right stop at 2nd house at left
32.6 - " - 2nd house at left - park cars.

Trail Log: Will be finished by Mr. George Masa who has all the details.

Page 01
  masa004b

Cold Mtn.        March 20th.        All Day.

Leader, L. D Rogers, Telephone 9076.

Cold Mountain is slightly over 6000 Ft. and is southwest of Asheville. Leave Arcade Bldg. and follow N.C. #10 to Canton, N.C. From Canton, N.C. follow N.C. 110 to junction of N.C. #284 at 24.3 miles, follow N.C. 284 to Gold Greek Bridge at 32.2 miles. Turn in right to dirt road, about 1/4 mile park car. Automobile distance round trip is 66 miles, walking distance about 12 miles.

Cold Mountain is in shape of horse shoe with the heels resting on the road N.C. 284 and the peak at the top of horse shoe. We will start up the Southern ridge, follow to the peak, have lunch, then down the Northern ridge to cars. This will afford views of a lot of other peaks we have visited, Pisgah Ledge, Seniard Ridge, Richland Balsam Cold Springs Knob, (Lickstone Bald) Shining Rock, Plotts Balsams and over to the Smokies.

If any one wants to know why the name of Cold Mountain after the trip they will have no trouble finding the answer.

Leave Federal Bldg. 8 A.M. Take Lunch and Canteen and warm clothing. Return to Asheville, about 6.30 P.M.

[signed]         
L. D. Rogers

Page 02
  masa004c [Maps and notes]

 

Page 03
  05
masa005

CAROLINA MOUNTAIN CLUB
TRIP REPORT

Trip Name: Mitchell Falls        Date: March 27, 1932

Mileage of round trip: By car 99.7 miles; Afoot 4.8 miles.        [Measured] By Pedo

Time required: By car 2 hours one way; Afoot 4 hours.

Departure: From Asheville 8:15 (A.M); From car 10:15 (A.M), reach Fall 12:00.
Arrival:  At car 2:30 (P.M); At Asheville 6:00 (P.M).

Members:        Visitors:

Trip Register: 
LEADER, George Masa
Jewel King
Lydia Beck
Dorothy Collin
L. D. Roger
Barbara Ambler
Sue Lattimar
O. C. Barker
Marion Roger
Margret Allen
Julia Nevercel
Roger Morrow

Motor Log: (Asheville to point of leaving car)
Leaving Arcade Bldg. follows N.C. 20 - 69, at 6.3 N. C. 20 turn to left, follow N.C. 69 thru Weaverville at 9.3m.  At 13.9 junction N.C. 695 turn to right follow N.C. 695, at 20.5 m. Barnardsville, at 30.35 Little Cane River Gap on county line, at 35.9 m. highway sharp turn to left, make right turn leave highway follow dirt road at 38.5 m. Wilson's toll gate, follow Motor Road, at 39.2 leave motor road, turn in left at 39.6 m. parked car.

Return: - 0.0 Wilson's toll gate, at 2.6m. junction #695, follows highway at 3.9 m Pensacola, at 6.2 m Dixon P.O. right, at 13.65 m. junction #69 turn to left, follows #69, at 14.3 m. Burnsville, at 25.9 Ivy Gap, at 38.1 County line Big Ivy, at 40.6 junction #695, at 54.9 Asheville.
Note: Highway 695 not recommend [sic] wet or rainy day.

Trail Log:
Parking place at 0.0 m.  at 0.3 one trail at right, go straight following logging railroad grade, at 0.4 m. cross Oges Creek, at 0.52 railroad grade turn to right, at 0.72 old shack at left, at 1.0 m. cross Timber Creek, trail quite steep going up, not so well beaten, watch blazed marks on trees, at 1.73 cross Branch, at 1.94 cross Branch again, at 2.4 Mitchell Falls.  Big Poplar Tree - from Parking place cross Sugar Camp Creek about 1/4 m.  Datas obtained from Appalachian Forest Experiment Station as following; -
Circumference at breast height on the contour            25.3 ft.
Height to point where broken off                             105.0 ft.
Total height                                                             132.0 ft.
Height to forks                                                          75.0 ft

Comparing to Reems Creek Big Poplar.
Circumference at breast height on the contour            28.7 ft.
Total height                                                             144.0 ft.

  06
masa006a

CAROLINA MOUNTAIN CLUB
TRIP REPORT

Trip Name: Grandfather Mountain from Linville Gap       Date: May 14-15, 1932

Mileage of round trip: By car 191 miles; Afoot 10.4 miles.        [Measured] By Pedo, G. Masa

Time required: By car 3 hours one way; Afoot 8 hours.

Departure: From Asheville 2:45 Sat.pm; From car 7:10 Sun.am
Arrival:  At car 3:30 Sun.pm; At Asheville 7:30 Sun.pm.

Members: 11        Visitors: None.

Trip Register: 
LEADER, Janet Nihlean
C. A. Abell
Margaret Abell
O. C. Barker
Jewell King
George Masa
Sue Latimer
Janet Nihlean
L. D. Rogers
S. Weizenblatt
Leonard Rapport
Roger Morrow

Motor Log: (Asheville to point of leaving car)
Follow #69 out Merrimon Avenue through Weaverville, Burnsville, Spruce Pine, and Cranberry.  Turn left when #69 strikes #194 about 82.5 miles out, then right on #194 half a mile further.  At Banners Elk, 90.1 from Asheville, turn right on the second gravel road, (the first leads to Lees McRae School)  This road becomes a dirt road.  Turn left before concrete bridge, 90.8, take right fork, 91.3, see school on left and creek on right at 91.7, take left fork 92.0, see small road on left at 93.0, see house on right and small road on left at 93.2.  The road is rocky from here on and may be skiddy.  Top of gap 94.0, cross old rails 94.2, again 94.4, reach lumber camp 95.1, in Linville Gap.  Ask man in house back to left if ok to camp here in fenced field over by trees.  Facing Grandfather Mountain, you have a fine view of his rugged peaks.

Trail Log:
Leaving camp, follow road to platform and piles of logs.  Turn right, .27.  Follow plank road, road forks, take right, 1.43.  Road forks again, take right fork, 2.1.  Shack and spring on left, 2.43.  At sawdust pile, leave plank road and climb up rocky washout on mountain 2.73.  Climb over big rocks to reach first top, 3.4.  Follow path out ridge and come to second top 4.0.  Drop back to first top, but before reaching it, down down path to left which will take you around the second top and through a beautiful wood.  Climb up a huge pile of rocks to top of third peak, from which you can see the farther side peak which we climbed before from the Linville side.  These rocks are covered with sand myrtle.  Down to the south from the second top, you will see Table Rock and Hawksbill.  All the way on this trip, we saw many wild flowers, especially huge purple trilliums, and heard and saw a great variety of birds.  No animals nor snakes.  Coming down from the rocky top, we proceeded on up the plank road.  Up above a large shavings pile, we found a spring which maintains a...

Page 01
  masa006b ...10 degree temperature the whole year round, so they claim.  It was good water, anyway.  Further on up the plank road, we saw ahead to the left a rock pillar, on the outer face of which was carved the authentic profile of Grandfather, and a smaller one of Grandmother.  This profile was not as good as those we saw outlined above us while climbing up the plank road toward Grandfather Mountain.  There we saw a fine one of George Washington, and one huge negro's face, also others.  We saw a large raven circling around above the cliff, in which it evidently had its nest.

Coming back down the plank road, we took a path leading down to the right below the shaving pile, shortcutting across the plank road down the mountain.  We did not follow this path to its end, as we were afraid it would lead us below our camp, so we took the plank road to camp, our path striking the road just above some small but pretty falls.

About 2.2 miles past Minneapolis, before you reach Cranberry, there is a little rocky road up to the right from #69.  On our way home, Chuck and Margaret took us up this road a little way and showed us a beautiful wooded hills where we found many wild flowers - wild delphinium, orchids, trilliums, etc.

Page 02
  07
masa007a

CAROLINA MOUNTAIN CLUB
TRIP REPORT

Trip Name: Great Smoky Mountains National Park       Date: May 28-30, 1932
                  Bradley Fork - Richland Mtn. - State Line
                  Bradley Fork - State Line - Hughes Ridge

Mileage of round trip: By car 159 miles; Afoot 16.88-17.4 miles.        [Measured] By Pedo

Time required: By car 3 hours one way; Afoot 12 hours (total), Arrived camp 5:50 P.M.

Departure: From Asheville 2:45 P.M.; From car 6:45 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Arrival:  At car 7:00 - 7:15 P.M.; At Asheville 10:45 P.M.

Members: 7        Visitors: 7

Trip Register: 
LEADER, George Masa
Jewell E. King
Janet Nihlean
Marion Roger
Edna R. Carr
Mrs. H. Strongmiller
H. Strongmiller
H[?] Pettey
James Williams
O. C. Barker
J. W. [?]
Wm. Beale
L. D. Rogers
R. V. Morrow

Motor Log: (Asheville to point of leaving car)
Leaving Federal Building at 0.0 m. follows Highway N.C. No.10 to west, junction N.C. 112 at 61.6 m. turn to right follows N.C. 112 to Cherokee, junction N.C. 107 at 67.6 m. turn to right follow N.C. 107 to Smokemont, at 74.7 m.; in Smokemont N.C. 107 turn to left cross bridge but go straight ahead; at 75.0 road forks take right follow Bradley Fork, road narrow, after cross Chasteen Creek road forks at 76.8 m. there is gate at left road and road at right can drive about 1/2 m. where Hughes Ridge Trail starts.  Through the gate (get key from National Park Service lodge at Bryson City) follow Bradley Fork.  At 77.7 cross bridge, at 79.1 cross bridge again, at 79.45 end of road.

Trail Log: Sunday May 29 - Bradley Fork - Richland Mountain - State Line.
Leave camp at 6:45 A.M. at 0.0; follows railroad grade, at 0.27 m.  Long Ridge Trail at right; at 0.3 m. Log bridge; at 0.35 just this side of Tenn. Branch leave railroad grade turn to left follow trail; at 0.5 m. cross branch; 0.62 cross twin branches; 0.8 m. cross branch; 1.12 m. cross branch; 1.35 m. cross branch; this is last water, fill canteen; at 1.85 top of ridge old trail comes up at right, turn to left about 15 feet above B.M. 3963-4 at right; at 1.95 B.M. 4157 on tree at right; at 2.5 m. B.M. 4574 at left; at 3.0 m. old camped ground at right, we turn to right which swings side of ridge (after we came to top of ridge, so far I could to judge that new National Park trail should go straight follow ridge from this point).  At 3.35 m. spring at left; at 3.65 trail faint; at 3.7 m. B.M. 5075 at right.  After fighting briers and snags hit Ridge Trail at 4.05 m. turn to right and 10 feet there is B.M. 5295-0 at left, follows ridge trail.  At 4.8 m. highest point of...

Page 01
  masa007b

...Richland Mountain (old map shows this ridge called Rich Mountain, but N.C. Nomenclature Committee changed to Richland Mountain as other Rich Mountain in National Park Area in Tenn. and well known).  At 5.9 m. junction of A.T. on State Line, turn to left going down to Dry Sluice Gap at 6.22 m. B.M. 5374-5 on rock at right; follow state line to Charles Bunion at 6.48 m.  11:30, ate lunch came down to Dry Sluice Gap to Junction of Richland Mountain Trail at 6.98 m.  Follow state line toward East passed Sawtooth arrived Porters Gap 2:20 P.M. at 8.83 m.; leave state line turn to right came down Goldmine Branch at 11.36 m. came to Chasm Prong at 4:15 P.M. turn to left follow down along creek; at 12.85 m. junction of main Creek, turn to right follow trail along creek; at 15.63 m. old camped ground at right; at 16.0 m. Big Poplar Tree at left; at 16.4 m. trail to Richland Mountain which we took this morning at right and arrived camp 7:00 P.M. 16.88 m.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Monday May 30, - Bradley Fork - State Line - Hughes Ridge.
Leave camp 7:30 A.M. follows same trail that came down yesterday till forks of Chasm Prong at 3.35 m. across main prong toward Chasm Prong, trail starts follows right bank of main prong.  At 3.5 m. after cross Creek old camped ground at right; at 4.3 m. Frowning Rock Prong at left, follow Gulf Prong at right.  At 5.8 m. forks of Prong take left, from here quite steep climb.  Top of State Line 12:30 P.M. at 7.9 m. ate lunch and leave at 1:15 P.M. follows state line; at 8.8 m. one of high Knob; at 9.6 m. Pecks Corner where Hughes Ridge joins main Hughes Ridge there is no trail.  Our attempt were about 1 1/2 m. follow Ridge then turn in right come down Bearwallow Creek to Bradley, but so far couldn't find location which headwater of Bearwallow Creek, so followed Ridge at 13.3 m.  Some one suggested let's go down, but I knew if we can not hit right location, must thru what called "HELL".  The point 13.3 m. we find Old Long Ridge Trail so turn in right follow trail, but this trail faint out later, I suggest turn to left go down toward Taywa Creek hit Park Service Trail which lead us just above camp but most opinion overruled it and followed ridge then finally got thru "HELL" to Bradley Fork at 15.5 m.  Followed trail to camp at 17.4 m. 7:15 P.M.

At 13.3 m. we should follow ridge trail just a little further down then turn to right follow Park Service Trail come down Taywa Creek to Bradley Fork.  But it was good experience thru one of these "HELL": - Rhododendron, laurel thickets with greenbriers.

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masa008a

CAROLINA MOUNTAIN CLUB
TRIP REPORT

Trip Name: Camp Three Forks and Mt. Guyot       Date: July 2-4, 1932

Mileage of round trip: By car 160 miles; Afoot 34 1/4 miles;        [Measured] ?

Time required: By car 2 1/2 hours one way; Afoot (See trail log).

Departure: From Asheville 6:30; From car [?]
Arrival:  At car 12-30; At Asheville [?]

Members: 6        Visitors: 2

Trip Register: 
LEADER, Barbara Ambler
George Masa
Roger Morrow
Dr. O. C. Barker
Dr. S. Weizenblatt
Pauline Smathers

Visitors:
Mrs. George Cushing
Mrs. Tom Alexander

Motor Log: (Asheville to point of leaving car)
Left Federal Building Saturday at 6:30 followed Highway #10 through Canton, Waynesville, Sylva and Dillsboro, turned right at Highway #112 passed the Cherokee Indian Reservation to Smokemount, turn right at Smokemount over bridge and follow road #107 until you come to Swan's place about 2 miles above Smokemount, where you can park cars and also leave them in a garage.

Trail Log: From Camp Three Forks to Swan's Place.
Left parked cars at 9:30 A.M.  Hiked up road 3/4 of a mile turned right onto trail, going up the side of the mountain, 1/8 mile further trail forks, - take left trail - 1/4 mile more, and can see Hughes Ridge ahead and to the right.  Chasteen Creek is on the left.  Three miles fram [six] cars, look west to see Clingmans Dome - and 1/4 mile further to spring.  Hughes ridge next point of interest - four hard miles from the cars and should arrange not to go over this area in the middle of the day, as it is mostly cut over land and very hot.  Turn left at top of ridge and follow top of ridge for about 1/2 mile, then drop down on the other side for Enloe Creek, where we reached at 12:00, which is a good place for lunch.  5 1/2 miles from cars.  One mile to the top of Highlands ridge, elevation 4990, drop down off of the ridge for Ocunaluffty [sic] River.  (Be sure to cross river on foot log)  Trail from the river to vamp is very good and no more climbing, we reached Camp Three Forks at 2:25.  9 1/2 miles Elevation 4203.

- over -

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  masa008b

Sunday - Trip to Mr. [sic] Guyot

This trip being much harder than going into Three Forks, only George Masa, Roger Morrow, and Doc Barker went.

Left camp 7:15 A.M.  Proceeded up Middle Fork Ridge 1 3/4 miles to a spring 50 feet to left of trail.  At 9:15 reached tree used as lookout, near the top of Cams Knob 2 3/4 miles from Camp.  Elevation 5834.  Cams Knob 6140 - encounted [sic] a bad wind fall (trail very hard to follow) 10:00 A.M. 4 miles - ruff [sic] going.  Next Mr. [sic] Hardison 3/4 mile from Cams Knob, 6148 Elevation.  Then down into "Hell no-a-gap" (named by George Masa) 10:50 A.M.  Up again to Mt. Yonagusta 5 1/2 miles from camp.  Elevation 6183.  Mt. Sterling lies about eight miles east of here.  Turn left on ridge to Three Corners 3/4 mile away - 11:20.  At this point we came onto the N.C.-Tenn. State Line and Appalachian Trail.  Turn right on same and advance up to Mt. Guyot.  A stiff climb to top of ridge - the left trail to tower 1/8 mile away.  Elevation of Guyot is 6621.  Totat [sic] distance from camp 7 1/2 miles.  But what miles. 

The day was very clear and two hours were spent on the top of the tower.  The entire Mitchell range 60 miles away, was quite clear - Pisgah and Ledge - Cold Mountain, Narrows, Steps and Shining Rock, Lickstone Bald, Cold Springs Knob, Richland Balsams, Nantahalas, Andrews Bald, Clingmans Dome, Mingus, Kephart, Le Conte and even Thunder Head stood out clearly.

Returning - backtracked 1 1/2 miles, then left trail and plunged into a beautiful forest to right and down 3/4 mile to south where we reached the headquarters of left fork of Onunaluffty [sic].  Followed stream into camp - very picturesque, but hard and wet.  Arrived camp 6:00 P.M.  Total distance round trip 16 1/4 miles.

Monday.
Returned to Swan's Place by same trail and reached cards [sic] about 12:00 and Asheville about 3:30.

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masa009

CAROLINA MOUNTAIN CLUB
TRIP REPORT

Trip Name: Purchase Knob to Park Boundary       Date: August 14, 1932

Mileage of round trip: By car 97.7 miles; Afoot 10.1 miles;        [Measured] By wheel.

Time required: By car 1 3/4 hours one way; Afoot 7 hours (total)

Departure: From Asheville 7:10 A.M.; From car 8:40 A.M.
Arrival:  At car 3:50 P.M.; At Asheville 5:30 P.M.

Members: 7        Visitors: 2

Trip Register: 
LEADER, H. C. Wilburn
L. D. Rogers
Mrs. O. C. Barker
Dr. O. C. Barker
Verne [?]
Marcus Book
R. V. Morrow
Elisha Wilburn
George Masa

Motor Log: (Asheville to point of leaving car)
Starting Federal Building follows N.C. 10 West, at 31.4 m. Court house of Waynesville at right, turn the corner to right follows N.C. 284, Dellwood at 36.6 m.  N.C. 293 at right, just before reaching Cove Creek, P.O. N.C. 289 at right, at 43.25 m.  Cove Creek Gap at 48.95 m.  Cove Creek Gap Elevation is 4062 ft.  On U.S.G.S.Topo sheet shows Camp Gap.  Parked cars, but there is not much space in this Gap 3 cars near occupied space.
Notes: N.C. 293 at Dellwood, goes to Soco Gap, dirt road.
           N.C. 289 at Cove Creek, goes to Pigeon River and connects with N.C. 209 at Fines Creek.

Trail Log:
Trail from this gap start right West of highway, southwesterly course along ridge, about 10 yards through gate, on our right good views of Mt. Sterling to Big Cataloochee.  Gate at 0.1 m.  A gap at 0.39 m., corn field at left at 1.0 m.  At 2.2 m. just before enter blackberry patch one trail comes up at right, this is Panther Spring Gap.  At 2.3 m. one trail comes up at left open field, rail fence at left at 2.72 m., at 3.16 m. gap, Trail forks at 3.2 m. take left, start a little steep climb on top of Knob at 3.35 m. cross wire fence, another steady pull get up a knob at 3.8 m. cross wire fence, then trail forks, one straight trail is dim, and other which turn to left well beaten, straight trail is Cataloochee Divide Ridge Trail and other is to Purchase Knob, turn to left and cross gate at 4.0 m., at 4.1 m. entering grassy field follow below ridge and come to big rock, then across field, at 4.35 m. spring at right below (about 100 ft) trail, enter wooded slope turn to right near the ridge at grassy field, then enter wooded ridge, follow ridge to the top of Purchase Knob at 5.05 m.

There is [sic] no open views from the top of Purchase Knob, but below where grassy field lies nice views toward Cataloochee Divide and toward East to South.

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masa010a

CAROLINA MOUNTAIN CLUB
TRIP REPORT

Trip Name: Cold Mountain, Elevation 6,000 ft.       Date: January 1, 1933

Mileage of round trip: By car 72.8 miles; Afoot 9.45 miles;        [Measured] By wheel.

Time required: By car 1 1/2 hours one way; Afoot 8 hours (total)

Departure: From Asheville 7:15 A.M.; From car 8:45 A.M.
Arrival:  At car 4:30 P.M.; At Asheville 6:00 P.M.

Members:         Visitors:

Trip Register: 
LEADER, George Masa
Jewel King
Marcus Book
Boby [sic] Gottlieb
Dr. O. C. Barker
Charles Book
Roger Morrow
William Schwartz

Motor Log: (Asheville to point of leaving car)
Drove N.C. No. 10 West from Federal Building, at 19.6 m first signal lights at Canton off No.10 to left thru Canton, at 19.8 m. turn left onto No. 110, at 25.3 m. junction No.284, take left followed No. 284, at 34.2 m. Cruso P.O. at left, before crossing Crawford Creek Bridge at 36.1 m. off highway turn to left follow dirt road and at 36.25 parked cars in pasture.

Trail Log:
Follow wagon road toward upstream of Crawford Creek, at 0.4 m cross bridge, at 0.55 m. cross bridge, at 0.7 m. cross bridge 0.8 m. cross bridge, at 1.9 m. road at left, at 2.09 m. road forks take left, at 2.15 m. cross bridge, at 2.4 cross bridge, at 2.56 m. road forks take right, at 2.9 m. road forks take right, road from here on washed out bad shape, better call trail, at 3.1 m. trail forks take right toward cabin, at 3.15 Cabin, this cabin very small and signed by G. S. Williams saying do not break in get key anytime welcome to user, but lock already bursted, use wire shut the door. Here is trail confusing that one trail well beaten toward branch and others follow ridge, both meet further up, take your choice. At 3.4 m. springs and trail getting steeper towards Deep Gap. At 3.5 m. Deep Gap turn right follow ridge, at 4.15 m. start steep climb then trail swings side of mountain conies to springs at 4.45 m.

Page 01
  masa010b At 4.55 m. top of ridge, open grassy field turn right, at 4.95 m highest point of Cold Mountain, but this point can not see all way around, you will find many places short distance from this point views each direction - Big Bald of Bald Mountain N. lo [sic] E., Mt. Sterling N. 25 W., Mt, Guyot N. 40 ¥., Mt. LeConte N. 60 W. We did not take sites of Blacks, Pisgah and Balsam Mountains, but see all these mountains.

We took trail from top along ridge of East Spur of Cold Mountain at 6.0 m. grassy gap, at 7.25 m. trail swing left Big Oak tree and this trail going down to Cold Creek, so we turned right followed ridge of cause there is no trail, very steep came down to road at 8.55 m. turn left came back to cars at 9.45 m.

We spent nearly one hour at the top, ate lunch and looked around.

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Asheville, N. C. Easter Sunday, April 16, 1933

SHINING ROCK HIKE

A party of eight left Post Office at 7:20 A. M., with the exception of George Masa the party was complete. Mr. Masa got sick and could not go. The party composed Dr. Weisenblatt [sic], E. H. and C. H. Miller, R. Durand, L, Whitworth, Chas. and Marcus Book and the leader M. Lip in sky.

None of us having been to Shining Rock by this route we followed the Bulletin's log and finally reached a distance of 35.8 miles, instead of- 39.8 as the bulletin listed.

Leaving the two cars parked in a mud road we began our hike, leaving at 9:15 A. M, The sun was out and the air peppy, a beautiful April day. We passed under the flume at 9:40 .A.M. and hit trail for the Scapecat Ridge, which proved to be a five mile hike from where we were parked. We reached the old saw mill site at 10:35 A- M. and started to ascend Scapecat Mt. which we reached at 11:50 ii. M. We ascended by the Scapecat Creek.

We lunched on top of Scapecat and left there for Shining Rock about 5/4 mile, which we reached at 2:15 P. M. After having some pictures made by Photographers Book and Whitworth, (in order to show George we made the hike to Shining Rock) we began our descent thru the valley and creek. The view from Scapecat and Shining Rock was very beautiful. You could pick out the peaks near by and visibility was good for a great distance. By the way, the leader wished to suggest to the club that the Government will find plenty of work up there for at least one thousand men for a year's work in cleaning off the dead and burnt timber,

We reached the Saw Mill at 4:15 casing down Shining Creek and our oar at 5:15 P. M.

The party had a fine trip and we were lucky we had no rain, but ran into showers on ride home.

Not having the wheel, we estimated the distance as 6 miles to Shining Rock and 5 miles back, a total of 11 miles. Most of the party picked Galax leaves, but outside of the hike which was fairly tough, there was [sic] no outstanding events.

Respectfully submitted,
Morris [?]
HIKE LEADER

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masa012a

CAROLINA MOUNTAIN CLUB
TRIP REPORT

Trip Name: Andrews Bald and Clingmans Dome       Date: ______

Mileage of round trip: By car ______; Afoot ______;        [Measured] By wheel.

Time required: By car ______ one way; Afoot ______ (total)

Departure: From Asheville ______; From car ______
Arrival:  At car ______; At Asheville ______

Members: 4        Visitors: 6

Trip Register: 
LEADER, George Masa
Etta M. Wills
Doris C. Matthews
Geraldine DuPriest
Alfred H. Wills
[?]
O. C. Barker
Mrs. O. C. Barker
Marcus Book
Charles H. Book
1 to 5 member of Natural Bridge Appalachian Trail Club, Lynchburg, Va.

Motor Log: (Asheville to point of leaving car)
Follow N.C. No. 10 West to Bryson City (70.7 m.) at the Square, Court House at right turn to right cross Tuckaseegee River Bridge after crossing Railroad turn to left follow N.C. 288, at 77.7 m just this side of Noland Creek Bridge turn right on dirt road follow East bank of Noland Creek, to Clingmans Dome Camp at ______

Trail Log:
Set wheel at forks of Noland Creek Road, 0.2 m. below Clingmans Dome Camp, Mill Creek School behind on top of the hill, follow wagon road At 0.35 road forks, take right, left road goes up old Jenkins House; At 0.6 m. cross Mills Creek Bridge and turn to right, follow Mill Creek; At 1.0 m. Tulip tree at right; At 1.1 m. trail forks, close watch be taken, the trail sharp turn to right very dim and weeds over grow and straight trail more distinct but further up trail, bridge washed out so turn to right and cross Creek at 1.13 m.; Cross Creek at 1.18 m. At 1.26 m. trail forks take left, cross Creek at 1.64 m. cross branch at 1.65 m. 2 mile marker on birch tree at left; At 2.05 cross branch, swing side of ridge then steep grade, at 2.8 m. cross branch, 3 mile marker on Birch tree at left; 3.35 m. at the Gap where Bald Creek trail comes up, sharp turn to left; At 3.8 m. Eastern edge of Andrews Bald (to the cabin which locates at lower end of Bald 0.3 m.) follow near the edge toward north; Northern edge of Bald at 3.98 m. sign at right "Clingmans Dome 2 m." We added "Clingmans Dome Camp 4 m." At 4.08 m. trail forks, at right goes up to the top of Andrews Bald and at right graded skirt round, we took graded trail, at 4.3 trails meet, turn to left, about 15 feet sign at right "Noland Creek via Bald Cr."  Follows ridge toward Clingmans Dome.

(over)

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  masa012b At 4.65 trail at left which goes down to logging railroad grade this trail not much travel these days so briers covering trail. At 5.15 m. trail entiring [sic] Balsam grow, at 5.2 m. opening, at 5.25 reentiring [sic] Balsams, At 5.8 m. tower on Clingmans Dome, B.M. 6642, highest point in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Page 02

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2 *  *  * George Masa Estate [2 items]

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  1
masa013a
24 July 1933.
Letter from Anthony Lord to Marcus Book.

Dear Mr. Book,

You will find inclosed [sic] a ledger sheet showing the income and disbursements in an account with George Masa's funeral expenses.  To the best of my knowledge and belief all bills have been paid and as you will see all monies taken in have been expended.

Aside from acknowledgements you may care to make to individual contributors (whose names will be found on the ledger sheet) it seems to me that it might be in order to write Mr. W. W. Dodge who made a silver plate for the top of the casket; Mr. C. C. Stauffer who furnished the ledger at cost; Messers George Arthur and Robert Valier of the Artisan's Shop who made up the wooden part of the casket without cost; Mr. W. H. Arthur who covered the casket with copper at cost, and to the Reynolds Undertaking establishment who very kindly did a number of things which they were not paid to do.  Perhaps also a letter might be sent to the Head Nurse or Superintendent at the County Sanitorium expressing appreciation for the care and kindness which George received while there.

I am turning over to you together with the ledger account all the receipts I have had for payments made.  I will ask that you please let me have your receipt for these documents.

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  masa013b With best wishes, I am,

Very sincerely yours,
Anthony Lord

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  2
masa014
21 June 1933.
Receipt made out to Anthony Lord from C. C. Stauffer for the sum of nine dollars and seventy-five cents.  For the sale of lumber.
  3
masa015
23 June 1933.
Receipt made out to Anthony Lord from Reynolds Undertaking Co. for the sum of ten dollars.  Entry reads, "Burial and funeral expenses of George Masa."
  4
masa016
23 June 1933.
Receipt made out to Anthony Lord from Asheville Cemetery Company for the sum of twenty dollars.  Entry reads, "For interment fee, Geo. Masa.  Single grave, Geo. Masa."
  5
masa017
26 June 1933.
Receipt made out to Anthony Lord from W. H. Arthur Company for the sum of eighteen dollars.
  6
masa018
Undated.
Ledger sheet showing balance of contributions collected for George Masa's burial expenses, as well as disbursements made to various businesses.
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masa019
2 March 1939.
Letter from R. V. Morrow to Miss Hale.

Dear Miss Hale,

I enclose check for one hundred dollars - payable to the Carolina Mtn. Club - from Kenneth Lee, Adm. of estate of George Masa.  We are to use such part of it as is necessary to erect a suitable marker at Masa's grave.  The balance - if any - goes to the Mountain Club in reimbursement of Mr. Masa's funeral expenses.

I think it would be better to cash this check as soon as possible, and deposit the one hundred dollars in the savings account of the Club, since we do not have a checking account of the the Club.

Very truly yours,
R. V. Morrow

P.S.  It may be several months before we use this money for the marker.

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3 *  *  * Secondary source materials [4 items]

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  1
masa020a
5 September 1953.
Article in The State magazine, Vol. XXI, No. 14, by Virginia T. Lathrop, "The Little Jap: His pictures were among the first to tell the world about the beauties of the Great Smoky Mountains" [2 copies].

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masa021
25 August 1960.
Letter  from Carolina Mountain Club, Inc. to Mrs. Albert H. [née Virginia T.] Lathrop.

Dear Mrs. Lathrop,

The help we are getting from you is a delightful surprise to me I received the thermofax copy which you had said you would send—and so promptly.

Someone had called my attention to your article of seven years ago in The State magazine. It was just what we needed to substantiate our claim that the person of George Masa is worthy of being commemorated with a peak bearing his name.

On behalf of Carolina Mountain Club I extend you our heartfelt thanks,

With best wishes, I am

Sincerely yours,

CAROLINA MOUNTAIN CLUB, INC.

by----------------------------O.D.

Chm. George Masa Memorial Committee
78 Haywood Street
Asheville, N. C.

  3
masa022
Undated.
Article by Bill Sharpe, "Indian on a Bike," [source unknown].

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4 *  *  * "George Masa, A Brief Biography" by Samuel Robinson [5 copies]

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  masa023a

GEORGE MASA — A BRIEF BIOGRAPHY

George Masa, whose original name was Masahara Iisuka, was born in Japan on January 20, 1881, the son of a jeweler. Mot much is known of his early life as Masa was a taciturn and reserved person who did not confide even in his close companions. He came to America at the age of 24 to pursue advanced studies in mining engineering. He was a student at the University of Colorado for a time. The death of his father put an end to his college career and to his ties with Japan« He was employed at some phases of engineering work in Colorado and also lived for a time in New Orleans. In 1915 he came to Asheville, North Carolina as an employee of Grove Park Inn. Later he started a small photographic business as a part-time business which he finally developed into a photographic studio in downtown Asheville known as the Plateau Studio. However business and the making of money was really foreign to his nature. His real interest was taking pictures of the mountains. He was intensely appreciative of the natural beauty of the scenes presented in the Great Smoky and Blue Ridge mountains to such an extent that he perfected himself in scenic photography For trips into the Great Smoky Mountains he teamed up with the late Horace Kephart, the author.

George Masa was a charter member of the Carolina Mountain Club after the merger with the Appalachian Trail Club and was very prominent in its activities especially in the establishment of the Appalachian Trail in the Pisgah and Smoky mountains. George Masa contracted tuberculosis as a result of his rugged activities in difficult terrain and exposure to all kinds of bad weather in his intent endeavor to capture outstanding views. He died on June 21, 1933 and was buried in Riverside Cemetery at Asheville.

The partnership between Kephart, the writer, and Masa, the mountain man and photographer, was without doubt a potent influence in drawing the attention of the nation to the possibilities for the establishment of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Kephart's writings and Masa's pictures attained national status.

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  masa023b

Neither Kephart nor Masa lived to attend the formal dedication of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Recognition was accorded Horace Kephart when Mount Kephart was designated as a memorial to his name.

The movement to have the memory of George Masa memorialized with a peak named in his honor has been in the minds of the people who knew and recognized his work and his influence,, In an article in the Asheville Citizen-Times of June 4, 1939 James H. Caine states "When George Masa died some six years ago there was a movement afoot to fittingly recognize what he had done to preserve in pictorial history the scenic grandeur of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. But like Mark Twain's weather nothing has been done about it ......... (He describes in detail George Masa's activities and his funeral) ......... Not long thereafter a Knoxville publisher launched a movement to name a peak of the Great Smokies for George Masa and it met with general favor."

The Carolina Mountain Club in renewing the proposal to have a peak in the Smokies named Masa Mountain as a memorial to George Masa adopted resolutions on May 11, 1960 from which we quote "About forty years ago there came to Western North Carolina a man slight in build but huge in appreciation of the glories of the outdoors. The man Japanese by birth and by nationality was Masahara Iisuka who became known by the simplified name of George Masa. From the very beginning George Masa was awed by the grandeur of our mountain ranges and the unique flora of the region. He was seized with the longing to climb along the ridges and mountain tops for the pleasure of viewing the handiwork of God from the high places. He became highly skilled in outdoor photography in order that he might be able to capture the remarkable vistas that are ever changing with the season, the light and the clouds of the sky. He became a charter member of the Carolina Mountain Club which was organized to the pool the resources of mountain lovers for trips into the wilderness of remote sections of Western North Carolina. The establishment of the Appalachian Trail was one of the early projects of this organization and George Masa led many parties on work trips to clear, blaze and map the course of that trail through the virgin country of the Great...

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  masa023c

...Smoky Mountains. With his artistic skill, patience and perserverance he took photographs of serrated peaks, rhododendron thickets and vistas which to this day are classic examples of art in photography. Many or his pictures entailed a great deal of hardship in making his way over rough terrain to a good viewpoint and patience in waiting through rain and windstorms for the right lighting conditions to obtain the picture that his artistic sense envisioned. Many of these expeditions he made in the company of Horace Kephart after whom Mount Kephart in the Smoky Mountains is named. No doubt the trips into the Smokies of Kephart, Masa and other mountain lovers was a potent influence in the establishment of the Great Smoky Mountains National park.

The above account described what an outstanding service George Masa performed in the years before his death in 1933 in interesting the people of this region as well as that of the United States in the magnificence of our physical surroundings and in teaching people to appreciate the simple pleasures of beholding the unspoiled handiwork of God.

So in commemoration of the stranger who stirred us to such depths of love for our wilderness areas we of the Carolina Mountain Club desire that a peak in the Great Smoky Mountains be named in his honor just as Mount Kephart was named in honor of his associate on mountain trips."

Respectfully submitted,                               
by Samuel Robinson, O. D.                        

Chmn. George Masa Memorial Committee
Carolina Mountain Club                  
Asheville, N. C.                              

References:

"The Little Jap" by Virginia T. Lathrop                             State Magazine               Sept. 3, 1953

"George Masa Laid to Rest"                                            Asheville Times              June 23, 1933

"Today and Yesterday" by James H. Caine                      Asheville Citizen-Times    June 4, 1939

"Proposal Is Made " by C. R. Sumner                             Asheville Citizen-Times  Dec. 13, 1953

"Masa Captured Nature's..." by George W. McCoy        Asheville Citizen-Times  May 21, 1950

"George Masa's Funeral"                                                 Asheville Citizen            June 28, 1933

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  masa023d

"George Masa" - Editorial                                               Asheville Citizen-Times  June 22, 1933

"Great Smokies Were A Temple to George Masa" by John Paris                          Aug. 27, 1959

"Minutes and Records of Carolina Mountain Club"                                 Years 1930, 31, 32, 33

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5 *  *  * Appalachian Trail related items [5 items]

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  1
masa024
7 August 1932.
Article in the Asheville Citizen-Times, "Appalachian Trail from Maine to Georgia Traverses WNC and Smokies."

Includes information on the North Carolina portion of the Appalachian Trail, as well as the advances made by members of the Carolina Mountain Club.


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masa025
16 June 1934.
Letter from Laura C. Smith to M. H. Avery.

Writes in reference to a donation made by the CMC to the Appalachian Trail Conference.  Cheque enclosed.

  3
masa026
19 June 1934.
Letter from Raymond H. Torrey to Laura C. Smith.

Writes to acknowledge receipt of the CMC's contribution to the Appalachian Trail Conference.

  4
masa027a
20 June 1934.
Letter from M. H. Avery to Laura C. Smith.

Writes to inform Smith, Secretary-Treasurer of the CMC, that a cheque enclosed with her letter of 16 June has been forwarded to Treasurer Torrey of the Appalachian Trail Conference.

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  masa027b

[Map]  APPALACHIAN TRAIL, MAINE TO GEORGIA

Back
  5
masa028
n.d., circa January 1962.

"The Appalachian Trail in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park" [10 copies].

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

North Carolina—Tennessee

THE APPALACHIAN TRAIL IN THE GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS RATIONAL PARK

The Appalachian Trail follows the North Caroline-Tennessee state line, along the crest of the Smokies for a total distance of approximately 70-niiles from its eastern terminus at Davenport Gap to its southwestern terminus at Fontana Dam. The trans -mountain highway, U.S. 441, intersects this trail at its approximate half-way point, Newfound Gap.

The eastern section of the trail (between Davenport Gap and Newfound Gap) is a. graded 4-foot standard horse trail. The western section (between Newfound Gap and Doe Knob is an ungraded, brushed out foot trail, rather rough in places, marked with white paint. In the section between Doe Knob on the state line and Fontana Dam, the trail has been marked and brushed out; it is very steep between Shucks tack and Fontana.

There are 13 trailside shelters on this trail, located as follows: Davenport Gap Shelter (9/10 mile from Davenport Gap); Cosby Knob (7.1 miles from Davenport Gap); Tri-Corner Knob (7.5 miles from Cosby Knob); Pecks Corner (5.8 miles from Tri-Corner Knob); False Gap (3.2 miles from Pecks Corner); Ice Water Springs (3.45 miles from False Gap); Mt. Collins (6:45 miles from Ice Water Springs); Silers Bald (6.85 miles from Mt. Collins); Derrick Knob (5.73 miles from Silers Bald); Spence Field (5.50 miles from Derrick Knob); Russell Field (2.93 miles from Spence Field); Mollie's Ridge (2.13 miles from Russell Field); Birch Springs (4.45 miles from Mollie's Ridge, 2.2 miles from Doe Knob on state line, and 5.4 miles from Fontana). There is also such a shelter at Moore Spring on Gregory Bald, 9.9 miles from Spence Field, 2.6 miles from dog Knob, 7 miles from Deals Gap), and on Mt. LeConte.

The shelters are enclosed on three sides with one large opening on the front, (long) side. In each shelter is a bunk made of a wooden frame with heavy wire screen for the springs, raised off the ground about 2 feet; this should accommodate 6 persons (and in some instances 12). Each shelter has a fireplace, water supply, garbage pit and pit latrine. There are no means for heating the shelters.

Camping or fire-building is permitted along this trail only at the trailside shelters, except when some unforeseen emergency may arise. The stay at any one shelter is limited to one night unless inclement weather prevents the resumption of the trip. A camping permit is required for camping along this trail. Such a permit may be obtained from any of the rangers or upon application to the office of the Superintendent, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Gatlinburg, Tennessee. The application must contain such information as to the dates between which the camping will be done, the section of the trail to be traversed, and the number of persons in the party.

Hikers should store their food and packsacks out of reach of bears. One method is to suspend such items from a branch that is too light to carry the bear's weight and far enough out so that the bear cannot reach such items from either the tree trunk or ground. DO NOT PLACE FOOD, OR WALK UPON METAL ROOFS OF THE SHELTERS.

Because of the scarcity of fuel at the shelters, hikers are advised to carry primus-type stoves. Frequent showers occur during every month of the year - rain gear is highly recommended.

Rev. 1/62

Folder Item Description Thumbnail
6 *  *  * Masa Knob and Masa memorial, newspaper clippings and letters [17 items]

*  *  *  *  *

  1
masa029a
 
7 May 1960.
Carolina Mountain Club Resolution, "On the Naming of a Peak in Commemoration of George Masa."
Page 01
  masa029b   Page 02
  2
masa030
31 May 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to the Board of Geographic Names.

Writes to inform the Board the CMC's resolution to have a peak named in honor of Masa.

  3
masa031
21 June 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to the Board of Geographic Names.

Writes in reply to a letter from J. O. Kilmartin.  Informs the Board of the CMC's decision regarding the naming of a peak in honor of Masa.

  4
masa032
2 August 1960.
"Mountain Club Hears Report on Masa Peak."

Article in the Asheville Citizen.


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  5
masa033a
4 August 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Conrad L. Wirth.

Writes Firth to inform him of the CMC's resolution to amend their choice of peak.

Page 01
  masa033b   Page 02
  6
masa034
4 August 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Congressman Roy A. Taylor.

Thanks Congressman Taylor for his activities on behalf of the CMC.

  7
masa035
31 August 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Congressman Roy A. Taylor.

Writes to keep Taylor abreast of the latest developments regarding the move to name a peak in honor of Masa.

  8
masa036
15 September 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to J. O. Kilmartin.

Writes to keep Kilmartin, of the Board of Geographic Names, abreast of the latest developments regarding the move to name a peak in honor of Masa.

  9
masa037
5 October 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Richard E. Degenhardt.

Writes to keep Degenhardt, of the Asheville Chamber of Commerce, abreast of the latest developments regarding the move to name a peak in honor of Masa.

  10
masa038
4 November 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Fred J. Overly.

Refers Overly, Superintendent of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, to the testimony of Mr. Verne Rhoades of Asheville, a retired Supervisor of Pisgah National Forest.

  11
masa039
16 November 1960.
Letter from J. O.. Kilmartin to Samuel Robinson.

Refers to requests made by the CMC to have a peak named in Masa's honor.

12
masa040a
n.d., circa 22 January 1961.
"Proposal to Name Peak for Masa to Be Pushed," and   Articles published in the Asheville Citizen.

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masa040b 7 February 1961.
"Club to Pinpoint, Measure Proposed George Masa Peak."

copyright protected
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  13
masa041a
7 March 1961.
Photographs in the Asheville Citizen.

Upper left.  Shows an unnamed peak in the Great Smoky Mountains [2 copies].


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  masa041b Lower right.  Depicts David Wright and Arch Nichols of the CMC [3 copies].
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  14
masa042
21 April 1961.
Letter from J. O.. Kilmartin to Samuel Robinson.

Informs Robinson of the Board of Geographic Names' decision to name a peak "Masa Knob," in honor of the late George Masa.

  15
masa043a
26 April 1961.
Letter from Arch Nichols to Jean [surname unknown].

Informs the recipient of the naming of Masa Knob.

  16
masa043b
25 April 1961.
"Peak in Great Smokies Named for George Masa."

Article in the Asheville Citizen.

Enclosure

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  16
masa044
Undated.
Memorandum of place names and distances along the Appalachian Trail.  Evidently intended for use as a hiking guide.  Begins at "Newfound Gap" and ends at "Hwy."  [Signed] "Arch Nichols."
Folder Item Description Thumbnail
7 *  *  * Project to name Masa Knob. Correspondence, newspaper clipping, reports [16 items]

*  *  *  *  *

  1
masa045
30 September 1958.
Publication of the Information Service, Department of the Interior.

Reports on administrative changes within the Department.  To wit, "responsibility for coordination of staff work on domestic geographic names . . . transferred to the Geological Survey."

  2
masa046a
28 January 1960.
Carolina Mountain Club, "Report on George Masa Project" by Samuel Robinson.

CAROLINA MOUNTAIN CLUB
REPORT ON GEORGE MASA PROJECT

I have studied and investigated the relationship of George Masa with the Carolina Mountain Club.

Mr. Masa was a photographer of Japanese extraction who came to Asheville in the 1920's who fell in love with the natural beauty of our mountain country.  As a member of the Carolina Appalachian Trail Club he was inducted into the Carolina Mountain Club when the two organized groups merged in 1931.

From that date on to the date of his death on June 21, 1933 he was an ardent and efficient worker in the activities of the Carolina Mountain Club.

I shall not go into detail now concerning George Masa's work with the club.  Suffice it to say that he set an example of appreciation of God's handiwork in shaping the landscape of Western North Carolina.  His zeal and his artistic instinct resulted in his capturing vistas of outstanding beauty of landscapes and of flora of our mountains.  To this day some of these photographs have become classic examples that will endure for generations.

In view of the above considerations, I am recommending that the Carolina Mountain Club undertake the project of commemorating the 80th anniversary of the birthday of George Masa with suitable memorial activities.  The date is 20th of January 1961.  Thus the club has a full year to prepare for it.

Here is an outline of activities for the project.
1.  The compilation of a short biography of George Masa to be published in the newspapers at around that date.
2.  Completion of our project of some seven years to get a peak in our mountains named in his honor.  As a suggestion I offer sharp peak north of Charlie's Bunion to be named Masa's Pinnacle.  Unofficially these two peaks were known originally as "The Fodderstacks."

Page 01
  masa046b 3.  The placing of a plaque at the site of George Masa's grave in Riverside Cemetery citing the inspirational services that Mr. Masa performed in stimulating appreciation of the beauty of our wilderness areas.
4.  Dignified Memorial Services at the grave of George Masa with a prominent speaker to give inspiration for the occasion.

The above project should not be entered into half-heartedly.  For the good of the club and for the inspiration that George Masa's life affords we need every member's active effort as well as some amount of money to be expended.

Respectfully submitted,
Samuel Robinson
January 28, 1960

Page 02
  3
masa047
6 June 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to the Board of Geographic Names.

Writes to inform the Board the CMC's resolution to have a peak named in honor of Masa.

  4 22 January 1961.
"Proposal to Name Peak for Masa to be Pushed."

Article in the Asheville Citizen-Times.

Duplicate of:
masa040a
  5
masa048
23 January 1961.
Letter from George M. Stephens to William Medford.

Writes to voice his support for the Masa memorial peak initiative.

  6
masa049
24 January 1961.
"Resolution" of the North Carolina National Park, Parkway and Forests Development Commission.

"RESOLVED, that the North Carolina National Park, Parkway and Forests Development Commission go on record as favoring the naming of that unnamed peak in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park located near Mt. Kephart and west of Charlie's Bunion, with an elevation of approximately 5,600 feet, as "Masa's Pinnacle," in honor of George Masa, whose photographs of the Great Smokies did much to arouse both local and national interest in the preservation of the area and the formation of a National Park."

  7
masa050
25 January 1961.
Fred J. Overly to Samuel Robinson.

Requests a biography of Masa and photographs of the mountain.

  8
masa051
28 January 1961.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Fred J. Overly.

States the CMC's intention to supply Overly with a biography of Masa and photographs of the mountain.

  9 7 February 1961.
"Club to Pinpoint, Measure Proposed George Masa Peak."

Article in the Asheville Citizen.

Duplicate of:
masa040b
  10
masa052
7 March 1961.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Fred J. Overly.

Sends Overly copies of a traverse log entitled, "Peak Proposed to be Named 'Masa Mountain' and "George Masa, --- A Brief Biography [2 copies]."

  11 Enclosure.
"George Masa, --- A Brief Biography" by Samuel Robinson, Chairman of the George Masa Memorial Committee, Carolina Mountain Club, Asheville, NC.  Contains bibliography.
Duplicates of:
masa023a-d
  12
masa053
Enclosure.
"Peak Proposed to be Named 'Masa Mountain.'"

Traverse log listing details - physical location, features, etc. - of the proposed memorial peak [2 copies].

  13
masa054a
8 March 1961.
Fred J. Overly to Samuel Robinson.

Asks for clarification regarding the proposed name of the Masa memorial peak.

Page 01
  masa054b   Page 02
  14
masa055
10 March 1961.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Fred J. Overly.

Clarifies the CMC's resolution to have a specific peak named in honor of Masa [2 copies].

  15
masa056
21 April 1961.
Letter from J. O. Kilmartin to Samuel Robinson.

Informs the CMC of the Board on Geographic Names decision to name a peak, Masa Knob.

  16
masa057a
8 May 1961.
Carolina Mountain Club, George Masa Memorial Committee, "Final Report."

CAROLINA MOUNTAIN CLUB
GEORGE MASA MEMORIAL COMMITTEE
FINAL REPORT

At a meeting of the Council of the Carolina Mountain Club in 1958 I offered a Program of Progress for the advancement of the club.  Late the council saw fit to adopt the first part of the Program - Push a Proposal to have a peak in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park named as a memorial to our late George Masa.

In the spring of 1960 a committee was named to carry out this club project.  The members of the committee were Dr. Samuel Robinson, Chairman, Mr. Roger Morrow, Mr. George Stephens, and Mr. Henry Arch Nichols.

A set of resolutions were drawn up citing the splendid work of George Masa in stimulating the love of our mountains with his scenic photography and his numerous trips into the remote wilderness areas.  These resolutions were adopted at the membership meeting of the Carolina Mountain Club on May 11, 1960 and the George Masa Memorial Committee began its work of promoting the proposal.  Mr. George McCoy of the Asheville Citizen wrote a splendid editorial in support of our efforts and correspondence was started with government agencies with reference to attaining our objective.  Support was secured from United States Senators Erwin and Jordan who did their best to open the doors of the Department of the Interior to our appeal.  The Board on Geographic Names, considering our appeal, decided to refer the matter to the National Park Service for acceptance of the naming of an unnamed peak in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park as a memorial to George Masa.

A hearing was held on September 22, 1960 at Oconalufty Ranger Station before Mr. Fred J. Overly, Park Superintendent.  Present on behalf of Carolina Mountain Club were George Stephens, Carroll Cromwell, Arch Nichols, Dr. Samuel Robinson and and Mr. Tom Mallonee, representing Congressman Roy A. Taylor.  Mr. Overly's decision reached at this meeting was that the proposal shall meet with the agreement of the North Carolina Park, Parkway and Forest Development Commission before further consideration by the Park Service.

The Western North Carolina Associated Communities at its meeting in October 1960 adopted resolutions favoring the project of the Carolina Mountain Club and copies of these resolutions were forwarded to the proper authorities.

On January 24, 1961 a hearing was granted our committee by the North Carolina Park, Parkway and Forest Development Commission.  Club members present on our behalf consisted of Roger Morrow, Arch Nichols, Percy Carter, and Dr. S. Robinson.  Members of the Commission present were Mr. William Medford, Chairman, Mr. Kelly Bennett, Mr. Frank Brown, Mr. Robert I. Pressley and Mrs. Killian, Secretary.  Also present were Mr. Overly, Mr. Stricklan, Assistant Superintendent Blue Ridge Parkway, Mr. Peter J. Hanlon, Superintendent North Carolina National Forests and Mr. Wilburn, an old acquaintance of George Masa and Mr. John A. Parris of the Asheville Citizen and Times.  After giving us careful attention and asking many questions the members of the Commission voted to adopt resolutions endorsing our proposal.

The Sundays of February 25th and March 5th were devoted to trips for photographing and pinpointing the position of Masa Knob by measuring its exact distance...

Page 01
  masa057b ...from Newfound Gap.  The data and photographs obtained on this trip was transmitted to Mr. Overly for his use and information.

On April 19, 1961 Mr. Luther Shaw, Executive Secretary to Congressman Roy A. Taylor, phoned Dr. S. Robinson from Washington that the Board on Geographic Names had adopted our proposal and that the unnamed peak designated for the Masa memorial would be named Masa Knob.

Several days later the official letter from the Board on Geographic Names was received confirming Mr. Shaw's announcement.  We quote from this letter as follows: -

"This decision of the Board will appear in Decision List 6101, and the entry will read as follows:
Masa Knob:  peak with an elevation of over 6,000 feet, in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, about halfway between Mt. Kephart and Charlies Bunyon [sic]; named for George Masa (died 1933), Japanese photographer whose extensive knowledge of the area acquired through eighteen years association with it, was recognized by appointing him a member of the Nomenclature Committee for the first map of the Park; Swain County, North Carolina and Sevier County, Tennessee; 35º 22' 40" W."

Having succeeded in the attainment of our proposal your committee now asks that it be discharged in recognition that it has completed its task.

In closing, your chairman suggests that a special new committee be appointed to arrange for suitable dedication ceremonies.  People of this committee should be persons having an entree to governmental agencies and political notables.

Letters of thanks should be sent to all organizations and persons whose support and influence has been a factor in attaining our objective.

All correspondence and data in connection with this project is now available to be turned over to the historical records of the Carolina Mountain Club.

Respectfully submitted,
Samuel Robinson
Chmn. George Masa Memorial Committee
Carolina Mountain Club, Inc.
8 May 1961

Page 02
Folder Item Description Thumbnail
8 *  *  * Samuel Robinson papers related to the Masa Knob Project ; Shining Rock Wilderness Project ; and misc. Carolina Mountain Club papers [85 items] *  *  *  *  *
  1
masa058
n.d., circa 1960.
"She's Always on Top."

Newspaper article about the hiking exploits of Margaret Bishop of Canton, NC.


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  2
masa059
10 May 1960.
Letter from Percy B. Ferebee to Samuel Robinson.

Advises Robinson to approach the North Carolina Historical Association and the Western North Carolina Associated Communities organization.

  3
masa060a
11 May 1960.
Carolina Mountain Club Resolution, "On the Naming of a Peak in Commemoration of George Masa" [2 copies].

CAROLINA MOUNTAIN CLUB RESOLUTIONS

About forty years ago there came to Western North Carolina a man slight in build but huge in appreciation of the glories of the outdoors.  The man Japanese by birth and by nationality was Masahara Iisuka who became known by the simplified name of George Masa.  From the very beginning George Masa was awed by the grandeur of our mountain ranges and the unique flora of the region.  He was seized with the longing to climb along the ridges and mountain tops for the pleasure of viewing the handiwork of God from the high places.  He became highly skilled in outdoor photography in order that he might be able to capture the remarkable vistas that are ever changing with the season, the light and the clouds of the sky.  He became a charter member of the Carolina Mountain Club which was organized to pool the resources of mountain lovers for trips into the wilderness of remote sections of Western North Carolina.  The establishment of the Appalachian Trail was one of the early projects of this organization and George Masa led many parties on work trips to clear, blaze and map the course of that trail through the virgin country of the Great Smoky Mountains.  With his artistic skill, patience and perseverance he took photographs of serrated peaks, rhododendron thickets and vistas which to this day are classic examples of art in photography.  Many of his pictures entailed a great deal of hardship in making his way over rough terrain to a good viewpoint and patience in waiting through rain and windstorms for the right lighting conditions to obtain the picture that his artistic sense envisioned.  Many of these expeditions he made in the company of Horace Kephart after whom Mount Kephart in the Smoky Mountains is named.  No doubt the trips into the Smokies of Kephart, Masa and other mountain lovers was a potent influence in the establishment of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

The above account describes what an outstanding service George Masa performed in...

Page 01
  masa060b ...the years before his death in 1933 in interesting the people of this region as well as that of the United States in the magnificence of our physical surroundings and in teaching people to appreciate the simple pleasures of beholding the unspoiled handiwork of God.

So in commemoration of the stranger who stirred us to such depths of love for our wilderness areas we of the Carolina Mountain Club desire that a peak in the Great Smoky Mountains be named in his honor just as Mount Kephart was named in honor of his associate on mountain trips.  The Carolina Mountain Club suggests that the name Masa's Pinnacle be given one of the peaks of what used to be known as "The Fodderstacks" - one of which has been renamed humorously "Charles Bunion", and the other one can be called Masa's Pinnacle.

Be it resolved that copies of these resolutions be made available to newspapers and periodicals and others whom it may concern.  Also be it resolved that a movement be started to enlist the efforts of Chambers of Commerce, Western North Carolina Associated Communities, Conservation and Forestry organizations, civic organizations of various sorts, State government commissions, United States Senators and Congressmen towards bestowing this recognition to a man from a country now friendly to the United States who out of pure love of our own region did so much to make us aware of the beauty that belongs to us.

The foregoing citations and resolutions were adopted at the meeting of the Carolina Mountain Club on the 11th of May 1960.

Carolina Mountain Club, Inc.
Carroll W. Cromwell     PRESIDENT
Mary Emily Harris         SECRETARY

Page 02
  4
masa061
13 May 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Percy B. Ferebee.

Thanks Ferebee for his advice and support [2 copies].

  5
masa062
30 May 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to George W. McCoy.

Thanks McCoy for a 20 May 1960 editorial in the Asheville Citizen [2 copies].

  6
masa063
6 June 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Fred J. Overly.

Encloses copies of letters addressed to the Board on Geographic Names, resolutions passed by the CMC, and other pertinent documents [5 copies].

  7
masa064
6 June 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Senator B. Everett Jordan.

Cover letter accompanying enclosed copies of documents pertinent to the Masa memorial [4 copies].

  8
masa065
6 June 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Senator Sam J. Ervin Jr.

Solicits Ervin's support [5 copies].

  9
masa066
6 June 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to the Board on Geographic Names.

Writes to inform the Board of the CMC's resolution to have a peak named in honor of Masa [3 copies].

  10
masa067a
8 June 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to H. Bueck.

Seeks to garner support for the Masa project [2 copies].

Page 01
  masa067b [same] Page 02
  11
masa068
9 June 1960.
Letter from Percy B. Ferebee to Samuel Robinson.
  12
masa069
10 June 1960.
Letter from H. Bueck to Samuel Robinson.

Promises endorsement by the Western North Carolina Associated Communities of the CMC's proposal.

  13
masa070
10 June 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Roy A. Taylor.

Encloses copies of material sent to the Board on Geographic Names, hopes that Taylor will be able to support the project.

  14
masa071
10 June 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to John A. Parris, Jr.

Writes to solicit Parris' support.

  15
masa072
11 June 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Senator William Medford.

Apprises Senator Medford of the CMC resolution regarding the Masa memorial [3 copies].

  16
masa073
13 June 1960.
Letter from Senator Sam J. Ervin Jr. to Samuel Robinson.

Dear Mr. Robinson:

I have your letter, with enclosures, expressing your interest in having a peak in the Great Smoky Mountains named in honor of the late George Masa.

I appreciate your writing me, and I am also contacting the Department of the Interior, expressing my interest in having a peak in the Great Smoky Mountains named in honor of the late George Masa.

With all kind wishes, I am

Sincerely yours,
Sam J. Ervin, Jr.

  17
masa074
16 June 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Carlos C. Campbell.

Solicits the assistance of the Great Smoky Mountains Conservation Association [3 copies].

  18
masa075
16 June 1960.
Letter from J. O. Kilmartin to Samuel Robinson.

Advises Robinson on proposed changes to the name, "Masa's Pinnacle."

  19
masa076a
16 June 1960.
Letter from Senator B. Everett Jordan to Samuel Robinson.

Dear Dr. Robinson:

Thank you very much for your letter and the enclosed information about efforts to have the Department of the Interior name a peak in the Great Smoky Mountains in honor of the late George Masa.

I think this is a most commendable project, and I am enclosing for your information a copy of a letter that I have written to the Secretary of the Interior concerning this matter.

With all best regards,

Sincerely,
B. Everett Jordan, USS

  masa076b 16 June 1960.
Letter from Senator B. Everett Jordan to Secretary of the Interior Fred A. Seaton [copy].

Dear Mr. Secretary:

It has come to my attention that the Carolina Mountain Club of Asheville, North Carolina, has requested that the Department of Interior to name a peak in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in honor of the late George Masa.

I would like to ask that this request be .given serious consideration in view of the outstanding contributions Mr. Masa made to Western. North Carolina and particularly the mountain attractions of that beautiful area.

Thanking you, and with best regards,

Sincerely,
B. Everett Jordan, USS

Enclosure
  20
masa077a
20 June 1960.
Letter from Senator Sam J. Ervin Jr. to Samuel Robinson.

Dear Mr. Robinson:

Referring further to you interest in honoring George Masa by naming a peak in the Great Smoky Mountains for him, I am enclosing copy of a letter just received from Mr. J. O. Kilmartin, Executive Secretary, Domestic Geographic names, Department of the Interior, in reply to my letter of June 13 to him, which is self-explanatory.

With all kind wishes, I am Sincerely yours,

Sam J. Ervin, Jr.

  masa077b

16 June 1960.
Letter from J. O. Kilmartin to Senator Sam J. Ervin Jr.

Dear Senator Ervin:

Your letter of June 13 expressing an interest in the Carolina Mountain Club's proposal to honor George Masa by naming a peak in the Great Smoky Mountains for him will be placed with our file on the case. We appreciate this expression of your interest and will let you know when action has been taken by the Domestic Names Committee of the Board on Geographic Names.

Sincerely yours,

J. O. Kilmartin
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Domestic Geographic Names

Enclosure
  21
masa078
21 June 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to the Board on Geographic Names.

Writes in reply to a letter from J. O. Kilmartin.  Informs the Board of the CMC's decision regarding the naming of a peak in honor of Masa.

  22
masa079
22 June 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Carlos C. Campbell.

Encloses a copy of a letter sent to the Board on Geographic Names.

  23
masa080
22 June 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Fred J. Overly.

Encloses a copy of Robinson's letter to the Board on Geographic Names.

  24
masa081
27 June 1960.
Letter from J. O. Kilmartin to Samuel Robinson.

Thanks Robinson for his letter of 21 June, regarding nomenclature.

  25
masa082
28 June 1960.
Letter from Fred J. Overly to Samuel Robinson.

States that he is currently unable to render a decision on the matter.

  26
masa083
6 July 1960.
Letter from Carlos C. Campbell to Samuel Robinson.

Dear Sam:

Your letters of June 16 and June 22 were referred to our Place Names Committee, of which Brockway Crouch is chairman. Brockway and other members of the committee studied the correspondence concerning your desire to name a part of Charlies Bunion for the late George Masa. They also reviewed the position of our Board concerning previous efforts to change existing place names in the Great Smokies.

The report of the committee is attached. Although it is not the action that you requested, I am confident that you will recognize the soundness of the Committee's recommendations.

Copies of the Committee's report are also being sent to the Board on Geographic Names and to National Park officials in Gatlinburg, Richmond and Washington.

Should we ever resort to the practice of changing established names to "honor" various persons it would become an empty and meaningless honor.

Sincerely,
Carlos C. Campbell
SECRETARY

  27
masa084
6 July 1960.
Resolution of the Place Names Committee of the Great Smoky Mountains Conservation Association, Brockway Crouch, Chairman.

Critical of efforts to alter existing placenames.  Recommends that efforts be made to choose an alternate location.

Enclosure
  28
masa085
11 July 1960.
Letter from Assistant Secretary of the Interior Roger Ernst to Senator B. Everett Jordan.

Promises to give the senator's request serious consideration.

  29
masa086
18 July 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Fred J. Overly.

Mentions the interest shown by Senators Ervin and Jordan.

  30
masa087a
18 July 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to the National Park Service.

Gentleman: -

Mr. Roger Ernst, Assistant Secretary of Interior, has informed our Senator Jordan that the proposal from the Carolina Mountain Club to have a peak in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park named as a memorial to the late George Masa has been forwarded to you for study and acceptance.

You will note from the enclosed copy of the resolutions adopted by the Carolina Mountain Club the reasons that prompted our request.

Horace Kephart (after whom Mt. Kephart is named) and George Masa were very closely associated in their activities of exploring and photographing vistas in the Great Smoky Mountains.  Mr. Kephart died about a year before George Masa passed away and was buried in a private cemetery in Bryson City.  When George Masa died it was felt that the two should be buried side by side in an accessible place in the Great Smoky Mountains just as Dr. Mitchell was buried at the top of Mount Mitchell.  The National Park Service was asked for permission to carry out this idea.  Permission was refused.

The two men, Kephart and Masa, made a well-balanced team for promoting interest in the establishment of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.  Kephart was the writer and publicist.  Masa was the mountain guide and photographer on the trips they made into the wilderness areas of the rugged peaks.

The honoring of the memory of George Masa is not something that had just occurred to us.  We have been carrying it in our minds for the last twenty years.  It was necessary for us to find some geographical feature that did not have an official name.  Finally we found that a peak answering these qualifications was available four miles out on the State Line from Newfound Gap.

When I first visited the locality twenty years ago there was a board sign (probably erected by the CCC) designating the two peaks of the Charlies Bunion area as "The Fodderstacks."  All descriptions of the terrain state that the two are separate peaks.  There is a sharp steep notch separating them.  For instance let me cite you the description from the Appalachian Trail Manual of 1950.  Quoting from the detailed trail data of the section Newfound Gap to Davenport Gap on page 9-49 "At 3.85 Mi. swing to Tenn. side and pass around left side of precipitous (lower) peak of Charlies Bunion at 4m . . . Beyond cross to N.C. side, touch state line at 4.05 m, and pass around the higher peak by Charlies Bunion.  The lower or west peak is sometimes called "Fodder Stack"; the eastern or higher peak being called "Charlies Bunion."  "Descend, . . . to Dry Sluice Gap at 4.3m".

Page 01
  masa087b We have a great deal of information in support of our proposal to honor this man from a friendly nation.  This should not be regarded as the pet idea of a local or state group.  This memorializing of this man is even beyond national scope - it is international. 

Hoping that you will give this matter your full consideration, we beg to be,

Respectfully yours,
CAROLINA MOUNTAIN CLUB

Page 02
  31
masa088a
22 July 1960.
Letter from Congressman Roy A. Taylor to Samuel Robinson.

Dear Mr. Robinson:

Pardon my delay in answering your letter concerning the naming of a mountain in The Great Smoky Mountains National Park in honor of George Masa. The material and facts contained in the editorial and the Carolina Mountain Club resolution appear to justify such action. I will be glad to work with your group and with our Senators in securing the requested results,

Enclosed is copy of a letter which I have written to Mr. William G. Watt, Chairman, Board on Geographic Fames, Department of the Interior, Washington, D. C., in support of your request.

Sincerely yours,

Roy A. Taylor, M.C.

  masa088b 22 July 1960.
Letter from Congressman Roy A. Taylor to William G. Watt.

Endorses the CMC's proposal.

Enclosure
  33
masa089
25 July 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Congressman Roy A. Taylor.

Writes to bring Congressman Taylor abreast of the latest developments.

  34
masa090
25 July 1960.
Letter from Senator William Medford to Samuel Robinson.

Offers advice and support to the CMC.

  35
masa091a
2 August 1960.
Letter from Congressman Roy A. Taylor to Samuel Robinson.

Apprises Robinson of communications between Congressman Taylor and representatives of the Department of the Interior.

  masa091b n.d., circa 2 August 1960.
Letter from J. O. Kilmartin to Congressman Roy A. Taylor.

Enclosed in Congressman Taylor's letter to Samuel Robinson of 2 August 1960.

 

Enclosure
  36
masa092
4 August 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Congressman Roy A. Taylor.

States the CMC's intention to pursue the naming of a hitherto unnamed peak.

  37
masa093
4 August 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to J. O. Kilmartin.

Brings Kilmartin up-to-date on recent developments [3 copies].

  38
masa094a
4 August 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Conrad L. Wirth.

Writes Firth to inform him of the CMC's resolution to amend their choice of peak [4 copies].

Page 01
  masa094b   Page 02
  39
masa095
4 August 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Senator William Medford.

Thanks Medford for his interest in the Masa memorial [2 copies].

  40
masa096
5 August 1960.
Letter from Congressman Roy A. Taylor to Samuel Robinson.

Proposes a meeting with Robinson and Fred J. Overly after Congress adjourns in September.

  41
masa097
8 August 1960.
Letter from Senator William Medford to Samuel Robinson.

Welcomes Robinson to appear before the North Carolina National Park, Parkway and Forests Development Commission at its October meeting.

  42
masa098a
n.d., circa 8 August 1960.
Untitled bulletin of the Masa Memorial Committee.

The George Masa Memorial Committee of Carolina Mountain Club is planning to attend in a body the quarterly meeting of the North Carolina National Park, Parkway and Forest Development Commission at the headquarters office in Waynesville, Tuesday at 10:00 a.m. The committee will ask the Commission to recommend the club's proposal to have an unnamed peek in the vicinity of Mount Kephart in the Smoky Mountains Park named as a memorial to George Masa the indefatigable mountaineer and scenic photographer. George Masa's pictures were among the first to tell the world about the beauties of the Great Smoky Mountains.

George Masa who died in 1933 at the age of 51 came to the United States from Japan in the early years of the century to study mining engineering at the University of California. His college career was suddenly terminated by the death of his father in Japan. After working for some time at engineering work in Colorado he was induced to come to Asheville in 1915 among a group of foreigners recruited by the late Fred Seely for service in Grove Park Inn. With this group George took extensive mountain trips and became fired with enthusiasm for the unique beauties of the mountain region centering around Asheville. To capture the magnificent views afforded on his trips he perfected himself in the details of scenic photography. He opened a photographic studio in downtown Asheville known as the Plateau Studio, With the meagre income derived from his professional photography he enabled himself to go out on trips into remote points of the wilderness areas. The Craggies and the Smokies were his favorite subjects for thrilling photographs. He joined forces with Horace Kephart who had his headquarters at Bryson City on many expeditions into the Great Smoky Mountains, This ideal partnership between Kephart, the publicist and Masa, the mountain man and photographer, was no doubt a potent influence in drawing the attention of the nation to the possibilities of the establishment of the Great Smoky Mountains national Park.

George Masa was a charter member of Carolina Mountain Club and a moving spirit in its activities. The club had been studying the project of commemorating...

Page 01
  masa098b ...the work of George Masa in a suitable manner for some twenty years. Last May a resolution was adopted proposing that a peak in the Great Smoky Mountains Park be named in his memory just as Horace Kephart was memorialized by the naming of Mount Kephart.

Quoting from the resolutions the citation reads as follows:
"From the very beginning George Masa was awed by the grandeur of our mountain ranges and the unique flora of the region. He was seized with the longing to climb along the ridges and mountain tops for the pleasure of viewing the handiwork of God from the high places. He became highly skilled in outdoor photography in order that he might be able to capture the remarkable vistas that are every changing with the season, the light and the clouds of the sky. He became a charter member of the Carolina Mountain Club which was organized to pool the resources of mountain lovers for trips into the wilderness of remote sections of Western North Carolina, The establishment of the Appalachian Trail was one of the early projects of this organization and George Masa led many parties on work trips to clear, blaze and map the course of that trail through the virgin country of the Great Smoky Mountains. With his artistic skill, patience and perserverance [sic] he took photographs of serrated peaks, rhododendron thickets and vistas which to this day are classic examples of art in photography. Many of his pictures entailed a great deal of hardship in making his way over rough terrain to a good viewpoint and patience in waiting through rain and windstorms for the right lighting conditions to obtain the picture that his artistic sense envisioned."

These resolutions were presented as a petition to the Board on Geographic Names, Department of the Interior, The request was then referred to the National Park Service and it was assigned to Fred J, Overly, Park Superintendent, at Gatlinburg to make a field study of the matter. At its October meeting the Western North Carolina Associated Communities adopted unanimously resolutions endorsing the project.

Members of the George Masa Memorial Committee are Dr, Samuel Robinson, Chairman, Henry Arch Nichols, Roger Morrow, George M. Stephens and F. Piercy Carter, Club president.

Page 02
  masa098c A hearing in regard to the naming of a peak as a memorial to the late George Masa will be held Thursday at 3:30 p.m. in the Qconalufty Ranger Station on the North Carolina side of the Smoky Mountains Park.

The proposal to commemorate the widely-known Japanese mountaineer and scenic photographer of the 1920s has been sponsored by the Carolina Mountain Club of Asheville aid has been under consideration by the Board on Geographic Names the past few months. The request to name a peak in the park four miles east of New Found Gap has been referred to the National Park Service for acceptance. Fred J. Overly, Superintendent of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park will conduct the hearing and members of Carolina Mountain Club will present their case before his. Among the club members planning to attend the hearing are Arch Nichols, Piercy Carter, Carroll Cromwell, club president and Dr. Samuel Robinson, Chairman George Masa Memorial Committee. Congressman Roy Taylor who has been greatly interested in promotion of the project and unable to attend because of a conflicting engagement will be represented by Tom Mallonee, his Resident Secretary.

Page 03
  43
masa099
10 August 1960.
Letter from E. T. Sawyer[?] to Samuel Robinson.

Acknowledges receipt of letters from Robinson, promises to forward them to National Park field offices.

  44
masa100
22 August 1960.
Letter from J. O. Kilmartin to Samuel Robinson.

Requests the committee to pinpoint the position of the proposed Masa Knob.

  45
masa101a
30 August 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to J. O. Kilmartin.

Encloses a topographic map with the proposed Masa Knob identified, as well as a copy of the Virginia T. Lathrop article, "The Little Jap" [3 copies].

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  masa101b   Page 02
  46
masa102
30 August 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Carlos C. Campbell.

Encloses a copy of a letter sent to the Board on Geographic Names.

  47
masa103
31 August 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Congressman Roy A. Taylor.

Writes to arrange a joint meeting with Congressman Taylor and Fred J. Overly.

  48
masa104
1 September 1960.
Letter from Congressman Roy A. Taylor to Samuel Robinson.

Writes to reschedule a meeting with Robinson and Fred J. Overly.

  49
masa105
1 September 1960.
Letter from Carlos C. Campbell to Samuel Robinson.

Writes to clarify the position of the Great Smoky Mountains Conservation Association regarding the Masa memorial proposal.

  50
masa106
6 September 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Fred J. Overly.

Writes to arrange a meeting with Overly [4 copies].

  51
masa107
8 September 1960.
Letter from Fred J. Overly to Samuel Robinson.

Schedules meeting with Robinson and Congressman Taylor.

  52
masa108
12 September 1960.
Letter from J. O. Kilmartin to Samuel Robinson.

Informs Robinson of recent and pending actions.

  53
masa109
12 September 1960.
Letter from Congressman Roy A. Taylor to Fred J. Overly.

Writes to reschedule a meeting with Overly and Samuel Robinson.

  54
masa110
15 September 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to J. O. Kilmartin.

Writes to keep Kilmartin, of the Board of Geographic Names, abreast of the latest developments regarding the move to name a peak in honor of Masa [3 copies].

  55
masa111
23 September 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Fred J. Overly.

Dispatches a copy of the Virginia T. Lathrop article for Overly's consideration [2 copies].

  56
masa112

26 September 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Senator William Medford.

Reports on developments in the Masa memorial case [2 copies].

  57
masa113

27 September 1960.
Letter from Corinne A. Killian to Samuel Robinson.

Welcomes Robinson, or a designated representative of the CMC, to the next quarterly meeting of the North Carolina National Park, Parkway and Forests Development Commission.

  58
masa114

5 October 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Richard K. Degenhardt.

Updates Degenhardt regarding the progress made in the Masa memorial project.

  59
masa115

12 October 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Senator William Medford.

Discusses relations between the CMC and the North Carolina National Park, Parkway and Forests Development Commission [2 copies].

  61
masa116a
 

3 November 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to J. O. Kilmartin.

Informs Kilmartin of the WNCAC's endorsement, encloses newspaper clipping [3 copies].

  masa116b 25 October 1960.
"Travel Body Established by WNCAC."

Article in the Asheville Citizen.

Enclosure

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  62
masa117

4 November 1960.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Fred J. Overly.

Refers Overly, Superintendent of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, to the testimony of Mr. Verne Rhoades of Asheville, a retired Supervisor of Pisgah National Forest [2 copies].

  63
masa118
10 November 1960.
Letter from Fred J. Overly to Samuel Robinson.

Apprises Robinson of the proceedings of the North Carolina Parks, Parkway and Forest Development Commission.

  64
masa119
16 November 1960.
Letter from J. O. Kilmartin to Samuel Robinson.

Informs Robinson that the Board on Geographic Names has deferred their decision until the National Park Service presents its findings.

  65
masa120

4 January 1961.
Letter from Senator William Medford to Samuel Robinson.

Informs Robinson that the issue of the Masa memorial has been deferred until January.

  66
masa121

6 January 1961.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Senator William Medford.

Thanks Senator Medford for his courtesy, states Robinson's intention to present the CMC's case at the January meeting [2 copies].

  67
masa122

13 April 1961.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to J. O. Kilmartin.

Requests information on possible developments at the Board on Geographic Names [2 copies].

  68
masa123
13 April 1961.
Letter from Samuel Robinson to Congressman Roy A. Taylor.

Informs Congressman Taylor of the latest developments in the Masa case, including approval of the National Park Service.

  69
masa124
18 April 1961.
Letter from Congressman Roy A. Taylor to J. O. Kilmartin.

Endorses the CMC's proposal.

  70
masa125
1 June 1961.
Bulletin issued by the United States Department of Agriculture.

Explains the new National Forests' logo.

  71
masa126
5 June 1961.
Section Two of the Asheville Times.

Includes features on the Craggy Mountains.  Illustrated.


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  72
masa127
9 June 1961.
Letter from Dorothy W. Lunsford to Samuel Robinson.

Expresses the thanks of the CMC for Robinson's efforts as chairman of the Masa Memorial Committee.

  73
masa128
20 March 1962.
Letter from John Sieker to Samuel Robinson.

Thanks Robinson for his interest in Pisgah National Forest.  Refers specifically to "the establishment of a wild area in the Pigeon River watershed."

  74
masa129a

LET'S GO
Quarterly News Bulletin of the Carolina Mountain Club
Vol. 20, No. 2              April 1962        

Concern Expressed by Dedicated National Leader

"Democracy should accomodate a great diversity of tastes.  There should be bits of wilderness, the edges of which people can reach by car.  Roadside picnic areas fit some needs.  Some want comfortable beds by night though they tramp the heights by day.  The demands vary.  Yet certain it is that we can have no wilderness where wildlife flourishes, unless 'civilization' is kept out.  If 'civilization' is brought no closer than the fringe of these wilderness areas, one who can walk only 100 yards may enter the sacred precints [sic] and feel and see the wilderness that once possessed America.  Then even invalids may experience wonder and beauty beyond expression.

"Of all our national parks, the Smokies is in these respects close to a model.  Civilization centers mostly in towns like Gatlinburg, Tenn.  The hollows, streams and ridges of the park are largely unmolested.  That should be the aim in all other parks, in all other wilderness areas.  Yet as we enter the 1960s the wilderness of America that is left is more and more shaped and designed for the conveniences of mass recreation.  If that trend continues, we will be the victims of 'civilization.'  Man will have no chance to escape.  Wherever he goes - unless he goes to sea - the crowd will follow him by car." - Justice William O. Douglas from My Wilderness: East to Katahdin (chapter VII - The Smokies).

And Locally a Plea for Action on Proposed Shining Rock Wild Area

Have you written to the North Carolina National Forests, Box 731, Asheville, N.C., to request that the spectacular high country (above the 5,000 foot contour) in Haywood County extending South from Cold Mountain to the Blue Ridge Parkway at Silvermine Bald be preserved in its natural state?

Since our November meeting, the Carolina Mountain Club has been earnestly seeking, in cooperation with Dr. Charles Wharton of Nature Conservancy and others, to save the Shining Rock Ledge from motorized exploitation.  In the past we have enjoyed many hikes into this area of peaks of over 6,000 elevation such as Silvermine Bald, Big Sam, Black Balsam Knob, Tennent Mtn., Shining Rock, and Cold Mtn.  The local Forest officials, in consideration of our request, have delayed their plans in the matter and they went out of their way to confer on a non-work day, Saturday, March 3, with Piercy Carter, Roger Morrow and Dr. Wharton; but, their recommendation to the Regional Forester is to be for construction at Ivestor Gap of a new recreation area with additional roads and extensive parking for cars.

(continued)

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  masa129b Considering that the tops of most of our major ranges in the South have already been allotted to paved roads for the enjoyment of the prodigious motorized public, including the adjacent Pisgah Ledge and the Richland Balsams, can those of us who truly love nature and care to preserve one of the few remaining ranges of over 6,000 in a natural condition for future generations to enjoy afford to sit apathetically by while Shining Rock Ledge is forfeited to the bulldozer?  We think not, but unless enough individuals and organizations step forward immediately with letters requesting the Wild Area, the Shining Rock ridgeline will soon join the graveyard of paved and developed mountain tops in the Southern Appalachians.

In January, a few individuals wrote to the Forest Service to ask that the area be saved.  On the 25th, our Council petitioned the Forest Service to set aside this high mountain mass forming the Pigeon River as a Wild Area.  At a CMC meeting called March 3 for the purpose of voting a formal resolution, it was discussed with Dr. Wharton and unanimously passed.  This was subsequently forwarded on March 12 with appropriate letters to  each of the three Forest Service offices (NCNFs, the Regional Forester, U.S. Forest Service, Peachtree-Seventh Bldg., Atlanta 23, Ga.; and The Chief, USFS, Washington 25, D.C.).

In view of the pending NCNFs' recommendation against a Wild Area and for development on the Ledge, letters from our friends or their organizations at this time to the Regional Forester at Atlanta, urging establishment of Shining Rock Ridge as a Wild Area under Regulation U-2, should be particularly effective.  The Club's letters requested the Regional Forester and Chief to take a broad view of the need for Wild Areas in the East, as contrasted with the local objective of constructing roads, parking and other facilities to count as many motorized visitors in apreviously unspoiled area as possible.  We hope all conservationist [sic] will let the Forest Service hear from them, and we feel the Regional Forester and Chief will rule in our favor.

New Members

Welcome to our "Foreign Legion" are Mrs. E. A. (Florence) Gans of Mergans Lane, Hendersonville and Mrs. Alice L. Andrews of Flat Rock.  We hope more of our hikers will get to know them soon.  No stranger to CMCers is Jim Maddox, several of us having know Jim as the 2nd man of Rev. Rufus Morgan's "One Man Hiking Club" in Franklin.  Jim, his wife Mim (Mary Frances), their children Alan, Ann and Mark are now living on Texas Road Ext., Montreat, where Jim is teaching at Montreat College.  R. Alan Mebane, naturalist for the Blue Ridge Parkway in N.C., his wife Jeanie and their two little ones, Melissa and Chris, are interesting new members.  Alan has had previous assignments in parks of Utah, Nevada and Wyoming.  Their address is Route 2, Box 1132, Asheville.

Dues ? ? . . . Anyone ? ? ?

Delinquent and/or 1962 dues are still welcomed by the Club Treasurer and will be properly acknowledged with a membership card when forwarded to the Club's P. O. Box 68, Asheville, N. C.

Page 02
  masa129c

The Reporter's Notebook

Graybeard - December 17

This is a trip close to our neighboring towns of Black Mountain and Montreat.  It is especially good for winter, except at that time it is frequently favored with fog, rain, snow, wind, etc. - this year being no exception.  Hiking begins in earnest near the old Mt. Mitchell motor road, which was a one way toll road with turnouts.  Dr. Lyngholm reports a very small group of 5 bravely marched through an all day rain to eat a soggy lunch somewhere among the laurel thickets.

Locust Ridge - December 31

An interesting report from Elizabeth Parker brings us the beauty of this trip near the Blue Ridge Parkway and Craggies.  Eight hardy individuals set forth in not-too-promising weather to climb to the Peach Orchard on Bullhead Mt. via Locust Ridge.  Snow on the ground at Big Ivy Campground caused them to park and walk several miles before the usual starting place.  The hikers traveled up and up on dim roads, past deserted buildings and into the woods on a trail following the stream - a picturesque mountain winter landscape.  On ascending, the snow became deeper, the air cooler, and the white covering heavier on all the trees.  The Parkway was reached and after several snow pictures of its quiet, undisturbed beauty the group dropped lower, out of the winds and built a fire for the lunch gathering.  After scattered blue spots in the sky, the clouds rolled in darkly and our members turned thoughts toward home and warmth.

Mt. Pisgah - January 7

We are indebted to Meta Deininger for this pictorial account of our hardy winter hikers' day on Asheville's favorite background - Mt. Pisgah and the Rat.... "The hike to Pisgah started under dull, gray skies, but, as if recognizing the hikers' achievement in reaching the summit, the sun shone forth in a brilliant blue sky to reflect in the billions of ice crystal of the rime frost coating the vegetation and the tower. On the upward trip numerous fox and deer tracks were spotted in the light covering of snow. Once a large deer crashed across the hikers' path about forty feet behind them. While lunch was being eaten at the-summit, a remarkable cloud effect formed very high up in the direction of Cold Mountain and challenged the camera fans present to catch it on film. (We wonder did they?) Dr. Robinson gave an impressive demonstration of his inborn compass in finding a short-cut down precipitous forested slopes on the way back."

Rocky Knob - January 14

A very large turnout (34) for this half day outing reached from the Riceville Road back of Oteen and then to Shope's Creek Road just below the Parkway in the Swannanoa Valley. .The trip began near a fine stream, then through deep woods, up steep slopes slippery with a bit of ice and frozen leaves. One or two junior members were fortunate in obtaining a piggy-back ride most of the way. We had a view from the ridge on top, but the atmosphere had placed winter's chill and-grayness on the distant hills.

Page 03
  masa129d Black Mountain - January 21

Around 17 hikers were rewarded by a pleasant day with sun most of the time, but snow was still evident on the North slopes. This is an interesting ramble across ridges in Pisgah National Forest, starting near Pink Beds Picnic area and along Club Gap Trail. Our lunchtime stop offered breathtaking views from a cliffside looking West and South near the Davidson River side, including the Parkway toward Beech Gap, Pilot Mt. and Looking Glass Rock. The route we followed comes to the main road at Forest Service maintenance area.

Shumont— February 4

This trip was taken on a wonderfully clear day, with fine views in almost every direction. Considering the long, upward pull, the 14 hikers returned fairly early. What has happened to the old days when a leisurely lunch and sun bath was enjoyed along with the view? Shumont's wide view gives us a bird's eye look at Hickory Nut Gorge, Chimney Rock Cliffs, Sugarloaf, Lake Lure and the Blacks, as well as the North Carolina flat Piedmont in the East.

Charlie's Bunion - February 11

We started the trip at Newfound Gap, where we met our members and visitors from Haywood Co. At that time the weather was rather clear with fine views. Soon we came upon treacherous ice. patches along, the trail where sunlight seldom reaches. The hikers came through remarkably well considering the fact that now and then some were seen doing an unexpected kind of "twist", which had no relation to the current dance fad, except - the motion. We met a group of 20 explorer scouts. and their two leaders from Spartanburg who had spent the previous night at Ice Water Spring shelter in zero weather and reported all slept in the shelter which was designed for around 6 persons. Beyond Masa Mt. and near Charlie's Bunion there was a wonderland of rime ice, with icy fringes extending almost 6 inches on some branches giving them a brush-like appearance. We had lunch in a sheltered spot near the Bunion-before the sun went under snow clouds and we had a small snow storm which we had seen moving in from Mt. LeConte. The drivers returned to Newfound Gap and others hiked on to Kephart Prong where they were met.

Spivey Mountain - February 18

On this half-day trip, Jerome Dykeman reports 30 persons, including many families and children who enjoyed the trek through open pastures, ridge meadows, to the summit of Deaverview and then to Spivey with the fire lookout tower. Due to hazy weather there was no view, which was a disappointment, since Spivey offers a clear weather panorama showing the City of Asheville in the middle distance with a fine backdrop of the towering Craggies, Cedar Cliff and the route of the Blue Ridge Parkway toward Mitchell. Also, northwestward to Bluff Mountain-Hot Springs vicinity over the French Broad River Valley.

Lane's Pinnacle - February 25

From Dot Lunsford we learn that "though our clothing was quite dampened by the time we returned from Lane's Pinnacle, the spirit of 23 hikers was not Bernard Elias led 20 members and 3 guests to the summit though the weather was unpromising from the start. Lunch was enjoyed (?) in the rhododendron and laurel 'rooms' where the temperature never rose above 36 degrees according to our thermometer bearer, Arch Nichols. The magnificent panorama was not shown, but good company more than compensated for the uncooperative weather."

Page 04
  masa129e Busbee Mountain - March 4

Ole J. Pluvius threatened again, but 8 defiant hikers enjoyed a well planned trip by a new route to Busbee Mountain. Ken Durant took us up the Rose Hill (Shrine Club) Road from Route 74, and we circled the North summit of Busbee from the Baldwin Gap road forks. We outsmarted the elements this time, too, and got back to the cars just before a cold drizzle claimed possession of the mountain top.

Naked Place and Haynes Top - March 11

This trip was "chickened out" at the Post Office steps due to rain... rain...and more rain, which was accused of driving 6 good members, including the hike leader, Pope Barrow (and his hiking valor) back to bed.

A.T. Work Trip - March 18

This section of the Appalachian Trail between Rice Creek Gap and Devil's Fork Gap was in better condition than expected, due to good efforts of Jerry Stern and Scout troop who worked through about a year ago. Moderately cold, but bright sunny weather brought out a vigorous crew of .17 trail workers. Old Sol glistened brightly for the entire day, turning the remaining snow drifts and bubbling streams into flashing spots of glitter. At the higher elevations we were often rewarded with sweeping views of Big Bald Little Bald, with a fading view of the Blacks. The workers labored mightily, chopping, sawing, log-rolling and finally leaving a reasonably clear throughway. The only mishap reported was Herb Carpenter's "breeches" trouble... that unexpected split seam which failed to survive log rolling and deep knee bending. He had discovered, meanwhile, that his belt was omitted due to early morning oversight and sleepy-eyed departure. His "downfall" was soon corrected by piecemeal donations from CMCers who came to the rescue with rope, twine, leather shoe lace, etc. and the final "hold up" was completed by use of the loop and rope-over-the shoulder technique.

Statistically Speaking

Jerome Dykeman reports that since January 1, 1962, on the first seven hikes, we have averaged twenty members or visitors per hike. Also, for the entire year of 1961, there were 46 hikes with an average of 17 per hike. Let's keep this average going up and up.

Carolina Mountain Club Patches

The Club has ordered CMC patches which should arrive during the next quarter. Check with our Secretary, Dot Lunsford.

Wild Flower Season Just Around the Corner

Charles Lindsley says that the Bat Cave area has more variety in wild flowers than any location he has found. The valley near-Catawba Falls should present a fine display ... so check your bulletin and come on out.

Page 05
  masa129f

Personal Mention

Marguerite and Piercy Carter are the proud grandparents of Kimberly Carter Johnson, born March 13 in Paducah, Ky. to their daughter and son-in-law, Sally and George Johnson, former CMC members. Adriana Webb, a long-time friend of the family, spent a few days with the Johnsons about the time the baby arrived.

Herb Carpenter reports a March visit to Mobile, Alabama and that the azalea gardens were at the peak of their usual display of color and natural beauty. Doug Sanford and family had a brief Christmas visit to the old home town of Bristol, New Hampshire and report snow, skiing and winter sports at their best.

We extend to Jerome Dykeman our sympathy on the passing of his sister, Mrs. E. C. (Helen Dykeman) Gregory of Asheville. Mrs. Gregory died after a lengthy illness and although she was not a member, we shall miss her as a friend of CMC.

Nancy Julian, "foreign legion" Club member from Winston-Salem, came up for the Black Mountain trip oh January 21. Others of the "foreign legion" . . . come on up!

Seen on the ski slopes of Alexander's Gataloochee Ranch, CMC members Andy Martenson and Frances Chamberlin. Spectators - Tom Reese, Norma and Nina Forbes and Dot Lunsford. Andy's skill was noted by a reporter from the Atlanta Journal whose article in a subsequent Sunday Magazine supplement gave special mention about this. Tom was anxious to try out the new slope, but didn't have time.

The handsome likeness of Bernard L. Elias, Jr. was included in the Asheville Citizen, March 6, in connection with Naval Reserve activities and a plan presently under his responsibility for arranging the airlift and recruiting of air reservists who will take training at Atlanta.

Dr. Timothy Takaro, associate chief of staff in charge of research and chief of the Cardio-Vascular Section of Surgery at the Veterans Hospital at Oteen, leaves on March 28 for a three months stay in Moscow. This is a study fellowship which is part of a U.S. - U.S.S.R. cultural and scientific exchange. For the most part, Dr. Takaro will be engaged in the Scientific Research Institute for Experimental Surgical Apparatus and Instruments. He will make special study of the developments in stapling devices for blood vessels, heart, lungs, gastro-intestinal tract and bones. He will take with him American equipment and medical techniques along similar lines. The doctor also plans to visit other medical centers in Leningrad and Kiev and also attend the International Cardio-Vascular Society European Section meeting at Stockholm in July. We congratulate Dr. Takaro on this splendid opportunity before him!

Page 06
  masa129g Asheville-Biltmore College Botanical Garden

Members of CMC are urged to participate by individual membership in the Asheville-Biltmore College Botanical Garden project. Many CMCers have already joined this worthy endeavor to have a local concentration of the great variety of plants found in this Southern Appalachian Mountain region. District Naturalist, R. Alan Mebane, of the Blue Ridge Parkway, who recently joined the ranks of CMC, gave a most interesting illustrated talk at Asheville-Biltmore College on Tuesday evening, March 20. His subject was "Why?" and he explained the effect of glaciers and changing climate upon the plant life of Western North Carolina and how this-section has come to have the greatest variety of vegatation [sic] found in Eastern North America. Naturalist Mebane has had special training in geology. The program was sponsored by Asheville-Biltmore Botanical Gardens and many of our members were present.

C.M.C. Cabin Almost Ours

The Cabin Committee, headed by Jerome Dykeman, has located a cabin in the Big Ivy community near Barnardsville and Dillingham, and is negotiating with the U.S. Forest Service for a lease. The Committee hopes that by the time you receive this news, they will have the cabin rented for one year. The cabin is located in a beautiful woodland spot near the rushing waters of Big Butte Creek. All who have seen the cabin are very enthusiastic with ideas and plans for many happy times for all members of the Club. You will be notified of future developments.

The Council wishes to thank all who participated in this issue.

Page 07
  75
masa130
3 April 1962.
Letter from J. K. Vessey to Samuel Robinson.

Apprises Robinson of developments related to the Shining Rock Mountain recreation area.

  76
masa131
4 April 1962.
"The Way to Scotch a Rumor is to Out with the Facts."

Editorial in the Asheville Times.


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  77
masa132
12 April 1962.
Letter from Congressman Roy A. Taylor to Richard K. Degenhardt.  Discusses a forthcoming camping tour of the United States by Sir Edmund Hillary.
  78
masa133
18 April 1962.
Letter from Richard K. Degenhardt to Congressman Roy A. Taylor.

Refers to a proposed tour by Sir Edmund Hillary.

  79
masa134
9 May 1962.
Letter from Frank W. Woods to Peter Hanlon, Peter Hanlon to A. E. Radford.

Arranges a tour of Shining Rock, including list of guests.

  80
masa135a
18 May 1962.
Letter from Harvey Broome to "Roger."

Summarizes his findings during a tour of Shining Rock.

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  masa135b   Page 02
  81
masa136
 
n.d., circa May 1962.
Letter from "Roger" to Samuel Robinson.

Hints that there is "good support" for the Shining Rock project.

  82
masa137
Photocopied page from the Forest Service Manual, November 1958 Edition.
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Folder

Item

Description Thumbnail
9 *  *  * Misc. items related to George Masa, including his hand-drawn map ; letter to Masa from a Mrs. Shepherd, secretary to B. S. Colburn ; notes on Masa [6 items] *  *  *  *  *
  1
masa138a
15 October 1932.
Letter from Eunice K. Shepherd (Mrs.) to George Masa.

As secretary to B. S. Colburn, Mrs. Shepherd writes to apprise Masa of the Colburn's travel plans, and to return his map of the Great Smoky Mountains' portion of the Appalachian Trail.

  masa138b Enclosure.
Map of the Appalachian Trail as it crosses the Great Smoky Mountains National Park,  by George Masa   "Red dotted line is A.T."

[Key:]  Unaka Springs to Devils Fork Gap
Devils Fork Gap to Hot Springs
Hot Springs to Waterville
Waterville to Tapoco - Entire length of Smokies
Tapoco to Vesser
Silers Bald to Wesser
Wesser to Fch Knob. (Nantahala National Forest)

Enclosure
  2
masa139
n.d.
Hand-drawn map of Cold Mountain trail route, by George Masa [?].
  3
masa140
n.d.
Portion from a letter, author and recipient unknown.

Refers to a mention of Masa in the Asahi Shimbun.

  4
masa141
n.d.[?]
Asahi Shimbun (Morning Sun) newspaper from Osaka, Japan.

In Japanese.  Refers to Masa [one photocopy].


copyright protected
thumbnail only
  5
masa142a
n.d.
Notepad entitled, "References, --- George Masa."  Includes names, partial addresses, and general notes.
Cover
  masa142b Mrs. L. L. Matthews
34 Birch St., AL 4-4554
Has photos made on Mt. Mitchell in 1916.  Can tell something about Masa's ways.

Blake Creasman
Central Avenue
Used to work with Masa.

Verne Rhoades

Tony Lord

Page 01
  masa142c Mrs. Blanche Creasman-Moore
3 Orchard Pl.
Has stories to tell about George Masa who used to live with her people.
Page 02
  masa142d George Masa
Masahara Iizuka / Iisuka
born Jan. 20, 1881
died June 21, 1933

Asheville Citizen
June 22, 23 & 24, 1933

Page 03

Folder

Item

Description Thumbnail
10 *  *  * Misc. items related to the making of the film by Paul Bonesteel, "The Mystery of George Masa" 2002. [3 items] *  *  *  *  *
  1
masa143a
13 March 2002.
"Thank You" card from Jami Daniels to "Mr. McDonald."

Expresses appreciation for McDonald's cooperation and support on Bonesteel film, The Mystery of George Masa..

Exterior
  masa143b [same] Interior
  2
masa144
6 September 2002.
Press Release issued by the Carolina Mountain Club.

"New Film Rescues Story of Japanese Photographer in WNC."  Announces the premiere of the Bonesteel film, The Mystery of George Masa.

  3
masa145
December 2002.
Letter from Paul Bonesteel to Helen Wykle.

Expresses appreciation for the cooperation and support of Ramsey Library-Special Collections [UNCA].  Offers to donate copies of his film for library use [See The mystery of George Masa [videorecording] / a Bonesteel Films production in Ramsey Library].

  4
masa146
December 2002.
Letter from Paul Bonesteel to supporters of the film, The Mystery of George Masa..

Bulletin containing general release information, including ordering instructions for videotapes and DVDs.

 

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