D. H. Ramsey Library Special Collections and University Archives

Voices of Asheville Project
OH-VOA

Table of Contents

Summary Information
Scope and Contents
Administrative Information
Related Collections
Collection Inventory
Juanita Aiken and Paula Roebke
Leslie Anderson
Luke Atkinson
Ewart M. Ball III
John Best
Jane Raoul Bingham
Walter Boland
Robert J. and Louise Branson
John Bridges
Stanley A. Briggs
Patricia Brinkley
Charles Brown
Robert Brunk
Charles Buchanan
John O. "Buck" and Janet Buchanan
Robert and Barbara Buchanan
Lewis and Porge Buck
Robert D. Bunn
Thelma Caldwell
Margaret Calloway
Ruth Camblos
Garrett Carter
Marguerite Carter
Ted and Elizabeth Carter
John and Anne Chiles
Ellen Clarke
James and Elspeth Clarke
Billy Cline
Annie Reel Cogburn
George Coggins
Margo Coggins
Hazel Collington and Donald Hill
Marie and Henry Colton
John Cort
Karen Cragnolin
Jane Craig
Phillip Crouch
Jeanne Cummings
Robert Daugherty
Hyman Dave
Roger Derrough, Jr.
Margaret Dowdle
William and Mary Duckworth
Edmonds Family
Leo Finkelstein
Beale and Peggy Fletcher
Jeff Fobes
Denise Foster and Susan Van Burgel
Mary Lloyd Frank
Margaret Fuller
John and Elizabeth Garland
Roy Gibbs
Doris Giezentanner
Laura Gordon
Ortez Devoe (Lacy) Griffin Jr
Robert Griffin
Lacy and Harriett Haith
Jim and Virginia Hamilton
Eone Harger
Betty Christine (Chris) Slagle Harrell
Lucy Mae Harrison
Lou Harshaw
Harvey Haynes
Fred B. Hearn
Chester D. Hensley
Allene Sugg Highsmith
James (Shorty) and Edna Hollifield
Carrie Lucille Holmes and Doris Brewer
Lawrence D. (Larry) Holt
Bonnell Roberts Honeycutt
James W. (Red) Hoyle Sr.
Jessie Huff
Wade Huff
William and Dorothy Hussey
Mary Hyde
Lucius (Craggy) and Esta (Liz) Ingle
Dorothy Jackson
John Johnson
(Pinkney) Greer Johnson
Minnie Jones and Mary Williams
Dorothy Joynes
Morris and Leah Karpen
Barbara Cassat Keleher
Michael Francis Keleher
Ray Kisiah
Grace Kouns
Betty Tenn Lawrence
Harmon M. Lee
Joe Lingerfelt Jr. and Charlie McAdams
Marjorie Lockwood
Anthony (Tony) Lord
Bascom Lamar Lunsford's Daughters [Jo Herron, Lynn Hadley, Nelle Greenawald, Merton Brown]
Cheryl Lunsford
Ann and Robert MacPherson
Nancy Marlowe
Dee Mason
Maggie Masters
Richard and Jane Matthews
Marjorie Maxwell and Elizabeth Jackson
Glenn May, Nancy and Frank Leppert, and Chris Perry
Eileen McCabe
Frances McDowell
Glenda I. McDowell
Roger McGuire
Gerald B. McMillan
Erline L. McQueen
Phillip M. Merrell
Kenneth M. Michalove
Sallie Ellington Middleton
William (Bill) Moore
Robert and Linda Morgan
Ralph D. Morris Jr.
Thomas Morrissey
Brigitte Oliphant
Edith Overby
Harley Elmer Ownbey
Richard and Anne Parham
James Parker
Mary Parker
Kenneth Partin and Nancy Seymour
Paul (Dusty) Pless, Jr. and Kathy Bowman
Lettie Polite
Margaret Poor
Margery Post
Mother Margaret Potts
Norma and Patrick Price
Rainbow Mountain School
Kostas and Emily Rantzos
Eleanor and Charles Rawls
Jesse Ray Sr.
Milton Ready
Helen Tarasov Reed
John Mackey Reynolds
Thomas and Lillian Reynolds
"The Rivers of the Carolinas"
Scott Rogers
James Roosseau
Carolyn Rosenthal
Florence Ryan and Nanine Iddings
Mary Sancrant
Hilda Burrell Sands
Michael Sargent
John Q. Schell
Patty Schleicher
Katharine Bynum Shepard
Robert E. Shepherd
Booker T. Sherrill
O. L. Sherrill
Phyllis Jones Sherrill
Louis D. Silveri
Oralene Simmons
Mary Elizabeth Robinson Sligh
Charles Sluder and Tammy Taylor Gaddy
Harold Sluder
Robert "Bob" Smith
Albert, Alan, Ray and Jay Sorrells
Wanda Stanard
O. E. (Oscar Edwin) Starnes, Jr.
Eleanor Waddell Stephens
Imogene (Cissie) Radeker Stevens
Marion Stivers
Bob Terrell
Mitzi Schaden Tessier
Col. Alfred J. Thomas and Sgt. Charles Fisher
O. T. Tomes and Tyrone Greenlee
Lynn Troutner and Kathleen Balogh
Nick and Anastacia (Anne) Tsiros
Herbert Turner
John P. VanAlstyne
Susan Walton
Jean and Robert Webb
Stefan Weir
Alice White
Shirley and Alfred J. Whitesides Jr.
William Williams
Sister Kathleen Winters
Mary Ellen Wolcott
Richard A. Wood, Jr.

Summary Information

Repository
UNC Asheville Special Collections and University Archives
Title
Voices of Asheville Project
ID
OH-VOA
Date [inclusive]
1989-1997
Extent
17.0 Linear feet  ; 17 boxes
Physical Description
Audio recordings of interviews on cassette tape, and sometimes, copy CDs. Any supplementary materials, such as transcripts, photographs and clippings, are described within each individual oral history. Some recordings have gaps and/or inaudible sections.
Location
Located in Special Collections row 3, sections 2 and 3
Language
English

Preferred Citation

[Title of Interview], Voices of Asheville Project, D. H. Ramsey Library Special Collections, University of North Carolina Asheville

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Scope and Contents

Comprising almost 180 histories, but a higher number of interviewees since some histories involve two or more people, the Voices of Asheville Project was created by, and is essentially the work of, Dorothy Joynes. Joynes moved to Asheville from Santa Barbara, where she had collected oral histories, and decided to "show the tapestry of the city over the last hundred years" through oral histories of people "from all walks of life, backgrounds, races and ages". Joynes initially concentrated on people born in the early 20th century, so the collection is particularly rich in stories about life in Asheville during the Depression, but histories also cover both World Wars, the racial divide and integration, the exodus of downtown stores, and the redevelopment of Asheville. The focus is Asheville and the people of Asheville, so although there are some mentions of national events and organizations, these tend to be in the minority.

There are very few full transcripts included, but there are abstracts of the interviews. These abstracts were likely written by Joynes, and are extensively cross referenced to other interviews, and sometimes include written asides and comments by Joynes. For these reasons, abstracts have been included even when there is a full transcript available. Interviews generally also include interview notes / tape index likely handwritten by Joynes and these often form the basis of the abstract.

Most interviews also include additional materials such as photographs of the interviewee and places referred to in the interview, programs and pamphlets for relevant organizations and/or events, and newspaper clippings related to the interview. In some instances, these additional materials are quite extensive.

A small number of the interviews were undertaken in the late 1980s as part of a history of the American Association of University Women. Dorothy Joynes subsequently prepared abstracts for these interviews, and incorporated them into the Voices of Asheville project, and they are included in this collection.

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Administrative Information

Publication Information

UNC Asheville Special Collections and University Archives

Ramsey Library, CPO # 1500
One University Heights
Asheville, North Carolina, 28804-8504
828.251.6645
speccoll@unca.edu

Rights

Some restrictions as noted for specific interviews. Any display, publication, or public use must credit the D.H. Ramsey Library, Special Collections, University of North Carolina at Asheville. Copyright retained by the creators of certain items in the collection, or their descendants, as stipulated by United States copyright law.

Creator

Dorothy Joynes ; Interviewees and other interviewers as noted

Processing Information

Originally processed by Southern Highlands Research Center, and Special Collections staff. New finding aid by Colin Reeve, October 2016

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Related Collections

Dorothy Joynes was a member of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Asheville, and had an involvement with the collection of oral histories for the church. Consequently, some interviews in this collection are with members of the UUCA, and the church may feature prominently in the interview, and there is a correlation with the church oral history collection.

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Collection Inventory

Juanita Aiken and Paula Roebke 

Interview Date and Interviewer

April 30, 1996 : Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; text

Scope and Contents

Juanita Aiken describes working for many years for Fains, a discount department store in downtown Asheville. She discusses the changes in store operations and doing business in Asheville over the years. She also describes her years growing up in the Presbyterian Home for Children in Black Mountain, NC. Paula Roebke, manager of Fains, adds her perspective.

Biography

After the death of her husband, Juanita Aiken's mother was unable to support her four children, so she sent her two younger girls to live at the Presbyterian Home for Children. Juanita Aiken lived there from second grade until graduation from high school and describes a strict but secure life in the orphanage. After working briefly for a CPA, Aiken came to Fains, a discount department store on Biltmore Ave in downtown Asheville. She worked there as a cashier until the store closed in 1996.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; transcript ; photographs of interviewees and Fains store ; interview notes ; newspaper clippings ; Presbyterian Home brochure

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Leslie Anderson 

Interview Date and Interviewer

September 30, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Anderson discusses Asheville downtown revitalization and numerous Downtown Development projects with which she has been involved. She analyzes the reasons for success of some of the projects and the failure of others. She describes the painstaking process of getting citizen input before programs can be implemented. She discusses her work as an advocate for children and young people with Planned Parenthood and Children First.

Biography

After moving to Asheville from Florida, Leslie Anderson became very active in many areas of Asheville cultural and economic life, especially downtown revitalization. She worked with the Pisgah Girl Scout Council, the Asheville-Buncombe Youth Council of the Recreation Department, and for the city of Asheville as head of the Downtown Development program that she helped to start in 1986. After to interview was recorded she worked with the Asheville YWCA to help guide the organization through a financial crisis and a major fundraising campaign. She served on the board of Planned Parenthood and as a member of Children First, helped found the Child Advocacy Institute.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Leslie Anderson and health care buildings ; newspaper clippings ; brochures

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Luke Atkinson 

Interview Date and Interviewer

April 14, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Atkinson discusses Asheville politics, including property taxes, budget growth, and the domination of Asheville politics by North Asheville. He discusses changes in race relations and describes business trends, such as the impact of interstates and malls, that he has observed during over 40 years as owner of a furniture store in West Asheville.

Biography

West Asheville businessman Luke Atkinson came to Asheville from Waynesboro, NC to open a successful furniture store. He served one term on Asheville City Council and participated in Better Business Bureau, Rotary Club and Calvary Baptist Church activities.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Luke Atkinson and Atkinson store ; brochures

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Ewart M. Ball III 

Interview Date and Interviewer

May 19, 1996 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Ball discusses the challenges and rewards of his work as a staff photographer for the Asheville Citizen-Times. He describes changes at the newspaper over the years in staffing, format and editorial policy. Despite some frustration with the way his pictures are cropped and used by the paper, he enjoys his work. He talks about his uncle's photographic supply store and about his father and grandfather whose photographs of Asheville from the 1920's through the 1960's are now housed in UNCA Special Collections as the Ewart M. Ball Photographic Collection.

Biography

Following in the footsteps of his well-known father and grandfather, Ball became a commercial photographer and a staff photographer for the Asheville daily newspaper. His first love was music, but he learned the art of photography by helping his father. When his father died unexpectedly, Ball was offered his position at the newspaper.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Ewart Ball, Ervin Ball, Ball camera store, and house ; newspaper clippings

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John Best 

Interview Date and Interviewer

March 19, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; text

Scope and Contents

Best discusses his experiences on the Asheville Police Force, as well as the changes that have occurred in the force over the years. He also describes the changes in Asheville over time, the moving of stores out of downtown and into the malls, and the relocation of houses and roads during city revitalization. He gives details about different veterans organizations, and discusses his work as a volunteer veterans' claims representative in Asheville.

Biography

After twelve years of service in the Army, Best joined the Asheville Police Department, serving 32 years until his retirement in 1978. After retiring he volunteered for the Veterans of Foreign Wars. At the time of the interview, he had a daughter working at the Court House, and two grandchildren - one a student at UNCA, and the other at Appalachian State University in Boone.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; photographs of John Best and Asheville fire department ; newspaper clippings ; business card

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Jane Raoul Bingham 

Interview Dates and Interviewer

September 14 1992, September 23 1992, and October 1 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Mrs. Bingham describes the arrival of her grandparents and parents in Asheville. She describes visiting at Fernihurst and Richmond Hill as a child. Her father was president of the Biltmore Forest Company; she describes the development of the town of Biltmore Forest from its beginning to the present, including many of the significant individuals involved. She discusses zoning, police and fire, Hendersonville Road right-of-way acquisition, the Biltmore Forest Country Club, the effects of the 1930s Depression, and changing architectural styles. The formation of the Haseltine School and of Asheville Country Day School are described in detail, progressing to the merger of the schools, the move to a substantial building on Merrimon Avenue, and other succeeding events. She describes her attendance at St. Genevieve's School and the decision to send her children to Asheville Country Day School. She discusses the recent merger of Country Day and St. Genevieve's. Mention is also made of Asheville School and Christ School. She has been very active in organizations concerned with Parkinson's disease, the local sign ordinances, Common Cause, and other organizations; she describes these activities and the individuals with whom she has worked.

Biography

When she was eight years old, Mrs. Bingham's family moved to one of the first houses constructed in Biltmore Forest, and her father became President of the Biltmore Forest Company. She was flower girl for Cornelia Vanderbilt's wedding. She attended St. Genevieve's for 2nd, 3rd and 4th grades. She was a member of the Junior League beginning in the late 1940s. During the late 1940s and early 1950s she also began working for the Asheville Community Theater, where for a time her duties included driving for Charleton Heston. She helped to start a Pony Club. She taught French at Country Day School, which started as a small private school to prepare children to go to northern prep schools, and her children were given scholarships. When her husband developed Parkinson's Disease, she became active in starting a support group in Asheville. Jane Bingham died on September 8, 2001

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Jane Bingham ; newspaper clippings

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Walter Boland 

Interview Date and Interviewer

April 10, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Boland discusses the development of downtown: Wall Street and Pack Square, and the problems that prevented these from successfully drawing people back into the city. He feels that location and developers have hindered the success of Pack Square, and thinks that the only chance for the square is to change direction and promise parking and quality goods. He discusses city planning and festivals such as Bele Chere and the Goombay Festival. He describes the formation of the Downtown Commission. He feels that Asheville's main attractions are the mountains and vistas, which are not being protected. He also expresses concerns about the state of the French Broad River. He discusses integration and race relations in Asheville. He feels that discrimination occurs in education, job opportunities, and in housing and city planning, all of which deny opportunities to blacks. He discusses plans to start grassroots organizations for blacks in the city

Biography

Walter Boland received his PhD. in Sociology in 1966 at the University of Michigan and came to UNC Asheville where the department was beginning and growing in 1970. He authored two books, and worked hard to develop a good Sociology Department. He became president of the Family Council and basketball coach for the Little League for four years. His involvement in "Crop Walk," a community organization to help third world people, led him into politics. He was encouraged to run for City Council. Many people helped and he ran second in the primary, however there was some resistance to professors serving on the council. After serving for a term, he spent full time on university activities but went back for six years. He also served on the YMI Cultural Center Board for years. Boland died on September 27, 2010.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Walter Boland ; newspaper clippings

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Robert J. and Louise Branson

Interview Date and Interviewer

January 11, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Robert discusses the Depression and his service in the Army during World War II. He and Louise describe how they met and were married. He discusses his experience working on the Asheville Police force, as well as issues such as unionization. Changes in Asheville over the years are described.

Biography

Louise went to Claxton School, David Millard Junior High and Lee Edwards High School. She worked at Bon Marché as a cashier for 18 years and then went on the floor to sell. Robert was born in 1925, and graduated from Lee Edwards High School in 1943. He joined the Army, and went to the South Pacific in one of the first divisions to land in Japan after the A-bomb. The whole division came home in 1945. Louise didn't meet him until 1948. They were engaged for two years before getting married on March 23, 1952. He joined the Asheville Police Force. He was on traffic for 20 years. In 1973 he was promoted to Lieutenant and in 1974 made Captain. In his job he was responsible for the record room personnel, the property room, crime prevention, animal control, parking tickets and communication.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of interviewees, their house, and Asheville jail ; clippings

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John Bridges 

Interview Date and Interviewer

November 6, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photograph ; text

Scope and Contents

Bridges describes the Pack Library and its various programs: the Alexandrian frieze, the multi-purpose room, programs for children, concerts, meetings and lectures. He discusses his experience working with the Juvenile Evaluation Center. He reviews the history of early theater in the city, and describes the art and music scene in Asheville.

Biography

Bridges worked as a librarian at the Pack Memorial Library for 29 years. He attended Asheville-Biltmore Junior College (working during that time as a page at Pack Library) and graduated from UNC Chapel Hill. He earned a Masters in Theater and went to New York City. In 1956 he came back to Asheville and joined the staff of the public library where he developed programs for children, obtained important films, gave programs on art and for years has given pre-concert programs called "Tea and Symphony" - which he started and still continues. He correlated his program "See a Film, Read a Book" (for K-2 students) with the public schools and traveled all over Buncombe County giving each school six programs in a school year. He died in Asheville on November 22, 2015.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photograph of John Bridges ; newspaper clippings and extracts

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Stanley A. Briggs 

Interview Date and Interviewer

May 15, 1996 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Briggs describes his experience in the furniture-making business. He discusses different types of lumber and their availability and how the price of lumber has changed over the years as a result of deforestation and policies of the US Forest Service. He discusses the EPA and the effect of its regulations on the furniture industry. He describes several of his experiences, including a job for Billy Graham's training center,The Cove. He discusses the growth of big businesses and corporations at the expense of small businesses.

Biography

Briggs was born in the Asheville area in 1927 and grew up in his father's furniture work shop. He made handcrafted furniture from solid wood. After college went to the Morgan Manufacturing Co, where he took over the business management and later the engineering and designing department. He worked there for 12 years before going into business for himself. Although he had no formal training in design, he worked for famous designers and was recommended to Frank Lloyd Wright.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Stanley Briggs and his workshop ; calendar ; newspaper clippings

Restrictions

Cannot be copied

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Patricia Brinkley 

Interview Date and Interviewer

December 13, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Brinkley discusses her experience working with Morris (Mac) McGough, as well as his life and work, and his influence on rural life in western North Carolina. She relates the history of the WNC Community Development Association, and its role in organizing programs for rural development and improvement of rural living standards. She discusses problems with agriculture in this area, the search for an alternative cash crop to tobacco, and the effect of policies of the US Forest Service on the sale and manufacture of timber. She describes the creation of and programs of the WNC Agricultural Center, the WNC Farmers' Market, and the NC Arboretum.

Biography

Brinkley, with a business background, was working in a psychiatric hospital. She wanted to make a change and was employed as secretary with the WNC Community Development Association, presenting programs to communities. After 9 years, her mentor Morris McGough retired, and she applied for his position with the Development Association, becoming the only woman in a male dominated field.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Brinkley, the Ag Center and Farmers Market ; clippings and pamphlets

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Charles Brown 

Interview Date and Interviewer

March 13, 1997 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Brown discusses stock car racing in the region, from the 1960's to the present. He describes the Winston Cup Race and races at the Amboy Road Speedway. He also discusses the Winston signs at the speedway and the cigarette endorsement, and the various divisions of NASCAR. He describes the retail furniture business as he has experienced it working with the family business, Factory Sales and Surplus.

Biography

Charles was born in Asheville in 1967, and graduated from T. C. Robertson High School. He attended Montreat-Anderson College, and was active in sports and spent two years with the Baltimore Orioles in Frederick, MD. He was released due to injury and took up stock car racing in 1987. He sold his car and now only drives for other people. At th time of the interview, he was temporarily living in Tennessee where his wife's family lived, but planned to move to Leicester.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Brown, Factory Sales and Surplus in Asheville, and Asheville speedway ; clippings ; Stock Car Racing magazine

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Robert Brunk 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 9, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Brunk discusses his experiences working for the City of Asheville as a neighborhood services organizer. He spent most of his time helping to reform housing developments for the poor. He describes changes achieved in Hillcrest, as well as racial issues involved in these changes. He discusses his goals as neighborhood services organizer, which centered around helping poor people find means to help themselves. He describes teaching in the Sociology Department of UNCA. He also discusses his experience living and working on a 100-acre farm in Barnardsville, NC and his interest in pre-industrial agrarian culture.

Biography

Brunk graduated from the University of Michigan in the mid-60's where he was involved in social change activities. In 1966 he was hired in Madison County and later in Asheville as a neighborhood services organizer. His job was to help tenants organize themselves to solve their problems. He wrote the history of race relations in Asheville for his Model City proposal. He organized youth activities and Head Start programs. His goal was to help poor people find ways to help themselves. He was a professor of Anthropology and Sociology at UNCA for 5 years, from 1968-1972. He and his wife moved to Barnardsville, NC, where they farmed. His interest in furniture making led to a career as an auctioneer.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Brunk ; clippings ; auction catalogs

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Charles Buchanan 

Interview Date and Interviewer

June 23, 1993 ; Sylvia Robin

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photograph ; text

Scope and Contents

Buchanan discusses his childhood in Asheville during the Depression. He describes his early education, walking to school, living without electricity, and hunting to provide food for the family. He discusses his experience in the Army, as well as various other jobs he has held. He talks about his children and grandchildren.

Biography

Buchanan was born in Barnardsville, NC, and spent his life there and in Asheville. He quit school in the sixth grade, earning his GED later when he was drafted into the Army. After his service in the army, he had various jobs, working for the city, at a construction company, a bakery, and an electrical company. He has five children and two grandchildren.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photograph of Charles Buchanan ; clippings about Angela Buchanan and Queen Carson

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John O. "Buck" and Janet Buchanan 

Interview Date and Interviewer

July 28, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

John describes his experience owning and running his own restaurant, which opened in 1946 and was sold in 1976. He discusses the changes that occurred in the restaurant over time, particularly the effect that the traffic cut made on his Tunnel Road business. Janet talks about her experiences in the restaurant, where she worked as a hostess, waitress and cook. John talks about his service on the Asheville City Council, Chamber of Commerce, and Highway Commission, where he was active in promoting changes for Asheville. He also discusses Pack Place and problems with attempts to revitalize downtown Asheville.

Biography

John's father ran a 5 and 10 store in Tryon, NC, and asked him to open a store in Swannanoa for his sister which he did in 1933. He went to work at Beacon Manufacturing Company [blankets] and played basketball for them, winning four state championships. Having experience working in the restaurant business, he opened his own restaurant, called "Buck's" in 1946. He sold the restaurant, and then took it back 2-3 years later, reopening in 1975. He served on the Asheville City Council, the Chamber of Commerce, and the Highway Commission. He was on the board of the Asheville Country Club and in charge of the food. He died in 1995.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; recording notes ; photographs of the Buchanan's and their house ; clippings ; restaurant menu

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Robert and Barbara Buchanan 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 12, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Robert and Barbara discuss their experiences working in their full-service station formerly owned by Barbara's parents. They describe the services offered by the station, and the changes that have occurred over the years. Barbara describes her education, elementary school through college, and her job keeping the books for the station. They discuss the changes in Asheville over time, particularly the impact that the I-240 traffic cut had on businesses in the area, and the impact of Asheville Mall on downtown businesses. They also discuss the impact the computer has had on their business.

Biography

Barbara's parents owned and ran a full service station; her mother pumped gas and had men working for her. Barbara went to school at St. Genevieve's, Newton and Plonk School, and later graduated from Sacred Heart College and Blanton's Junior College where she learned bookkeeping, a skill which she used at the service station. Bob was born in Asheville, went to David Millard and Lee Edwards and, in order to get technical training, went to Burlington, NC. He started work at the Three Mountaineers running wood lathes and worked for Fishburn Equipment Company. He was later hired as a mechanic in Barbara's parents' service station, and they subsequently owned and ran the station together.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes; photographs of the Buchanan's and the service station ; clippings

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Lewis and Porge Buck 

Interview Date and Interviewer

March 2, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

The Bucks describe coming from Maine to live in "Historic Montford", and their struggles to operate an art gallery in their home there.

Biography

Porge and Lewis Buck were both artists and were both active in community affairs. Lewis Buck died in 2012, aged 87.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of the Bucks and Montford ; Montford newsletter ; clippings

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Robert D. Bunn 

Interview Dates and Interviewer

November 9, 1992 and November 10, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Bunn discusses his experience growing up in Asheville in the early 1900's, giving details about what the area was like during this time. He describes his childhood friendship with Thomas Wolfe. He talks about the rapid growth of the city before the Depression, and discusses the effect of prohibition on the economic state of the area. He describes life during the Depression, and talks about the various jobs that he took in order to make money. He talks about going into business for himself, buying and selling antiques. He discusses moving to various locations and selling oil paintings from England. He talks about changes in Asheville over time, and recalls experiences he had working with motion pictures that were made in this area.

Biography

Robert D. Bunn was born November 14, 1899 and died October 29, 1994. His father was an English brick maker, and after the Civil War the Government ordered him to leave Patterson, NJ and build a brick wall around the soldiers' graves in Salisbury, NC. Robert lived two blocks behind Thomas Wolfe, and they played together as children. He attended the city school on Orange Street. He had various jobs in Asheville during the Depression, but, in order to avoid the draft, he joined his brother in Yancey County to work his two mica mines. After the war he brought surplus and obsolete clothing which he peddled through Eastern Tennessee. He was licensed by the U.S. Mint in Pennsylvania and sold gold to Finkelstein. He eventually opened his own shop, where he sold antiques that he bought from all over the world, and did silver plating.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; recording notes ; photographs of Bunn and his home ; "The Life and Ancestry of Robert Dewy Bunn" ; newspapers ; clippings

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Thelma Caldwell 

Interview Date and Interviewer

November 18, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Caldwell discusses YWCA programs through the years, and other related organizations with which she has been involved. These include programs for integration and peace, housing, pregnant teenagers, literacy, the aging, and many others. She talks about Goombay celebrations. She makes reference to the fact that churches are the last places to desegregate.

Biography

Thelma Caldwell was born in Rockingham, NC, Oct 21, 1912. She moved to Portland, Maine after marrying Ernest Caldwell, a CCC Camp director. Later she became YWCA branch Executive Director in Dayton, Ohio. In the early 1960's she came to Asheville to head the Phyllis Wheatley branch of the Asheville YWCA and became Executive Director of the integrated Asheville YWCA.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; transcript ; interview notes ; photographs of Thelma Caldwell and YWCA building ; copies of YWCA materials ; clippings

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Margaret Calloway 

Interview Date and Interviewer

April 27, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Calloway discusses her experience working with Minico Cleaners, describing the changes that she saw in the business over the years. She discusses the effect of synthetic fibers, household laundry machines and inflation on business. She also discusses her experience helping with her husband to build Clayton Street Baptist Church, describing its development over time.

Biography

Margaret Calloway moved to this area from Yancey County to help her sister raise her children, during which time she missed a year of high school and decided not to return. She got a job with Swannanoa Laundry, where she met her husband when she was 15. She later went to work with Minico Cleaners, staying there until it closed. She married her husband at age 20. She and her husband helped to build Clayton Street Baptist Church, where they attend services.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; photographs of Margaret Calloway and Minco Cleaners ; clipping

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Ruth Camblos 

Interview Dates and Interviewer

September 3, 1992 and October 15, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Mrs. Camblos details past and present extensive fund-raising for the Smith-McDowell house, including a grant awarded by the North Carolina legislature. Stabilization of the house, technical museum requirements, and restoration are described. She describes efforts that were made to discover original turn-of-the-century plans for the garden and grounds of the property. She describes her connections with St. Genevieve's school and the merger of the school with the former Asheville Country Day School to form Carolina Day School. She edited the text for a book about St. Genevieve's written by Mother Margaret Potts. She describes her involvement with the medical auxiliary and the Junior League. She also discusses tourism and the necessity of preserving western North Carolina's natural beauty.

Biography

In the early 1970's Mrs. Camblos, wife of physician Joshua Camblos, published a book, Shopping Around the Mountains, with Virginia Winger. It sold very well, with several subsequent editions. Through Frances McDowell, she became involved with the Smith-McDowell House, during the earliest part of its restoration and development. In 1982 the French Broad River Garden Club gave her an award for her work on the Smith-McDowell grounds. She assisted in editing a book about St. Genevieve's written by Mother Margaret Potts. She is also involved with the medical auxiliary and the Junior League.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Ruth Chamblos ; brochure ; clippings ; planting list ; copy of "St. Genevieve's Remembered"

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Garrett Carter 

Interview Date and Interviewer

September 17, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Carter discusses his service in the Army during the Vietnam War. He describes training, his duties, and experiences of combat with the Vietcong during the Tet Offensive. He describes coming home from the war and trying to find a job. He discusses his job as superintendent of Green Hills Cemetery, describing his duties, other cemeteries in the area, and changes in burial practices that have occurred over time. He talks about his son, who joined ROTC in high school, and then later joined the Marines.

Biography

Carter was born in the Mission Hospital, and lived in North Asheville as a child. He went to Claxton School, David Millard and Lee Edwards, graduating before integration. He went to college at Mars Hill, studied Spanish in Madrid, and went to UNCA one summer. He was deferred from the draft until he graduated in 1967 with a major in history and a minor in political science. Two weeks after graduation he was drafted. He completed his basic training in Fort Gordon, GA, and was sent to Vietnam five months before the Tet Offensive took place (February 28, 1968). In November, 1969, when he was released from service, jobs were scarce and he needed four more college credits to teach. After an accounting job with Young Life [a Christian youth ministry headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colorado] at Windy Gap Camp, he accepted a position as superintendent of Green Hills Cemetery.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; photographs of Garret Carter, his house, Asheville cemeteries and buildings ; clippings ; Young Life brochures

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Marguerite Carter 

Interview Date and Interviewer

November 1, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Carter discusses her memories of everyday life in Asheville when she was a child, during the early 1900's. She describes her first experiences with automobiles, telephones, movies and radios. She describes her education, and her experience teaching physical education. She talks about changes that have occurred in education since she was a child, and changes that have occurred in the area over time. She talks about how she met and married her husband, and describes activities they enjoy together.

Biography

Carter was born in Asheville in 1903, growing up during the age of the horse and buggy. She went to the Murray Hill School for first grade, where her aunt was a teacher. Later she went to school on Asheland Avenue and Montford Ave, finally graduating from David Millard in 1921. She went on to college at Randolph Macon, graduating and returning to Asheville to teach fourth grade for two years at Grace School. She then went to Columbia University to study physical education, and after one year was asked to teach physical education to girls at David Millard and Hall Fletcher. For many years she taught Physical Education at St. Genevieve's. She also taught folk dancing and had festivals, attended by parents. At one time she returned to college to study tap dancing, folk dancing and gymnastics. She died on March 10, 2001, aged 97.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Marguerite Carter and buildings that featured in her life ; clippings

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Ted and Elizabeth Carter 

Interview Date and Interviewer

November 20, 1996 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Ted Carter discusses his writing experience, and talks about his book of Asheville anecdotes, "Checking the Drag". He describes places that were popular in Asheville. He and Elizabeth talk about Asheville during the boom time when it was considered the Miami Beach of the mountains, and discuss how the city went downhill after the City Bank and Trust failed. Ted discusses his experience in WWII, and describes life in this area during prohibition. He traces the history of the development of UNCA from a two-year free junior college on the top floor of the high school. They discuss changes in the area over time.

Biography

Ted Carter was born in Cussin' Knob in Madison County, and spent his professional life coaching basketball in Western North Carolina. He started in Walnut and spent 15 years at Asheville High School, where he also taught history classes, until he retired. He authored two books about Asheville history (enclosed ) and, at th time of the interview, had four more in process. One on sports, one called "Men to Match the Mountains", and "Asheville: Checking the Drag and "Sweet Talking". Elizabeth met him when she was in Mars Hill College and he was teaching in the Buncombe County schools. They were married before the World War II and lived in Hendersonville and Gastonia before returning to Asheville. Ted was in the army during WWII, going to Fort Bragg for basic training and Fort Sill for artillery training. His wife went with him until he went to North Africa. He was in the Battle of the Bulge and stayed with the army until the bomb was dropped on Japan. Ted Carter died on July 23, 2006, aged 91.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Ted and Elizabeth Carter and their home ; "Ted Carter's Vest Pocket History of Asheville..." ; clippings

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John and Anne Chiles 

Interview Date and Interviewer

August 28, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

John Chiles discusses the development of the Kenilworth neighborhood, where his family bought property when he was a child. He describes his mother, who was an artist and the first woman to become mayor [of Kenilworth] in North Carolina. He talks about area landmarks, such as the Kenilworth Inn and the Manor. He discusses the effect of the Depression on property values and development. He and Anne discuss how they met, were married, and eventually moved to Butler Mountain to raise their children. John discusses his various activities, and his involvement with St. Genevieve's School, Boy Scouts, and the Board of Merchants Association.

Biography

John Chiles was born in the Biltmore Hospital, and his parents bought property in the area that is now Kenilworth. His mother was an artist and his father was a developer from Lenoir where he dealt in furniture. Over time, Kenilworth established itself as an independent suburb, with its own fire station, police, and sewer system. John and his brother were in the Navy. When he returned he was going to take a lot and build but found that the assets of the Kenilworth Reality Co. were sold on the Court House steps for $1200. The Chiles holdings were wiped out. His mother tried to salvage what she could and was made mayor. This did not pay a salary. She tried to make a living off Kenilworth Realty Company. Anne met John while they were building scenery for Asheville Community Theatre. They dated several years and lived on Cortland Ave where their first child was born. Later they moved to Butler Mountain and lived there 18 years. John worked with a committee with the headmaster and the sisters at St. Genevieve's to build a new building to replace the convent and grammar school.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of John & Anne Chiles, and Kenilworth ; Kenilworth newsletter and map ; clippings

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Ellen Clarke 

Interview Date and Interviewer

March 27, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Clarke discusses her career working to improve conditions and opportunities for inmates in jail, describing her job as co-director of a program sponsored by ABCCM to bring adult education to inmates. She discusses issues that make prison sentencing ineffective and inappropriate, and talks about alternatives. She describes a community-based, correctional approach to criminal behavior. She discusses the difference in problems faced by rural and urban areas. She talks about the crisis of prison overcrowding. She describes growing up in Alabama during the Civil Rights Movement, and how this has influenced her life. She wants people to know about her program, which is a citizen-based, non-profit organization, managed by a volunteer board of directors from the community, and how it functions as an alternative to the prison system.

Biography

Clarke was born in Alabama and grew up during the Civil Rights Movement. She graduated from St. Andrews College in NC, worked in Washington, DC for two years and got her master's degree from Union Theological Seminary. She first went to jails in Alabama, visiting regularly and getting to know the inmate needs, meeting the county commissioners, mental health staff and social service workers. After this 18-month project was concluded, she went to the University of California, taking courses in criminal justice and working with citizens' groups looking at problems in their jails. She moved to Asheville with her husband in 1975, and became co-director of a new program sponsored by ABCCM to bring adult education opportunities to inmates in jail. During this time she got to know the people working in the field, the director of Adult Education for ABCCM and jail minister. They worked with volunteers who established a library, providing clothes to be used for hearings and following up with families on the outside. During the last two years of her work at ABCCM she was part of a statewide commission to assess the effectiveness of imprisonment and to make recommendations to the Governor.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Ellen Clarke and Buncombe County jails ; clippings ; business card ; brochures

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James and Elspeth Clarke 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 22, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

James and Elspeth Clarke discuss the effects of the Depression on the area, especially the effect on agriculture. Elspeth describes her father's efforts to start a farmers' cooperative to create a better market for selling produce, and both she and James discuss their work with this cooperative. James talks about his terms of office on the Buncombe County Board of Education, and the NC State Legislature. They both discuss the McClure Foundation, which is designed to give funds to technical schools and students with ability who need financial assistance. They describe the changes that have occurred in the foundation over time, and discuss changes that they foresee in the future. They discuss the education and occupations of their eight children.

Biography

James Clarke came to Asheville in his teens during the Depression, and saw the effects on the economy of the area. Elspeth's parents came here on their honeymoon, and her mother was advised to move here after the Civil War because the growing season was better for farming. Her father worked on the farm and preached, and in 1920 began the Farmers' Federation. He had problems selling his produce, and got the idea of starting a cooperative in Fairview, NC. In 1921 he built warehouses and developed markets for farmers, who would sell to the warehouse and buy from the co-op. Both James and Elspeth have been active in this endeavor. For 8-10 years James was associate editor of the Asheville Citizen- Times. He was in the Pacific for two years, and was serving in Washington, DC, when he and Elspeth were married. He wanted to continue with the cooperative, so they returned. He also served eight years on the Buncombe County Board of Education, and was elected chairman. He served two terms in the NC Legislature, ran for the State Senate and then Congress. They had eight children. James Clarke died in 1999, and Elspeth died in 2001.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes; photographs of James and Elspeth Clarke, Sherrill's Inn, property and markers ; clippings ; booklets on Sherrill's Inn and Biltmore Country Market

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Billy Cline 

Interview Date and Interviewer

July 13, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Cline discusses his early ambition to start a chain of grocery stores, which changed at the age of 24, when he received the calling to be a minister. He describes his years as pastor of Merrimon Avenue Baptist Church in Asheville, NC. He describes the outreach ministries in which the church is involved, and talks about the attempts of members to bring Christ to others in the area. He discusses the Baptist denomination, different Baptist churches, and Baptist Associations. He discusses the increase in black population near the church, and his efforts to reach out to his new neighbors. He talks about his stance on the controversial issues of abortion and homosexuality. Also included are recordings of Cline's sermons.

Biography

Billy Cline was born in Valdese, NC, a small city founded by the makers of Sunbeam Bread. His father had a grocery store and Billy planned to start a chain of supermarkets. He served in the 2nd airborne group during WWII, and later returned to Valdese. When he was 18 he married a Jehovah's Witness, and at 24 he received Christ into his life. He sold his business and enrolled in Gardner-Webb College, later transferring to Lenoir-Rhyne to become a pastor. He received his Master of Ministry degree from Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Wake Forest, NC. During his 30 years as pastor of Merrimon Avenue Baptist Church, the church grew dramatically and began many community outreach ministries. He died on May 16, 2012, aged 84.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Cline, Baptist churches in Asheville, medical clinic and FemCare buildings ; clippings

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Annie Reel Cogburn 

Interview Date and Interviewer

March 22, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Annie Cogburn describes growing up in a rural community outside of Marion, NC, where her father owned a farm. She describes memories of her childhood, her education, and church services. She talks about her chores as a child, her dislike of field work, and her desire to get out of the country and into the city. She decided to become a nurse, and talks about her training and work at Mission Hospital until her retirement at the age of 80. She discusses the Tuberculosis epidemic, and its effect on nurses and health care facilities. She describes how she met and married her husband, her son's service in WWII as well as his job as a fireman, and her activities since retirement.

Biography

Annie Cogburn was born in McDowell County 12 miles south of Marion, NC, and raised on a farm with a family of 14. She attended a one-room schoolhouse without electricity, helped her parents work the farm, and helped her mother raise her younger siblings. She decided to become a nurse, and went to work at the Morganton Insane Asylum, a large house where mental patients and alcoholics were treated. She was trained at Mission Hospital in Asheville, NC, working three shifts during the three years it took to get her certificate. She met her husband at the foot of Pisgah, and he later bought some land and had a house built before they were married. She continued her work at the hospital, working twenty-hour shifts and sleeping for four. Her son served in WWII, and became a fireman upon returning from overseas. She retired when she was 80 to spend her time taking care of her home and garden.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Annie Cogburn and various hospital buildings in Asheville ; profile of Cogburn in "We Remember" ; clippings

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George Coggins 

Interview Dates and Interviewer

October 30 and 31, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

George Coggins discusses growing up in the community of Bee Tree, and moving to Asheville during the Depression. He describes the city before, during and after the real estate boom. He talks about the Grove Arcade, and about his role in developing a tourist industry in the area. He discusses his activities in the development of the Asheville Civic Auditorium, Westgate, Pack Place, A-B Tech, and the Asheville Art Museum. He also worked with W.P.A. arts groups and local sports organizations. He describes his role in various other organizations, including the American Kennel Club, the Asheville Community Theater (ACT), the NC Symphony Orchestra, the Civitan Club, and the Smoke Abatement Commission. He discusses changes that he has seen in the city over time, from city development to integration, drugs and environmental problems.

Biography

George Coggins was born in the Bee Tree area east of Asheville. His father was a star pitcher at Wake Forest College, who later started the Asheville baseball team, and his uncle, Samuel Coggins, who was a sheriff. He claimed to be a descendant of John Burton, who first sold property on the site that became Asheville. He graduated from Swannanoa High School and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he majored in journalism, banking and commerce. Circumstances on a construction job led to his working in a clothing store. He describes his activities in an early tourism promotion organization, which later merged with the Asheville Chamber of Commerce. He was involved with Senator Robert Reynolds in the late 1930s in obtaining funds for the Asheville City Auditorium. He describes his construction of the Westgate Shopping Center, after selling his interests in vermiculite mining and hair tonic. He has constructed a house on Sunset Mountain in Asheville adjacent to the old city reservoir, and entertains there frequently with his wife, Margo [also interviewed in this oral history collection]. Coggins was active in the development of Pack Place. He has also been active in the American Kennel Club, of which he later became president, Asheville Community Theater (ACT), the N.C. Symphony Orchestra, the Civitan Club, and was chairman of the Smoke Abatement Commission.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of George Coggins and Westgate Mall ; clippings ; copy of family tree

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Margo Coggins 

Interview Date and Interviewer

November 19, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Margo Coggins discusses changes in Asheville in the years since she arrived, and refers to her husband's business interests, including hair tonic. She describes how she and her husband decided to build their current house near an abandoned quarry on Sunset Mountain. They have incorporated an old city reservoir into their garden. Their swimming pool was damaged during blasting for the Interstate 240 open cut through Beaucatcher Mountain. She discusses other effects of this project, such as noise. She discusses her views on Asheville and its future, and her political views. Coggins discusses her interest in music, and her involvement with musical groups and guilds. She describes her experience with her own radio show, her involvement in the League of Women Voters, and her term of office as the second president of a support group for the Art Museum, the Muses.

Biography

Margo Coggins was born in Bethel, Ohio, near Cincinnati, and particularly enjoyed music as a child. She moved to Asheville when she was young and continued her musical interests, including membership in music groups. She had a radio program for several years where she conducted interviews. She is married to George Coggins [see his interview also as part of this oral history collection]. She was the second president of the Asheville Art Museum support group, the Muses, which later became known as the Museum Auxiliary. She was active with the Asheville Symphony Guild, the League of Women Voters, and All Souls Episcopal Church for many years.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes; photographs of Margo Coggins and former premises of Asheville Art Museum ; clippings ; Asheville Symphony leaflet

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Hazel Collington and Donald Hill 

Interview Date

April 28, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Siblings talk about their lives. Hazel Collington tells family stories, and Donald Hill describes his travels in the Navy.

Biography

Hazel Collington and Donald Hill worked throughout their lives at Christ School in Arden, NC., she as a housekeeper, and he as a groundskeeper and school bus river. Donald also served in the Navy where he had many adventures, including three years spent in Japan and behind the firing line in Korea.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Hazel Collington, Donald Hill, Christ School and Blake House ; Christ School News 1991/92 ; clippings

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Marie and Henry Colton 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 2, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Marie Colton describes visiting her grandparents in Asheville as a child, giving details of conditions of travel and mourning customs of the time. She describes the Grove Arcade during the Rhododendron Festival. Marie and her husband Henry discuss their decision to move to Asheville, and describe changes that they have seen in the area over time. They both describe their interest in and experience with local politics, and Marie discusses her term of service in the NC legislature. She talks about specific bills, fundraising issues, and techniques for organizing and coordinating action. They discuss the education and occupations of their four children.

Biography

Marie Colton's grandparents moved to Asheville from Charlotte, NC, and she and her brother, the only grandchildren, came to Asheville to visit. Henry grew up in Nashville, TN. He heard about the land boom and thought Asheville the best-known small city. In 1943 he and Marie drove up to see her grandparents on Cumberland Ave. Ten years later, he was an independent insurance agent, and wanted to live in a larger city than Morganton, so he and Marie decided to move to Asheville. He was active in church and civic groups, and was elected to Asheville City Council. Marie was active in PTA work and had been on the statewide PTA Board. The Secretary of State told the people at a meeting in Raleigh how important the State legislature was and she, having finished high school in Chapel Hill and graduated from the University, knew many people in politics and was very interested. She worked on Henry's campaigns and when he decided not to run, she ran for the state legislature and won. Henry was involved with race riots in 1969, when race relations in the city were very tense. Henry died in 2011, aged 90.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Henry & Marie Colton ; election materials ; clippings

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John Cort 

Interview Date and Interviewer

October 13, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Cort discusses his work as an architect for the firm of Lindsey Gudger, which he joined in 1967. He describes different projects he has worked on, as well as different issues concerning building and zoning. He discusses his experience serving on the Planning and Zoning Commission as a county representative. He talks about controversies and ordinances that have determined the way Asheville has developed. He describes how the topographies of Buncombe County and Asheville have created very distinct neighborhoods and attitudes, and discusses the positive effects of this diversity. He discusses changes that he has seen in the area over time.

Biography

John Cort moved to Asheville when he was four years old, where his father was successful in building several motels and homes. His experience working with his father convinced him to become an architect. He graduated from Lee Edwards High School and NC State University. His first job after joining the firm of Lindsey Gudger was building the Biltmore Gate House. Becoming very involved with the city, he joined the Planning and Zoning Commission as a county representative, and was chairman of a Subdivision Review Board. He is married to Lee Steel Kincade and has two sons.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; Photographs of Cort, his office and the Biltmore gift shop ; clippings

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Karen Cragnolin 

Recording Date

April 7, 1995

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

In a public lecture, Cragnolin discusses her accomplishments as Executive Director of RiverLink, and outlines the problems and plans for the future of Asheville's rivers. She describes attempts not only to protect the rivers, but also to make them attractive to tourists, and to gather public and corporate support for these efforts. She discusses the implications of the disastrous fire at the Cotton Mill.

Biographical Note

Karen Cragnolin founded RiverLink in 1986, and she worked to create a program that will protect Asheville's rivers and watersheds from pollution, and to gather public interest and support for the river as a tourist attraction that should be kept beautiful. On Sept 21, 1994 the first part of the project was completed. It was started in West Asheville at the confluence of the French Broad and Swannanoa Rivers, and included a picnic shelter, observation deck, and a fishing pier, which were constructed along with a parking lot and asphalt trail for walking and jogging. She stepped down as executive director of RiverLink in 2016.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; recording notes ; photographs of Karen Cragnolin and images related her talk ; brochures and clippings related to the French Broad River

Restrictions

Cannot be copied

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Jane Craig 

Interview Date and Interviewer

December 2, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Jane Craig discusses how she met and married her husband, and talks about his medical training and experience. She describes Highland Hospital and treatments for mentally ill patients used prior to the 1980's. She discusses recent changes in treatments, as well as changes that have occurred because of an increase in drug use in society. She describes Asheville in the 1970's, and talks about the destruction of neighborhoods brought about by urban renewal. She discusses her experience working as the President of AAUW, her involvement with developing kindergarten and after-school care programs for city schools, and her current involvement with the Deerfield Episcopal Retirement Home. She discusses the change in values, a woman's role in society, changes in Asheville and anticipation for the future.

Biography

Craig met her husband when she was a student at Goucher College, in Baltimore, Maryland, and he was in his first year of medical school. They married when he became an assistant resident. He took a year of residency in neurology and in 1938 went to Duke University. Jane spent most of her time with her children and working in the community. When she came to Asheville she became involved with the Country Day School on Victoria Road. She became President of AAUW, and was instrumental in starting the first kindergarten in Asheville city schools. She was also involved in starting an after-school care program at Randolph School, and. served on the board of Deerfield Episcopal Retirement home. She died in 2008 aged 94.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Jane Craig and Deerfield Retirement Home ; clippings

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Phillip Crouch 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 21, 1997 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Phillip Crouch discusses his experience owning and working in the Ideal Pharmacy, which was previously owned by his father. He describes changes that have occurred in different medications, drug interactions, restrictions and insurance coverage over the years. He discusses the threats posed to pharmacies by HMO's and drug manufacturers. He also discusses today's social climate, citing a decline in religion and an increase in greed as problems. He talks about changes that have occurred in West Asheville over the years, and discusses his involvement with the Asheville Housing Authority and Habitat for Humanity.

Biography

Crouch was born in 1938, and went to college to be an accountant and then decided to follow his father and went to the pharmaceutical school in the University of North Carolina. He took over ownership of Ideal Pharmacy, following his father who died in 1974. He served as President of the N.C. Pharmaceutical Association, was involved with the Housing Department, and worked with the local chapter of Habitat for Humanity. His son has followed him in pharmacy.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Phillip Crouch and the Ideal Drug Store ; clippings

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Jeanne Cummings 

Interview Date and Interviewer

March 8, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Jeanne Cummings discusses her life in Asheville, describing the city as it was when she and her dermatologist husband arrived 30 years ago, and changes that have occurred over the years. She talks about her involvement in the community, describing organizations and associations of which she has been an active member. She discusses her experience as President of the Junior League, and talks about the development of the Nature Center. She describes several of her most memorable volunteer activities. She also discusses the integration of the Asheville School and the Asheville Country Day School.

Biography

Cummings and her husband moved to Asheville from New Orleans in the 1970's. During her years in Asheville she has been very involved in the community. In the early 1970's she worked with school education programs using puppets and the nationwide "Green Circle" program to combat drugs and encourage integration. As president of the Junior League in 1972 and 1973 she helped launch the program which became the Nature Center. She served on the Red Cross Board, the United Way, and through the Memorial Mission Hospital Board, joined the Bio-ethics Committee. She served as Chairman of the Medical Care Review Committee which reports to the Hospital Board, and joined the Biltmore Forest Board of Adjustment which handles appeals for variances on zoning.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Jeanne Crouch, Junior League 'Next to New", and Nature Center ; Junior League and Nature Center brochures ; clippings

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Robert Daugherty 

Interview Date and Interviewer

August 15, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Daugherty discusses his experience with Asheville High School's Jr. ROTC program, and his plans to go to college and join the Marine Corps. He describes drills, uniforms, rules and procedures of the ROTC program. He talks about females being given entrance into male drill teams, and discusses the controversy at the Citadel in Charleston, SC. He gives his views on politics, leadership, the draft, drugs and crime.

Biography

Robert (Bob) Daugherty was born on January 14, 1977 in Hamburg, Germany, and was battalion commander of the Jr. ROTC at Asheville High School. His father was professor of physics at UNCA and his mother an administrative director in the UNCA Computer Center.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Daugherty ; clippings

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Hyman Dave 

Interview Date and Interviewer

May 19, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Hyman Dave discusses his experience living and working in Asheville since 1934, when he moved here to work with his brother as a civil engineer. He outlines changes that he has seen in the city over time, discussing the growth of traffic and industry, as well as environmental and economic problems. He talks about popular places in the city, and the changes that he has seen in them through the years.

Biography

Dave came to Asheville from Durham for summer in 1929 and then moved here in 1934 as a civil engineer. He worked with his brother who started Dave Steel Company during the Depression. They had practically no equipment but worked hard and grew, putting up buildings and prefabricating steel for industries all over the country. He served as chairman of the board for the Asheville Downtown City Club, and as an officer in his Temple. He died in 2011, aged 100.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Hyman Dave, Dave Steel, ABC store, Crowfields, and BB&T building ; brochures ; clippings

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Roger Derrough, Jr. 

Interview Date and Interviewer

December 17, 1996 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Roger Derrough describes his experience in 1974 with an outdoor leadership program that led him to become a vegetarian, and discusses the development of his health food store Earth Fare. He describes the growth of interest in health food diets, macrobiotics, alternative medicine, yoga, and new age spirituality. The growth of Earth Fare over the years is discussed.

Biography

Derrough moved to Asheville from Burnsville, NC when he was 10 years old, and graduated from Asheville High. He attended Western Carolina University, but had no strong career direction and dropped out to work as a carpenter's assistant. In 1974 he took an outdoor leadership course where he led a small group over a strenuous track with nothing but a compass, basic gear, and whatever food they could find on the land. After this experience he became a vegetarian, and upon his return to Asheville decided to open a health food store, since there were no others in the area at the time. Earth Fare became an extremely successful business, and with the development of other health food stores, the market in this area expanded greatly.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Roger Derrough, Earth Fare and other places associated with Derrough ; brochures and clippings

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Margaret Dowdle 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 24, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Margaret Dowdle discusses her experience working as a teacher in the Eliada Home, which was at the time a facility for children that had come from broken homes. She discusses the changes that have occurred in the home over the years, as the school has closed and it has become a family facility with a daycare for working mothers. She talks about the problems of integration. She outlines changes that she has seen in Asheville through the years.

Biography

Dowdle was born in Sylva, NC, married, and moved to Franklin, where her children were born. She was 42 when her husband died in 1959. She went to the University of Greensboro to get teaching certification and moved to Asheville to teach in 1961. She taught for two years in the Valley Springs School, and then taught for twelve years at Eliada Home, a facility for children that had come from broken homes.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Margaret Dowdle ; clippings

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William and Mary Duckworth 

Interview Date and Interviewer

September 11, 1996 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Bill Duckworth discusses his experiences working in the real estate and appraisal business, and describes his involvement with the March of Dimes, the Department of Transportation, the Veterans Administration and the Federal Housing Authority. He outlines the contributions that Weldon Weir made to Asheville. He discusses particular projects in which he was involved, and lists changes that have occurred in the city over the years. He talks about the Downtown City Club, and describes other important city buildings. He discusses his involvement with the City Council, and serving on the Board of Adjustments under the Planning and Zoning Board. Mary discusses her involvement with the Preservation Society, which she was instrumental in starting, and served as President.

Biography

Mary Duckworth moved to Asheville in the early 1940's. Bill was born in the city on Pearson Drive, went to Grace School for the full 11 years, attended Mars Hill College, where he met Mary, and then Wake Forest to finish his B.A. while she went to Duke. They were married in 1942 after graduation and before he entered the service. Bill considered several careers, but chose the real estate business. After 8 years of study, he became the first M. A. I. (Member of Appraisal Institute) in Western North Carolina, and was on a panel of appraisers for the Asheville Savings bank, the Veterans Administration and the Federal Housing authority for recommending loans. He did a great deal of work for the Department of Transportation when I-26 and I-40 were being constructed. His volunteer work included fundraising for the March of Dimes. Mary helped to found the Preservation Society, of which she later became president. Mary Duckworth died in 2009, age 88.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of William & Mary Duckworth, office & staff, and buildings ; clippings

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Edmonds Family 

Interview Date and Interviewer

October 23, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Job opportunities, economic conditions, locations of industry, changes in wages and unionization are all discussed. Gary describes the various jobs he has held, working for Blue Bell, Xerox, and finally training to drive a tractor trailer. He also discusses the changes that he has seen in this area over time, with the development of the city. He talks about the impact of his job on his family. Wilma discusses her job making computer switches, Gareth talks about his experience working at Office Depot, and Phelan describes his interest in paleontology.

Biography

Gary Edmonds lived in Asheville since he was a child, and after his service in the military he drove tractor trailers for 18 years across the country. At the time of the interview he was currently training to be a backup driver, whilst Wilma worked in Mars Hill for the Micro Switch division of Honeywell, Gareth had graduated from North Buncombe High School and was working at Office Depot, and Phelan was in the ninth grade of North Buncombe High.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of the Edmonds family and home, Office Depot, scenes of downtown Marshall, NC ; clippings and brochures ; microswitch

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Leo Finkelstein 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 5, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Leo Finkelstein talks about his experience working in the pawn shop that he inherited from his father. He shares some interesting anecdotes about his customers. He discusses the Depression, and the effects that it had on businesses and people. Mr. Finkelstein talks about his partner, June Bassett, who kept the business running quite efficiently while he served in the military. Mr. Bassett became sole owner upon Mr. Finkelstein's retirement. Finkelstein talks about his involvement with the Lions Club, in which he has been active since 1930. He played piano in the Asheville Lion's Club band called the Sanctimonious Seven. He was instrumental in the organization of the Buncombe County Shrine Club. He also outlines his involvement with the Jewish Aid Society, the Jewish Community Center, and both of Asheville's Synagogues. He was the president of one synagogue and vice president of the other. He discusses changes that he has seen in the area over time, and describes his current activities and interests. Much of this interview consists of discussions about the operation of his business, and the people with whom he came in daily contact.

Biography

Leo Finkelstein's father came to Asheville in 1903; Leo was born in 1905 on Ashland Avenue. He attended an area grammar school and was in the 1922 class of what is now Asheville High School. As a schoolboy, he sold newspapers and worked in his father's pawn shop for fifty cents a week. He eventually took over the business, and was successful during the depression when other businesses failed. He was head of the Jewish Aid Society. He served in the South Pacific during WWII. He was active in the Lions Club, and played the piano in the Lions Club band which called itself the Sanctimonious Seven or the Unholy Six. He belonged to both Asheville Synagogues,was president of one and vice president of the other, and was the first treasurer for the Jewish Community Center on Charlotte Street. He started writing when he retired, and remained active in the Asheville Lions Club. He died on March 22, 1999.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Leo Finklestein, his home and store, the Jewish Community Center and temples ; clippings.

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Beale and Peggy Fletcher 

Interview Date and Interviewer

November 4, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

The first section of the interview is an extended discussion by Beale Fletcher of the early history of the Arden and Fletcher areas, including the Fletcher Inn, Arden House (hotel), the Blake family, the Westfeldt family, and the Fletcher family. Beale describes how he became interested in dancing, and how he met Peggy, who became his dance partner and wife. They discuss their experiences traveling together with their children, and talk about the dance studio that they opened. They discuss the career of their daughter, Maria, who was Miss America in 1962. She performed extensively and won talent contests as a child. Her ambition was to become a "Rockette" at Radio City Music Hall in New York which she succeeded in doing. She became Miss America during her first year there. Details of the operation of the Miss America Pageant are described in the interview. The Fletchers' other children, Walter, Margaret and Bonnie, are also discussed. The Fletchers describe several different aspects of dancing, and talk about various projects that they have been involved in through the years.

Biography

Beale Fletcher was born in the Arden/Fletcher area south of Asheville where his father owned a small dairy. He attended the Fletcher school, and later Christ School (in Arden). He graduated from Vanderbilt University. Peggy (Gatley) Fletcher is from Montreal. At the time she and Beale met, she was dancing six months each year in the United States. They met professionally and became a dance team. Beale showed early talent for performing and was allowed to go to New York with his parents' support; he also partially supported himself in school through dancing. After beginning their family the Fletchers continued to travel, but when Maria, the oldest, became school age they settled in Asheville. They opened their own studio, the Fletcher School of Dance, and also taught in schools for a period of time. Their appearances during the opening period of a local television station (WLOS) helped their business initially. In addition to their school, the Fletchers started the Land of the Sky Civic Ballet in 1948 which was open to anyone through audition. Their son Walter and his wife Linda became studio managers. Walter died in a private plane accident in 1988, and his widow Linda was in the process of buying the studio at the time of the interview.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Beale and Peggy Fletcher, and negatives of Maria Beale Fletcher and Patsy Baker ; clippings ; menu from Blake House Inn ; leaflet from Fletcher School of Dance ; Miss America postcard

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Jeff Fobes 

Interview Date and Interviewer

November 11, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Jeff Fobes discusses his experience working to found The Green Line, a liberal newspaper that discusses controversial issues, and is designed to effect change and strengthen the community. He describes the amount of work that goes into publishing a free newspaper, and discusses some of the paper's current financial problems. He talks about other alternative papers, and the organizations that unite them. He discusses problems that he sees, not only in the paper, but in the community, and says that our community needs to have a public forum to share ideas.

Biography

Because of his father's international career with the United Nations, Jeff was raised in India, France, the mid-west, and Washington, DC, and he moved to Asheville from St. Louis in 1983. In 1989 a group formed in WNC calling themselves the Greens - from the West German Green Movement, which focused on environmental awareness, grass-roots democracy and the feminist movement, and when the group decided that it needed a newsletter, Jeff got the job. The newsletter later became The Green Line, a liberal paper designed to promote change and strengthen the community through the discussion of controversial issues.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Fobes ; copies of Green Line And other free newspapers ; clippings

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Denise Foster and Susan Van Burgel 

Interview Date and Interviewer

June 6, 1996 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Denise Foster discusses her experience starting her own house painting and wood restoration business, "Wood Care," which she owns and operates with the help of Susan Van Burgel. They describe what it is like to be female working within an area traditionally dominated by men, and discuss issues of harassment. They talk about the problems they have had finding reliable help, and discuss their dissatisfaction with the work ethic in this area. They describe several of their most memorable projects, and discuss various techniques and products that they use.

Biography

Denise Foster was born in Fort Lauderdale in 1966. She went to the Seventh Day Adventist Fletcher Academy and took 2 years of nursing in Orlando, Florida and then the main campus in Chattanooga, TN, where she had one year of pre-med. She currently works part-time as a nurse at Thom's Rehab, to earn money for her painting and wood restoration business, "Wood Care." Susan was born in Chico, California and raised in the Bay Area. She has had 15 years of painting experience, and was referred to Denise while working on a bank in Black Mountain. The two currently work together in the Asheville area.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Foster and Van Burgel ; clippings

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Mary Lloyd Frank 

Interview Date and Interviewer

October 26, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Frank describes how she became interested in politics, and outlines her community involvement. She discusses her experience serving as a member of the AAUW, the League of Women Voters, the board of the public library, and the Asheville City Council. She discusses various aspects of local politics. She outlines the problems inherent in planning, zoning, and road construction, and discusses how these problems have affected Asheville's development

Biography

Mary Lloyd Frank was born in 1926, attended public schools, and graduated from Chapel Hill with a BS in chemistry. She met her husband, also a chemist, and worked for a year at Enka following marriage, quitting in order to have a family. She joined the AAUW, and was been an active member for 30 years. She was also involved with the League of Women Voters. She joined the Library Board and became chairman, serving for 10 years during the building of the new library. She ran for city council in 1981 and won. She was involved in the creation of the Montford Historic District and the Liberty Historic District. She was on the Environmental Affairs Board for the county, and was involved in getting the county to buy property for another land fill.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Mary LLoyd Frank, her house and Citizen's Hardware store ; clippings

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Margaret Fuller 

Interview Date and Interviewer

September 7, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Margaret Fuller describes her education and talks of a sense of community in her childhood neighborhood. Other subjects discussed were segregation and the bond between black and white women due to their subservience to men. She talks of the redevelopment of Eagle Street and Valley Street and the history of the annual Goombay Festival.

Biography

Fuller grew up on Jason Street off Hill Street. She attended Hill Street School and Stephens-Lee. After 12 years living in Chicago, she returned to Asheville and worked for the city. In 1991 she became administrative coordinator for the YMI Cultural Center.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Margaret Fuller and YMI ; YMI information pack ; clippings

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John and Elizabeth Garland 

Interview Date and Interviewer

January 21, 1995

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Elizabeth Garland discusses her experience growing up in this area, describing life during the Depression, her education, and her jobs in various clothing stores. John Garland also describes his experience growing up in Asheville during the Depression, and discusses the constraints that poverty put on his family. He discusses his experience as a soldier during WWII, and talks about the technical training that he received upon his return from the war as a result of the G. I. Bill. He describes various jobs that he has held through the years. He discusses changes that he has seen in the area over time.

Biography

Elizabeth lived in the Asheville area as a child, and her father worked on the railroad during the Depression. She attended Grace School, and later worked at Sears and Bon Marché while her children were growing up. On Haywood St. she opened her own ladies' dress store, which closed around the time of the interview. John was born on Beaverdam Road, and his father built a home on Spook's Branch. As a child he also went to Grace School, and worked in a grocery to help his family. He volunteered for the Air Force in 1941, serving 2 years and 8 months. With only six weeks of training, he was transferred to the infantry during the Battle of the Bulge the Battle. Under the G. I. Bill he went to the Asheville Technical School at night while working for W. A. Ward Electrical Contractors. He stayed there 5 1/2 years but there wasn't enough work so he joined the union to be able to work at Hayes & Lunsford Electric Co. Later he went to work for his father. His wife, Eleanor Garland, died of cancer in 1980. He later met and married Elizabeth.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of John and Elizabeth Garland and place associated with them ; clippings

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Roy Gibbs 

Interview Date and Interviewer

May 10, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Roy Gibbs describes his experiences working in the theatre business from the age of 14 until he retired in 1977. He discusses the Plaza Theatre, and the various changes that he saw over the years. He talks about concessions, housekeeping problems, the development of talking pictures, segregated theaters for blacks and whites and the effects of integration. He outlines other changes that he has seen in theaters over the years. He discusses the various theaters in Asheville, and talks about changes that he has seen in the city.

Biography

Roy Gibbs was born in Asheville on December 7, 1914, and has lived here his whole life. During the Depression, he went to work for the Princess Theatre at age 14, working his way up from an usher to manager. Eventually he became city manager of all theaters, with an office in the Plaza. He stayed there for 47 years until he retired in 1977. He served two years in the Navy, from 1944-1946. Roy Gibbs died on June 1, 1995, aged 80.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Roy Gibbs and the Merrimon Twin theatre ; clippings

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Doris Giezentanner 

Interview Date and Interview

March 25, 1996 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Doris Giezentanner describes her experience growing up in the rural community of Woodfin, NC, during the Depression. She discusses her involvement with the incorporation of Woodfin, her service as Alderman, her involvement with the Inter-Agency Narcotics Squad, and her terms as a Buncombe County Commissioner. She has been very active in the community, and she describes several of the issues that she has worked on over the years. She outlines changes that have occurred in Woodfin through time and effort, and provides a list of problems that she felt needed to be addressed in the future.

Biography

Doris Giezentanner was born in 1926, into a family of eight children in Woodfin. She trained as an executive secretary at Blanton's, and worked part time for Tench Coxe. When Woodfin was trying to become incorporated, Doris was asked by 4 men to submit her name for election to run for Alderman. She won, served four years and was re-elected. In 1972 she was asked to work as secretary to the Inter-Agency Narcotic Squad. In 1976 she ran for County Commissioner, was elected and stayed on for 16 years. She was chosen to be vice chairman of the Land-of-Sky Council board, on which she served for 25 years. For her work in saving community school buildings that had been abandoned with county school consolidation, she received the Woman of the Year Award. In her years of civic service, she has been involved in issues of planning and development, environmental protection and education.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Giezentanner, and scenes of Woodfin ; newsletters ; clippings

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Laura Gordon 

Interview Date and Interviewer

December 15, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Laura Gordon discusses her involvement with various civic organizations, her work as a union organizer, and describes her concern for issues of freedom, justice and progress for the poor. She outlines her contributions to several organizations, and describes the work that she has done to provide alternative prison sentencing, freedom of choice for women, freedom of speech and religion, and better labor conditions, wages and pensions for workers. She discusses her involvement with the Unitarian Universalist Church, and how this involvement has helped her civic activities. She outlines several problems that she sees in the community, such as racism and intolerance.

Biography

Laura Gordon, her husband and two children moved to Asheville in 1983 from Maplewood, New Jersey. Throughout her life she has been involved in many civic organizations, such as ACLU, SDS, the Social Concerns Committee, AFSCME and ABCCM. She has been active in labor organizations, the French Broad River cleanup, Peace Day marches and Crop Walks, and has worked with Western North Carolinians for Criminal Justice to develop alternative prison sentencing. She has also been an active member in the Unitarian Universalist Church, which has supported her activities in the community. In her years of civic service she has worked to promote freedom of choice for women, freedom of speech and religion, alternative prison sentencing, and better wages, labor conditions and pensions for the poor.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photograph of Lauar Gordon and the Unitarian church ; church brochures ; clippings

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Ortez Devoe (Lacy) Griffin Jr 

Interview Date and Interviewer

July 25, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Griffin talks about his lifetime in aviation. He also discusses Asheville's aviation history and the relationship between the airport and the city. Griffin also speaks at length on the stores and shops of Asheville during his childhood and how they dealt with the Depression.

Biography

"Lacy" Griffin was born in Biltmore Hospital in 1923. He attended Biltmore School and delivered papers in Biltmore Forest as a child. After that, he attended Biltmore College and became one of the youngest people to receive their aviation instructor's certificate. He went on to teach naval cadets in Athens, GA, and French cadets in Orangeburg, SC. He spent three years flying in New York before returning to Asheville. He bought the Asheville Flying Service, the same company he worked for while he was growing up. He and his wife sold the company in 1987, but he maintained an interest in flying. Griffin died on October 8, 2003, aged 80.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Griffin and Asheville Jet Center ; clippings ; aviation leaflets

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Robert Griffin 

Interview Date and Interviewer

May 10, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Robert Griffin describes how he came to Asheville and fell in love with it, and how his work in an architectural firm led him to become involved with efforts to stop the cut through Beaucatcher Mountain. He discusses his involvement with the Preservation Society, and his efforts to make Biltmore Village and Montford historic districts. He outlines several projects that he has focused on in his career, and gives information about specific buildings that are historically valuable to this area. He describes the problems inherent in planning and zoning, which lead to the destruction of historic property, and lists changes that he has seen in the area over time.

Biography

Griffin became a registered architect practicing in Asheville since 1981, although he had been a resident since 1975, working on residential, commercial, and preservation projects. Robert served as president of Fireside Antiques and Interiors. His preservation efforts in Asheville earned him several local and one state award. He featured numerous times in Southern Living magazine and was honored by his inclusion in The Southern Home, a special Southern Living section which featured notable architects from the south. Griffin served on Asheville's Historic Resources Commission for six years and personally spearheaded The Biltmore Village Historic District, the Biltmore Village Historic District Design Guidelines, and was the consultant who prepared The Biltmore Village Preservation Plan. He served as Vice President of the Board of Advisors of the North Carolina Preservation Foundation and as a board member of the Preservation Society of Asheville and Buncombe County, and was a founding member and co-chairman of the Biltmore Village Historic Museum.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Griffin and his Fireside Antiques Store, Sky Club, public works facility, Biltmore Village buildings, The Hop ; Biltmore Village Development Plan ; Biltmore Village design guidelines ; clippings

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Lacy and Harriett Haith 

Interview Date and Interviewer

March 23, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Lacy Haith talks about teaching values along with carpentry and other vocational skills at Stephens-Lee High School. He recalls the history of the YMI Cultural Center and his fund-raising efforts to build a chapel at Craggy Prison. He served as chairman of the YMCA board. Harriett is Lacy’s second wife. She talks about being brought up in Raleigh and the culture shock when she arrived in Asheville. She describes teaching at Stephens-Lee High School, and after integration, at Asheville High, and how, early in her teaching career, she was required to visit the homes of students. She served on the school board, with one term as its Chair, and she discusses integration of the city schools.

Biography

Born July 20, 1909 in Elon College, NC, Lacy Haith earned a degree from the University of Michigan. He taught industrial arts at Stevens-Lee High School. He has been married twice and has three children. He retired from teaching in 1972 after 35 years. Born Nov. 2, 1931, in Raleigh, NC, Harriett Haith taught high school for many years and served on the Asheville City School Board, including one term as Chair of the Board.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Lacy & Harriet Haith, Haith Drive, Haith Educational Center, Stephens-Lee Rec. Center, and St. James AME church ; clippings

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Jim and Virginia Hamilton 

Interview Date and Interviewer

September 7, 1996 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Content

The Hamiltons discuss their involvement with the Asheville Community Theatre, where they both volunteered for years. James later became the director, after 17 years of acting. He also discusses his experience working for the Country Day School, as teacher of history, drama, debate, speech and poetry, and tennis coach. Both James and Virginia discuss their interest in the creative arts, and describe the changes they have seen in the ACT over the years.

Biography

Both the Hamiltons were students at the Plonk School for Creative Arts. They came to Asheville in 1949, when James became involved with the Asheville Community Theatre, and Virginia became the head dietitian at Mission Hospital. Virginia had studied at Penn State, Harpers in Detroit, and had served a year in the army. James played many roles in community theatre, volunteering as an actor for 17 years before becoming director. He was hired at the Country Day School where he remained 9 years teaching eighth grade homeroom, upper school boys and girls athletics, three history courses, drama, debating, speech and poetry, and he started a tennis team. Virginia acted in a number of shows, did choreography for many musicals and kept notes for Jim. She worked in the box office, with costumes, as stage manager, with make-up and while there was a costume mistress, she helped with changes. She worked in all capacities as a volunteer. Virginia Hamilton died in 2010, and Jim died in 2013.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Jim & Virginia Hamilton, Asheville Community Theatre, the Racquet Club, and Aston Park ; resumes ; ACT program ; clippings

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Eone Harger 

Interview Date and Interviewer

November 3, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photograph ; text

Scope and Contents

Eone Harger describes her work with a number of organizations including the AAUW and the League of Women Voters. In New Jersey, through the League of Women Voters, she became a member of one of the boards charged with re-drafting the New Jersey state constitution. Other governmental positions included chairman of the New Jersey gambling commission, and then the state Board of Control, responsible for investigating prisons, welfare, and mental institutions. She became involved with gerontology after observing the treatment of the elderly on welfare. She was appointed to be the director of a newly-created Division on Aging, which she headed for twelve years. She was involved with the development of Medicare. She discusses her work as a consultant to the United States Senate Human Services Committee. Before moving to Asheville in 1986, she learned that she had macular degeneration of the eye. After moving here she became involved with other volunteers in developing the Western North Carolina Visual Rehabilitation Center. It has now developed an established program, with paid staff members. Other services for the visually impaired are discussed. She is a member of the Asheville Symphony Guild. She describes her earlier involvement with the Unitarian Church, leaving it for a period of years, and becoming actively involved again after moving to Asheville. She discusses her observations of current church activities and programs.

Biography

Eone Harger grew up in a small South Carolina town, and described her childhood as difficult, due to resentment by other children of her intellectual abilities, including escaping from a kidnapping attempt during her college years. She taught school near Chicago, and later taught remedial reading to teenage boys. She married James Harger, who was employed by Lockheed, and lived in California and New Jersey. They had three children. Over the years she studied at the University of California at Berkeley, the University of Colorado, and Brandeis. Her work as consultant to the United States Senate Human Services Committee took her to Europe, the U.S.S.R., and Japan. She was the founding director of the New Jersey Division of Aging, and served on the National Board of YWCA She and her husband moved to Asheville in 1986 after reading related material in the New York Times. She cofounded the Western NC Visual Rehabilitation Center, became involved with the Center for Creative Retirement at UNC Asheville, and audited courses in the general curriculum. Mr. Harger died shortly after this interview, on December 7, 1992. She subsequently remarried, and died in Washington DC in 2006, aged 95.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photograph of Eone Harger ; information from WNC Visual Rehabilitation Center

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Betty Christine (Chris) Slagle Harrell 

Interview Date and Interviewer

June 9, 1993 ; Sylvia Robin

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photograph ; text

Scope and Contents

Chris Harrell discusses her experience growing up as a native of Asheville, describes her childhood memories, education, and her career as part of the National Climatic Center. She discusses her involvement as a foster parent and grandparent. She remembers segregation, and discusses the effects of integration on the city. She discusses her values, beliefs, and changes she has seen through the years.

Biography

Born in 1925, Asheville native Chris Harrell went to Randolph School and Grace High School. She worked for the US Government in the National Climatic Center for almost 42 years before she retired in 1986, and had involvement in the Foster Grandparent Program, a federal program administered through the NC office.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Chris Harrell ; photocopies of pages about Grove Arcade

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Lucy Mae Harrison 

Interview Dates and Interviewer

March 12 1994 and March 15 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Lucy Mae Harrison talks about life during the Depression. She recalls her teaching career at Hill Street School, Ashland Jr. High School, Stephens-Lee High School, and Morgan State College. Harrison talks about the church's influence on all aspects of life in the black community. She talks about the loss of black teachers after integration. Harrison describes her life-long involvement with the YWCA., how she attended programs and camps as a girl and helped form the YWCA Booster Club in 1976.

Biography

Harrison was born in Asheville. Her father was very influential in her life, and her work ethic developed from him, beginning with the ironing of barber bibs from his barber shop. Her parents attended separate churches, so she alternated between the two. She was a public school teacher for many years.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Lucy Harrison, her home, Asheville skyline and churches ; program for "Jabberwock 1991" ; clippings

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Lou Harshaw 

Interview Date and Interviewer

November 7, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photograph ; text

Scope and Contents

Lou Harshaw discusses her experience working for the radio station WSKY, where she wrote stories and commercials,and put on a show for women about women. She describes her experience working as the Publicity Director for the Chamber of Commerce, during which time she worked for the betterment and promotion of Western North Carolina. She discusses several initiatives that she was involved in, and talks about plans to increase the per capita income of the area by increasing industry and tourism. She describes her involvement with the filming of the movie The Swan, which she arranged to be filmed at the Biltmore Estate. She remembers Weldon Weir, and discusses several other important local political figures. She talks about her activities as a teacher at both UNCA and Mars Hill College.

Biography

Harshaw grew up in this area, attending Asheville schools and Biltmore College. She worked on the radio station WSKY, writing stories and commercials, and putting on a show called, "For Women Only," in which she interviewed women in different occupations. For eight years she worked as Publicity Director at the Chamber of Commerce, helping to pioneer the policy of promoting the entire WNC area. After her husband's death she decided to go into real estate, and worked with Town and Country for eight years. She later taught courses at UNCA and Mars Hill, and published her own travel series.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Lou Harshaw ; "Notes on the development of the social neighborhoods of Asheville" by Lou Harshaw ; clippings

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Harvey Haynes 

Interview Date and Interviewer

December 14, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photograph ; text

Scope and Contents

Harvey Haynes discusses his involvement with the founding of A-B Tech, where he became Dean of Instruction and later President. He describes his experience starting another community college in Greenville, SC. He outlines the development of A-B Tech, discussing changes in its curriculum and its relation to four-year universities. He describes his concerns over problems that he sees in the community, and talks about changes that he has seen over the years.

Biography

After graduating from college and serving in the military, Harvey taught for five years with General Electric. Because of the growing need for trained workers, a technical school began to be developed. He was asked to open the first technical education center in Greenville, SC, which became the third largest community college in the world. He returned to Asheville in 1963, and became Dean of Instruction at Asheville-Buncombe Tech. He later became president of the college. After he retired from A-B Tech he worked at Western North Carolina University.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photograph of Harvey Haynes ; A-B Tech information letter ; clippings

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Fred B. Hearn 

Interview Date and Interviewer

November 4, 1996 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Fred Hearn describes his father's bicycle shop, the different kinds of bikes they sold and how bicycles have changed over the years. He talks about his love of dancing, and describes his professional dancing career working with Ted Shawn, an all-male professional dance company. He discusses several important productions in which he was involved, and describes how he met and married his wife, Lucille. He talks about returning to Asheville to help with his father's store, and outlines changes that occurred in the area during his absence and since his return.

Biography

Hearn grew up in Asheville, was involved in the Glee Club at Asheville High, and worked in his father's bicycle shop. He went to Black Mountain College and the Cecil Business School. He loved to dance, and became involved with the Rhododendron Pageants, working out the choreography and training the dancers. He joined Ted Shawn, an all-men's dance company in Florida, where he met and married his wife, Lucille. He had two children, who were raised in New York. He moved back to Asheville when his father became ill, to help him run the bicycle shop.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Fred Hearn, his bicycle store, and his son Steve ; brochure ; clipping ; audio cassette tape of interview with Dorothy Joynes' grandson, Charles Hessler, in which he talks about his cycle

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Chester D. Hensley 

Interview Date and Interviewer

November 2, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Chester Hensley discusses his experience working for the Fire Department, and outlines changes that have occurred in the department over the years. He describes training procedures, uniforms, different types of emergencies, and various types of equipment. He discusses changes in city politics, organization of the fire department, as well as changes in retirement plans and unionization.

Biography

Hensley attended a boarding school in Yancey County, and then lived in West Asheville. In 1926, he joined the Fire Department on Pack Square at age 21. He worked his way up to training officer, and then to captain of the Merrimon Avenue Station, which is no longer in use. He retired in 1971, and became a painter.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Chester Hensley, firehouse, and postcard of fire engine ; clippings

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Allene Sugg Highsmith 

Interview Date and Interviewer

January 26, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Allene Highsmith discusses her involvement with the development of UNCA. She describes some of the central problems and issues that arose while trying to achieve university status, and discusses several factors that influenced the growth and development of the school. She describes her husband's goals for the university, and how he worked to achieve them. She also discusses her other involvements in the community, describing her interest in helping the poor, and her activities with Head Start and the YWCA. She talks about certain social and historical circumstances that shaped UNCA over the years, from integration to the Vietnam War. She discusses her children, and the people that have influenced their development.

Biography

Allene Highsmith was one of Asheville's most influential women, working alongside her husband for the development of UNCA as an accredited, 4-year university. She was been involved in many aspects of the community, from working to create day care centers for the poor and being active in Head Start and the YWCA, to serving on the Board of Education. In her years of service to the community, she was been an integral part of the growth and development of UNCA, with an active interest in progress, education, and in breaking the cycle of poverty. Allene Highsmith died on May 25, 2009, at the age of 81.

Additional Materials

Transcript ; interview notes ; photograph of Chancellor's residence, Merrimon Ave campus, and "Donkey" award ; copy of "Blue Banner", "UNCA Today", and "Ramsey Resources" ; clippings

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James (Shorty) and Edna Hollifield 

Interview Date and Interviewer

January 25, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Edna and James Hollifield discuss their experiences growing up in Asheville during the Depression, describing the harsh conditions of poverty. James lists various jobs that he undertook in his youth in order to help his family, and describes some of the jobs given to the poor by the WPA. Edna talks about her family and education, and describes how she and James met and were married. James talks about various jobs and projects he has been involved in, from selling produce and crafts in flea markets to working at the Enka plant. Edna discusses her experience working in various school cafeterias.

Biography

Both James and Edna grew up in the Asheville area during the Depression, facing the harsh conditions of poverty. James worked on a farm to help earn money, later getting a job with the WPA digging ditches and building roads, helping grade and slope the land on Lexington Street that was to be used for an Open Air Market. He and Edna met and were married in 1938, and their first son was born in 1939. When her children were small, she went to work in the Weaverville Elementary Cafeteria. James has held various jobs over the years, from working with his father and at the plant in Enka to selling crafts and glassware at flea markets and through the newspaper.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of James & Edna Hollifield, their home, State Street baptist church, and site of Lexington Ave. farmer's market ; clippings

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Carrie Lucille Holmes and Doris Brewer 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 28, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Doris Brewer talks about attending Asheville-Biltmore College and a two year college in Concord, S. C. She describes her 27-year career with the Asheville Library System, and recalls the community of "Stumptown." Brewer's aunt, Lucille Holmes, discusses life in Asheville in the 1920's and her faith in the Christian Science Church.

Biography

Lucille Holmes was born in Greenville, SC, but came to Asheville when she was seven month old. She grew up playing the piano and being very involved in the church. After marriage she moved to Massachusetts and spent her adult life there. She had a thriving sewing business. Doris Brewer, the child of Lucille's sister, was born in Asheville, and attended the Allen Home School. She worked in the Asheville-Buncombe County library system for many years, before she retired to care for her aunt.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes; photographs of Lucille Holmes and Doris Brewer, their home, and the Allen Center ; booklet about the Asheville Consistory and Amelia Assembly ; program for the 2nd Annual Beautillion ; clippings

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Lawrence D. (Larry) Holt 

Interview Date and Interviewer

January 27, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Larry Holt discusses his religious background, and the factors that led him to become a member of Asheville's Unitarian Universalist Church. He also discusses his experience as a planner for redevelopment, and describes several projects that he has been involved with over the years. He outlines the development of the Asheville UU church and describes changes that he has seen over the years. He discusses factors that influence the redevelopment of cities, and talks about specific areas that have been a problem in Asheville's redevelopment. He discusses changes that have occurred in the city over the years, listing several specific initiatives and projects that have influenced these changes.

Biography

Holt, the son of a Baptist minister, was deeply involved in religion throughout his youth. He was introduced to the Unitarian Universalist Church by his wife, whose family were second-generation Unitarians. He was a city planner by education and was employed by the Department of Housing Urban Development (HUD), a [federal] program created from other departments in 1967. In 1972, he was recruited to come to Asheville from Greenville, SC, to work on redevelopment housing. He worked with the East Riverside Redevelopment Project, a railroad community, replacing some of the worst housing in the city. Along with his involvement with city development, he has also been an active member of the Unitarian Universalist Church.

Additional Materials

Partial abstract ; partial transcript ; interview notes ; photographs of Larry Holt ; "Development Community" newspaper ; Housing Authority report, 1974 ; "Keeping the Promise" ; clippings

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Bonnell Roberts Honeycutt 

Interview Date and Interviewer

August 12, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Bonnell Honeycutt discusses her family history, particularly in relation to William Brittain, an early ancestor who once dined with George Washington. Other anecdotes concerning her parents' childhood are provided. She contrasts rural and urban life during her youth. She describes the Dula Springs Hotel and her visits with children of the hotel guests. She describes her household responsibilities, boarding school, selling produce in town, and the Depression. She was an organist for her church for sixty years, and she discusses what this and other aspects of her church involvement have meant to her.

Biography

Mrs. Honeycutt was born in 1905 in Dula Springs, near Weaverville, NC. She attended a local one-room school, then the Home Industrial School in Asheville, and graduated from the affiliated Asheville Normal School. She describes her sister's education, and refers to the establishment of a local school in the Dula Springs area by Julia and Frances Goodrich. She was instructed in the piano when she was young, and was given a pump organ by her father, which developed into a lasting interest. She attended business school and later worked at Wachovia Bank, where she met her husband. She was widowed and married again after twelve years. Her second husband was a policeman and was once held hostage by bank robbers.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Bonnell Honeycutt her son, and her house, Brittains Cove church, and gravestones of William Brittain and slaves ; booklets from Brittains Cove Presbyterian church

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James W. (Red) Hoyle Sr. 

Interview Date and Interviewer

November 19, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

"Red" Hoyle describes Asheville as it was during his childhood, and as it progressed over the years, with many details concerning the downtown area. He discusses several of his long-term involvements in detail. The evolution of the Chamber of Commerce is described, and its relationship to the Better Business Bureau and Asheville Merchants' Association. He discusses his tenure on the City Council, including issues and projects such as annexations, the Asheville airport, finances, the French Broad River, water quality, and the Asheville Civic Center. He describes the growth of his business and the acquisition of its current site on Market Street, formerly a car dealership, with drive-in parking. In the Carolina Senior Citizen article which accompanies the oral history, he describes the use of this store in the film, Thunder Road. Other aspects of the business, including the involvement of his family and employees, are discussed.

Biography

Nicknamed "Little Red," James Hoyle kept the name "Red" throughout his life. He began his career as a salesman at age 9, selling newspapers and chewing gum. He later worked for a dry cleaners and an engineering firm [in a clipping which accompanies this oral history, he describes Walt Disney's employment with the same firm at that time]. He entered the military in 1941. After the war he worked for Talman's Office Supplies and also drove a fire truck for the city. He started his own business, the Asheville Typewriter Company, in 1945. He was particularly active with the Merchants' Association for many years. He held a number of prominent positions in the Lions Club on a state and national level, and was a member of the Asheville City Council from 1970-1976. Hoyle died in 2015, aged 99.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Hoyles Office Supplies ; Hoyles Office Supplies brochure and samples ; clippings

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Jessie Huff 

Interview Date and Interviewer

May 1, 1989 ; Mary Hyde

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Jessie Huff outlines her family history in Mars Hill, NC, especially the relationship of her family to Mars Hill College. She describes her education and her work as a teacher, and talks about her work with the AAUW and other AAUW members that she has known over the years.

Interview Note

This interview is one of several created as a special project for the AAUW (American Association of University Women). The abstract was prepared by Dorothy Joynes in 1996 for the Voices of Asheville Oral History Collection.

Biography

Jesse Huff was born in North Carolina. Her father raised cattle. She graduated from Mars Hill College and UNC-Chapel Hill, and attended classes at Oxford in England. She joined the AAUW in 1944 when she moved to Asheville. She taught piano in Fletcher, and taught school in Asheville for many years, retiring from Ira B. Jones School (previously Grace School).

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Ira B Jones school and award ; clippings

Restrictions

Cannot be copied

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Wade Huff 

Interview Date and Interviewer

June 1, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photograph ; text

Scope and Contents

Wade Huff describes his time in the army when he worked with high explosives and he talks of his experiences overseas. He explains that he heads a team of "whites and colored together" that fires a salute over a veteran's grave at the family's request. He is active in various other veteran's activities. He talks about how the Burton Street Community has changed over the years.

Biography

Huff came to Asheville in 1939 to join his brother and sister. He worked at Jackson's Sulphur Springs Tourist Court until he joined the service. After the service, he worked at Artmore Furniture Company as a delivery driver and recalls deliveries to unmarked roads and old wagon trail roads. At Artmore he became an expert with oil space heaters when they first came on the market. As a member of American Legion Post 44, he led a team which, at the request of family, fired a salute over the graves of veterans.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photograph of Wade Huff ; clippings

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William and Dorothy Hussey 

Interview Date and Interviewer

July 4, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

William and Dorothy Hussey discuss their experience working to develop the Botanical Gardens on the grounds of UNC Asheville. They describe their efforts to make use of public land, to save endangered plants and transplant them into the gardens, and to raise money as well as the interest of the community. They discuss several different kinds of plants that are in the gardens and various garden clubs that have been involved. The difference between native plants and imported plants is also discussed. Dorothy describes her involvement with abused children and Head Start, and various activities to help the poor and the elderly. William describes his involvement with maintaining the Appalachian Trail, and with Habitat for Humanity. They both describe changes that have occurred in the city over the years.

Biography

Dorothy and William Hussey were involved in the development of the University Botanical Gardens, a project to save endangered plants and create a garden of native plants for the public. Twelve acres were allotted for their project in 1960 by Asheville-Biltmore College (now UNC Asheville). They and other volunteers worked to save plants and flowers that were being destroyed by the construction of buildings and roads, including traveling all over the area to collect and transport plants to the gardens. Dorothy ran bake sales to raise funds for the project, and recruited several garden clubs to help with the project. She was also involved with Family Services, working to counsel girls who were sexually abused. William worked as a volunteer with Habitat for Humanity and helped with maintenance of parts of the Appalachian Trail. Dorothy Hussey died in (2010), and William died on September 1, 2016, aged 96.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of William & Dorothy Hussey, the Botanical Gardens, plantings, church buildings, Trinity Place runaway shelter, Habitat for Humanity, the Allen Center, and the Mineral Society ; brochures ; clippings

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Mary Hyde 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 2, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Mary Hyde discusses her experience working to discover and record the history of Biltmore Village, and her efforts to develop a museum to commemorate the area. She outlines the development of the museum, describing challenges and obstacles that had to be overcome. She gives important details about the history of Biltmore Village, including construction and development of the Biltmore Estate and All Soul's Church, and gives information about several influential members of the community. She describes the development of hospitals, schools and cultural centers in the area. She recounts the Vanderbilt and Cecil family histories, and discusses other changes in the area over time, such as the growth of retirement communities, and discusses problems of unemployment and the loss of industries. She compares the different areas of the city in terms of their different resources and limitations.

Biography

Mary Hyde moved to this area from Chicago in 1980, and worked as a volunteer to meet people. She worked part time for the Red Cross, traveling around the country, and became active in the AAUW in 1985. While trying to create a Food Fair in Biltmore Village as a fund raiser, she became interested in the history of the village. Although the fair never really took off, she became involved in the development of a museum for Biltmore Village history. She also became involved with various other aspects of the community, from the Arden Rotary Club to Civitan and book clubs.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; Photographs of Mary Hyde, Biltmore Village Museum and buildings ; Biltmore Village brochures ; clippings

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Lucius (Craggy) and Esta (Liz) Ingle 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 5, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text ; realia

Scope and Contents

Lucius Ingle discusses his experience working for the railroad before and during the Depression. He describes how his work with steam engines came to an end with the development of the diesel engine, was laid off, and later became a railroad car inspector. He outlines the various duties and responsibilities that his job entailed. Esta discusses her early childhood and education, her experience working for the telephone company, and her first marriage to a man who was killed falling out of a tree. They both discuss changes they have seen in the area over the years, and Lucius describes changes he has seen in the railroads.

Biography

Lucius got the name "Craggy" from the area in which he was born in 1903. In 1923 he went to work for the railroad as a machine helper, working on engines in the roundhouse. With the invention of the diesel engine, he was laid off, and got a job as a car inspector, a job from which he retired in 1968. Esta was born in Reems Creek, and attended a school that ran for only 6 months out of the year. She went to Weaverville High School, and since the school was not accredited at the time the county paid for the students to go to Weaverville College for the remaining 2 years of high school. She won a 2-year scholarship, and got a job working for the telephone company. Her first husband, whom she married at the height of the Depression, was killed when he fell out of a tree. She remained single until 1970, when she married Lucius. Lucius died in 1995, aged 98, and Esta died in 2011.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Lucius & Esta Ingle, railroad scenes, telephone company building, Beaver Lake, and Betty Siberski ; Norfolk Southern keyring and pin ; Great Smoky Mountains Railway brochures, 1996 ; clippings

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Dorothy Jackson 

Interview Date and Interviewer

January 24, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Dorothy Jackson talks about her life, her church and living in the Lee Walker Heights neighborhood. She describes how worked for the R. Stanford Webb family for 30 years, and how the current generation helps her with banking and errands.

Biography

Dorothy Jackson was born in Avery Co. and went to school through the middle of 2nd grade. She learned to read by studying the Bible, which she read six times. She was married for a short time, and she worked for the Webb family for thirty years.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Dorothy Jackson, Church of God in Christ, and Lee Walker Heights ; Church of God in Christ newsletters ; clippings

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John Johnson 

Interview Date and Interviewer

December 19, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

John Johnson discusses the Rainbow Mountain Children's school, an alternative elementary school that attempts to provide children with a holistic education. The school was started by his ex-wife, Aostre Johnson, who left to get her doctorate in education from UNC Greensboro. Johnson describes the development of the school and its program to develop children's emotional, mental, spiritual and moral well-being. He talks about various other types of alternative schools, and discusses issues of racial, economic and social diversity. He also discusses Sufism, a faith that he has been involved in for years. He talks about the various beliefs and tenets of the Sufi faith, and his interest in the healing powers of faith.

Biography

Johnson was raised as an Episcopalian, and began to study for his confirmation at age 12, but he soon became disillusioned with this church, remaining until high school out of ritual. He heard a lecture on Sufism in Italy while he was studying architecture, and became interested and involved. He was director of a Sufi center in Miami when a friend invited him to Asheville to teach in the Newfound School gym in 1976. He later met and married his ex-wife, Aostre, who started the Rainbow Mountain Children's school in 1977. Aostre had a degree in education from Harvard, and developed a holistic philosophy of education that addresses children on five levels: intellectual, mental, emotional, moral, physical and spiritual. Aostre left the school in 1985 to get her doctorate in education, and John later became the director.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of John Johnson ; brochures ; clippings

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(Pinkney) Greer Johnson 

Interview Date and Interviewer

April 6, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Greer Johnson discusses his family history, his education, and his experience working for the city of Asheville for 26 years. He describes various projects in which he was involved, and discusses the planning and development of Asheville as a city. He talks about Weldon Weir, who was city manager during his time of employment, discusses financial problems of the city, and describes interactions between various political figures in the area as they worked to develop better streets, sewers and water systems. He discusses the history of Asheville and the changes that he has seen over time.

Biography

Johnson was born in 1910. He graduated from Asheville High in 1927, and earned a degree in engineering from Chapel Hill in 1931. He worked in Baltimore for a time, until he got a job surveying for the Blue Ridge Parkway in 1935. He served in the US Marine Corp in WWII and after release worked on the Old Ivy Dormitory at Montreat. He built a new hotel in 1946, and then Howerton Hall, a dormitory for 100 girls, in Montreat. He was offered a job by the Asheville city manager, working as head of the city of Asheville's Engineering Department for 26 years. During this time he was responsible for the removal of streetcar tracks, and the development of the Metropolitan Sewerage District. After his retirement from the city, he became involved in politics. He was involved in State legislature when the Water Pollution Control Act was passed. He served on the State Board from 1959-1985, as Chairman of the NC Environmental Management Commission. He died in 1994

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Johnson, and the metropolitan sewage treatment plant ; documents about the sewage treatment plant ; clippings

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Minnie Jones and Mary Williams 

Interview Date and Interviewer

August 2, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Minnie Jones talks about her activities with the NAACP, her church, redevelopment of Eagle St. and the area around the First Baptist Church. Mary Williams, a neighbor of Jones, talks about the YWCA Mother Love program, her family. They both talk about being Democrat volunteers.

Biography

Born Jan 6, 1934 in Spartanburg, SC, Jones came to Asheville in the 1960s. She had a daughter and three foster children. She worked at the Orthopedic Hospital and Irene Wortham School. She was involved in voter registration, homeless and healthcare issues, civil rights and integration, and became precinct chairman for #13 of the Asheville Democratic Party. She was involved with Pisgah Legal Services, and co-founded WNC Community Health Services. Minnie Jones died in 2015, aged 81.

Mary Williams was born in 1970, and when she was fifteen, she moved to Pisgah View apartments, and became a neighbor of Minnie Jones.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; transcript ; interview notes ; photographs of Minnie Jones and Mary Williams, Pisgah View apartments, and Head Start at Pisgah View ; clippings

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Dorothy Joynes 

Interview Dates and Interviewers

February 7 and February 14, 1995 ; Janet Webb and John Toms

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Dorothy Joynes describes her project, the Voices of Asheville Oral History Collection. She discusses her interest in obtaining a broader understanding of history, and that several aspects of this area's history intrigued her, such as the effects of the Depression, the TB epidemic, and the two World Wars. She talks about members of the community whose stories were valuable sources of information, her interest in racial issues and changes in attitudes over the years, and her desire to obtain the histories of all types of people in the community. She describes the methods that she uses for all of her interviews, and talks about how she makes her subjects feel comfortable enough to give their stories. She also discusses the experiences that led her to become involved with oral histories. She discusses her family and her plans for the future.

Biography

Joynes was born in 1920, and took courses in sociology at the University of Delaware and the University of California in Santa Barbara. She was married in 1940, had four children, and divorced in 1955. She married Leslie Joynes in 1960, and had another son, Leslie Jr. During her studies in Santa Barbara she became intrigued with the ways in which communities are woven into an "intricate fabric," and began collecting oral histories, joining the Santa Barbara Historical Society. She and her husband moved to Asheville after living in Santa Barbara for 30 years. She began interviewing all types of people in the Asheville community. For more than three years, she worked on her Voices of Asheville Oral History Project, recording the stories, perspectives, and individual experiences of the residents of a changing and growing area.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Dorothy Joynes and her house, and Lisa Roberts of UNCA Special Collections ; listings of interviews by Dorothy Joynes ; clippings

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Morris and Leah Karpen 

Interview Date and Interviewer

March 3, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Morris Karpen discusses his experience starting a factory in Asheville, describing various aspects of business from training and advertising to unionization. He discusses problems that he saw upon his return to Asheville from New York, and describes changes that he has seen over the years. Leah Karpen discusses her education, the problems that she had finding a job as a woman, and her experience in the Navy, where she met and married Morris. She goes on to discuss her involvements with UNCA, College for Seniors, the League of Women Voters, YWCA, the Jewish Community Center, the World Federation Association and the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. She describes the establishment of the Florence Ryan Fund of the A/B League of Women Voters. Morris discusses Karpen Hall, describing the reasons for and effects of his donation for its construction. They both discuss changes in the University through the years, and talk about the College for Seniors, its problems and benefits. They discuss their current activities and involvement in the community.

Biography

Leah Karpen was born in the Asheville area in 1920, and went to school at David Millard Jr. High and Asheville High, where she graduated at age 15. She then went to the University of North Carolina at Greensboro for two years, where she majored in chemistry. She was accepted at the University at Chapel Hill, and graduated with a bachelor of science degree. She joined the Navy in Vallejo, California, where she took a job drafting. It was here that she met Morris, who was stationed in California during WWII. They were married, lived briefly in Asheville, and then moved to Long Island, NY, where they had four children. They moved back to Asheville, where Morris started a factory that built doors and door frames to be sold to dealers. They were both very active in the community during this time. Leah had had some experience teaching graduate school in Long Island, and became one of the first two women to obtain a Masters of Liberal Arts from UNCA. She taught at UNCA and Warren Wilson, and designed her own courses for the College for Seniors. A donation by the Karpens made possible the construction of Karpen Hall. Leah was on the Board of the YWCA for two years and chaired a long-range planning committee. In 1981 she worked with the Weaverville Library, and chaired the Board for three years. She was elected as President of the League of Women Voters in 1983, went to the National Convention and created the Florence Ryan Education Fund, which enabled the organization to accept non-profit tax exempt funds. She was voted Woman of the Year in 1985. She served as co-chair of the local chapter of the World Federation Association and a member of Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. Morris served on the Board of Trustees of Warren Wilson College, and on the Boy Scout Council, the UNCA Foundation, the Ethics Committee of the Memorial Mission Hospital, and worked with Habitat for Humanity. Morris Karpen died on March 3, 2002, aged 85.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Morris & Leah Karpen, Temple Beth Ha-Tephila and the Jewish Community Center, housing on Martin Luther King Bvld. ; JCC brochure ; clippings

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Barbara Cassat Keleher 

Interview Date and Interviewer

October 6, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Barbara Keleher describes life in Asheville when she arrived in the 1950's. She recounts her decision to run for the Asheville City Council, and the process involved in doing so. She describes her tenure as a member of both the First Union Bank board, and the board of the Asheville Art Museum and her work with the Asheville-Buncombe Charter Commission. Her campaigning experiences with door-to-door canvassing are discussed, along with her views concerning city-county consolidation, annexation, and economic development. She discusses Pack Place, and projects of the Art Museum in which she has been involved. She also discusses her six children.

Biography

Barbara Keleher was born in China in 1918 of missionary parents. Even though they left China when she was five years old, the experience left a lasting influence on the family. She and her husband, Dr. Michael F. Keleher, moved to Asheville in 1949. Although Asheville politics were dominated by the Democratic Party, and Keleher was Republican,she elected to the Asheville City Council in 1969, the first female member. She died in January 2012.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Barbara and Michael Keleher, Mountain Area hospice, Asheville from 75 Livingston St., and the former homer site of the Asheville Art Museum ; brochures ; history of the Red Cross sin Buncombe County ; clippings

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Michael Francis Keleher 

Interview Date and Interviewer

October 13, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Dr. Michael Keleher describes his reasons for moving to Asheville, and his practice in association with Dr. William S. Justice. The mergers of Asheville hospitals, and other aspects of their development, is outlined. He describes the relationship between Mission, St. Joseph's and the Mountain Area Health Education Center ("MAHEC"), and how this relationship has changed over time. He compares the cost of medical service 40 years ago to that of today, and outlines problems with insurance and malpractice. He discusses his efforts to improve medical facilities and the establishment of much needed clinics in Madison County. He also describes his involvement with the Asheville School Board, and discusses his experience with school desegregation, and studies and controversies concerning city-county school system consolidation. He explains the functioning of the blood bank program, and its past public relations efforts.

Biography

Born in Colorado in 1914, Keleher graduated from medical school in 1940 and was a medical officer in the Marine Corps. He continued training at the University of Iowa in 1945, and moved to Asheville with his family in 1949. He was chief of staff for St. Joseph's Hospital, president of the Buncombe County Medical Society, and a member of the Asheville School Board. He was instrumental in the development of the local hospice program. He was on the board of the local Red Cross, becoming involved through the blood program, and was an active member of St. Eugene's Catholic Church, and an arbitrator for the Better Business Bureau. He died on January 21, 2001.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Barbara and Michael Keleher, Mountain Area hospice, Asheville from 75 Livingston St., and the former homer site of the Asheville Art Museum ; brochures ; history of the Red Cross sin Buncombe County ; clippings

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Ray Kisiah 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 16, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Ray Kisiah discusses his experience working as a Parks and Recreation director, first in Charlotte and High Point, then in Asheville. He describes several initiatives that he took to revitalize the park system in Asheville. He describes obtaining funding, and talks about several organizations that were involved. He discusses the development of Montford Recreation Center and Weaver Park, and expresses his concern for the development of recreational areas along the Swannanoa and French Broad Rivers. He describes the tension and the cooperation that exist between the county and the city, and discusses ongoing disagreements over county water systems, water rates, and tax equity. He discusses his personal philosophy.

Biography

Kisiah was Assistant Parks and Recreation Director for 10 years in Charlotte, and then moved to High Point where he used Federal funds to rebuild their park system. He was recruited by Asheville in 1971 to help revitalize the city's park system. He found that the formerly excellent park system had deteriorated since the Depression and needed a lot of work and funds. This was during the time that Urban Renewal and Model Cities programs had just begun, and he created a plan to incorporate these programs into Asheville's park system. He matched the Model City budget of $150,000, obtained Federal funds, acquired land and developed the Montford Recreation Center. He expanded Weaver Park, creating a basketball area, tennis courts, dugouts and picnic facilities. In 1974 he became President of the American Parks and Recreation Society.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Ray Kisiah, and Asheville parks ; Asheville Parks and Recreation brochures ; clippings

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Grace Kouns 

Interview Date and Interviewer

August 23, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Grace Kouns discusses the activities of the Vetust Antiques Study Club, a small organization of 24 members dedicated to the study of antiques. She describes the successful antique fairs sponsored by the club, and discusses her current plans to obtain material to develop a club history. She describes the activities and projects of the club. She also discusses her education and her business activities. She talks about her first husband and his business, the Asheville Livestock Yard, which she continued to manage after his death. She discusses the civic contributions of her brother Billy Wolcott and her son-in-law Charles Worley.

Biography

Born in 1907, in Pennsylvania, Kouns came to Asheville in 1924, at age 16. She went to the Grove Park School for Girls, which later became the Plonk School, and then went on to college at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, which was at that time a women's college. After graduation she worked in medical technology, and married her first husband, Ralph McLean.. Her husband bought the Asheville Livestock Yard, which she continued to manage after his death in 1951, until she sold the business in 1966. She married William Kouns in 1957. Kouns owned a motel, and after William Kouns died in 1964, Grace ran the business until the age of 79. She was active in the Vetust Antiques Study Club, serving as both president and chairman. She died in May 2005.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Grace Kouns, and Woodland Hill neighborhood ; antiques pamphlets and programs ; clippings

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Betty Tenn Lawrence 

Interview Date and Interviewer

November 12, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photograph ; text

Scope and Contents

Betty Tenn Lawrence describes the legal and organizational structures of the preservation process. The organizational histories of the Preservation Society, the Historic resources Commission, and the Genealogical Society are described, along with the legal process and events concerning the Beaucatcher open cut project. A number of the properties which the Preservation Society attempted to save are discussed in terms of successes, failures, and the efficacy of various procedures.

Biography

Betty Lawrence came to Asheville in 1973. She had a degree in History and became the curator of the North Carolina Collection at Pack Memorial Library. Lawrence was instrumental in the formation of the Preservation Society of Asheville and Buncombe County, the Historic Resources Commission and the Old Buncombe County Genealogical Society. She was active in the movement to prevent the I-240 open cut through Beaucatcher Mountain in Asheville, and at that time, developed an interest in legal issues. She attended and graduated from Duke Law School, practiced law in New York for three years, and returned to Asheville in 1987, where she continued to be active in preservation.

Additional Materials

Interview notes ; photograph of Betty Lawrence ; heritage and preservation materials ; clippings

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Harmon M. Lee 

Interview Date and Interviewer

August 5, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Harmon Lee discusses his family business, the delivery of coal and ice. He describes Asheville as it was in his youth, talks about his education, and describes the effects of the Depression. He discusses his involvement with the Eliada Home, and his experience serving as President of the Hospital Board, outlining the development of Asheville's hospital system through the years. He talks about different types of coal, and discusses changes that occurred in industry regulations over the years. He also describes the development of Asheville as a city, the effects of integration, and his current interests and involvements.

Biography

Lee was born in Asheville, as was his father, who was Mayor from 1941-1947. He graduated from Asheville High, and won an appointment to West Point, but flunked the physical. He studied business and accounting in Philadelphia and worked for a short time as a teller in the First National Bank. After his father's heart attack, he went into the coal business. The Carolina Coal and Ice Company was founded in 1890. It became Carolina Fuel Company and, after building an ice plant on Lyman Street, the company joined with another group on Riverside Drive. He came in as a majority owner, becoming Vice-President after the death of Lyons Lee. He also became Chairman of the Board of Asheville Ice and Storage. He was on the board of the Eliada Home, and served as president of both the Hospital Board and the YMCA.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Harmon Lee and Crowfields condominiums ; clippings

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Joe Lingerfelt Jr. and Charlie McAdams 

Interview Date and Interviewer

January 8, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Joe Lingerfelt discusses the hardware business begun by his grandfather in 1929. By offering personal service, they continue to compete with the discount chain stores. Charlie McAdams, longtime store employee, describes his service in the armed forces, and his work at the hardware store.

Biography

Charlie McAdams was born in Greenville, SC, but lived in Asheville from early childhood. He attended Stephens-Lee High School, South East Commercial College, and Blanton's Business College. He was in the army three times, retiring in 1975 after 34 years of service. Charlie began employment with Biltmore Hardware at the age of 13 and worked a total of 66 years. He died in 2009.

Joe Lingerfelt was born in Asheville, and went to Gibbons Hall school, Asheville High School, and Western Carolina. Afterwards, he joined Biltmore Hardware Company, the family hardware store which was started by his grandfather.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Joe Lingerfelt, Charlie McAdams, and Biltmore Hardware store ; clippings

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Marjorie Lockwood 

Interview Date and Interviewer

January 22, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Marjorie Lockwood discusses the Unitarian Universalist Church on Edwin Place, which she joined in 1974. She talks about being the first president of the Asheville-Buncombe League of Women Voters, and how the League was successful in a push to install voting machines in county polling places and in putting a school bond on the ballot. League members also began monitoring the meetings of governmental boards, speaking to civic groups, and holding candidate forums. She talks about the controversy surrounding the I-240 Beaucatcher Mountain cut, and Carolina Power and Light's unsuccessful bid to build a nuclear power plant in the Leicester area. As supervisor of the Soil and Water Conservation District, her major issues were pollution from farms and erosion. During the integration period, Mrs. Lockwood was chosen as the YWCA's director of public affairs. She discusses the Congress on Racial Equality and their plan to come to Asheville to force the integration of restaurants. She describes her participation in a restaurant "sit-in."

Biography

Marjorie Lockwood and her dentist husband moved to Asheville in 1947, after Dr. Lockwood finished his military service, a decision influenced by the presence of a Unitarian church. Marjorie taught high school before marriage and waited to resume teaching until her daughter started college. She had organized a League of Women's Voters chapter in Hopkinsville, Kentucky, and was asked to start one in Asheville. Backed by the League, the American Association of University Women, and the YWCA, Mrs. Lockwood successfully ran for supervisor of the Soil and Water Conservation District.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Marjorie Lockwood, and the former YWCA building ; newsletters ; clippings

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Anthony (Tony) Lord 

Interview Dates and Interviewer

January 18, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes. February 5, 1993 ; recording is Lord talking without an interviewer

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; photographs, text

Scope and Contents

Anthony Lord describes his career as an architect in Asheville. He also discusses his involvement with the Asheville-Buncombe Library System Board of Trustees, which began with his appointment in 1945. He describes the old Pack Memorial Public Library, its lack of space and his push for the larger building on Haywood Street. He describes the Sondley Collection and a stipulation in the document willing it to the library which reserved it for the use of "well-conducted, non-smoking, white people." The will eventually was broken. Lord describes how the first library branch was for Asheville's black residents. He notes that desegregation changed this system.

In a second recording, which does not include an interviewer, Lord talks about the greening of downtown, and describes his urging of city officials to plant trees in downtown Asheville and to save existing trees when new construction occurred. His 1945 donation of two trees for Pritchard Park led eventually to the formation of the city's Tree Commission, which worked with civic groups and utility companies. He discusses the Asheville Art Museum's 1984 show of his watercolors, ironwork and architecture.

Biography

Lord began working with his father, also an architect, in their firm, Lord and Lord. To supplement his income during the Depression, Lord formed Flint Architectural Forgings beside his house on Flint Street in Montford. There, he practiced the blacksmith trade he had learned as a teenager. His grill work can be found in Biltmore Forest homes, the National Cathedral in Washington and at Yale University, his alma mater. In 1941, Lord, four other architects and an engineer formed Six Associates to capture contracts for large government projects. Projects he designed throughout his career include: the Asheville Citizen-Times building, the Black Mountain Branch Library and the complex housing the West Branch Library; the Montreat Commercial Center; and the D. Hiden Ramsey Library at UNCA. Tony Lord retired in 1971, and died in Asheville in 1993, aged 93.

Additional Materials

Abstract [both recordings]; transcript [Jan. 18, 1993] ; interview notes ; photographs of Tony Lord and his home on Flint Street ; pamphlets about Pack Library ; retrospective of Lord's artwork [copy] ; clippings

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Bascom Lamar Lunsford's Daughters [Jo Herron, Lynn Hadley, Nelle Greenawald, Merton Brown] 

Interview Date and Interviewer

July 25, 1996 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

The Lunsford sisters discuss their life growing up together in a small, rural community, describing aspects of their daily life and early education. They describe their father's interest in folk music and square dancing, which was frowned upon by people in the church, who felt dancing to be a sin. Despite this,they have fond memories of their father's singing and dancing, and explain how he got the whole community involved in it. They talk about the Mountain Dance and Folk Festival, which their father was instrumental in starting.

Biography

The sisters grew up in the rural community of South Turkey Creek, living in a small house without electricity. They went to elementary school in a two-room schoolhouse, and were later bussed to high school in Leicester. Although the community was very religious, and the preacher strongly disapproved, their father became involved with square dancing and eventually got much of the community involved in it as well. Dancing was considered "devil's work" by the preacher, and although the family was religious, they didn't agree, and saw dancing as a way to bring the community together. Their father started the hugely successful Mountain Dance and Folk Festival. After his death, a CD compilation of his recordings was made with funding from the North Carolina Arts Council Folk Life Program, as well as the Smithsonian Folkways. Lunsford's daughter Jo Herron and Wayne Martin of the NC Arts Council co-produced the recording.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of the daughters of Bascom Lamar Lunsford, Leicester Highway, South Turkey Creek Road, Lunsford's home and area ; audio cassette of "Ballads, banjo tunes and sacred songs of WNC", by Lunsford ; booklet celebrating 75 years of the Mountain Dance and Folk Festival ; festival pamphlets ; clippings and copies of articles about Bascom Lamar Lunsford

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Cheryl Lunsford 

Interview Date and Interviewer

March 9, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Cheryl Lunsford discusses her career with the Asheville Police Department, which she joined in 1977. She describes hiring, investigation and training procedures, outlining the progress of a typical officer's career, and discusses the difference between state and city systems. She also describes different divisions of officers, and gives details about the internal organization of the department. She discusses women in the police force, and describes changes that have occurred in the department and in the city over the years. She talks about the increasing amount of drug use and violence in schools, and discusses the causes of this as well as steps that the department takes to prevent and discourage this.

Biography

Lunsford was born in Fairview, graduated from Reynolds High School, and joined the Police Department in 1977. She worked in the records room for 10 years, and then worked with four mayors. She is now the senior secretary to the Chief of Police and was responsible for the publication of a book about the department.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Cheryl Lunsford and Asheville police and fire department building ; APD Commemorative Album, 1992 [copy] ; City of Asheville newsletter ; clippings

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Ann and Robert MacPherson 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 15, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photograph ; text

Scope and Contents

Robert MacPherson describes his involvement with the Universalist Church and discusses his decision to become a minister. He discusses the merger of the Unitarians and the Universalists, and describes changes in the church over the years. Ann MacPherson discusses her early religious involvement, her education, and her experience teaching day school in the church where Bob was assistant minister. They discuss their marriage, the birth of their two sons, their travels, and their eventual move to Asheville. They describe the Unitarian church on Vermont Avenue which they attended, and outline the development of the church from the time that they arrived to the present. They describe Asheville as they first knew it and discuss their current contributions to the community.

Biography

Robert MacPherson was born in Summerville, a suburb of Boston. He became interested in music through the junior choir of his church. He participated in the Universalist youth group, serving as president, and helped bring about the merger with the American Unitarian youth group, which together became the Liberal Religious Youth (LRY). He decided to become a minister and was influenced by a radical dean in Tufts theological school. He was ordained by the State Universalist Convention. His first pulpit was in Cleveland when Universalism and Unitarianism merged. Ann, a day school teacher, was teaching in the church where he was assistant minister. They married and spent 3 years in Cleveland, then going to Boston and then to Maine. Robert took a small pulpit and became a full-time graduate student in Syracuse specializing in speech and hearing. He worked with the Veteran's Administration in St. Petersburg, Florida. They had two sons. When they came to Asheville in 1971, they joined the Unitarian Universalist Church, and Robert was asked to be chairman of the professional division for the United Way. He also became active in the ACT, and Ann worked with the Art Museum in Pack Place. Ann MacPherson died in 2015.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photograph of Ann & Robert MacPherson ; outline of the Red Cross in Buncombe Co. ; clipping

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Nancy Marlowe 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 9, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Nancy Marlowe describes her early work experience, discusses her move to Asheville, and describes the city as she saw it when she arrived. She discusses her work for the Asheville Citizen-Times, describing specific interviews and stories she has covered. She describes changes she has seen in the city over time, and talks about Asheville's potential for greater development. She discusses the lack of Black presence in the area, attributing this more to isolation than prejudice. She talks about her current responsibilities as Features Editor of the Citizen-Times.

Biography

Nancy Marlowe came to Asheville in 1968, after working as a loan officer and then as Society Editor for the Lakeland Ledger in Florida, where she also served on the Governor's staff in Tallahassee. Upon her arrival in Asheville, she applied to the Chamber of Commerce, worked temporarily at the television station, and finally came to the Citizen Times in 1971. At first she reported weddings and funerals,before becoming a feature writer, reporting human-interest stories. Active in support groups for men and women, she was given the NC Press Association prize for an early article about "friendly mountaineers." She developed a special interest in medical writing, and at the time of the interview, was Features Editor, responsible for bringing the various areas together for the balance of contents.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Nancy Marlowe ; clippings

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Dee Mason 

Interview Date and Interviewer

September 14, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Dee Mason outlines her education, her experience teaching, and her involvement with the Junior League and the Arts Council in Durham, NC. She describes how she came to work for the Durham newspaper as a feature writer of social events, and how she attempted to create her own newspaper in Raleigh called "City." She discusses her move from Durham to Asheville and her involvement with the Arts Alliance and Pack Place, and how she and a friend started a business planning special events. She talks about the difference between Durham and Asheville, describing issues of privacy, race relations, tolerance, diversity, and minority voice. She discusses Asheville's development over time, and expresses her interest in the revitalization of downtown.

Biography

Dee Mason was born in Durham, NC, and graduated with a bachelor's degree from Duke and a master's from UNC Chapel Hill graduate school. She majored in English in college, and published a play called, "It's All Greek to Me." She married out of school, taught school for three years, and then stayed home to raise her family. She joined the Durham Paper, covering social events, before becoming a feature writer, interviewing people in the community. When her youngest son went to college she got a divorce and started her own paper in Raleigh called "City." The timing for publication, however, was not right, and the paper did not survive. She returned to the Durham Paper as a columnist and feature writer. She moved to Asheville at age 50. When a friend of hers from Durham moved here also, they started a business together, and planned the major event for the opening of the Heart Building of Memorial Mission Hospital. They formed a limited partnership, and called their company "In Every Event." She was called by the Executive Director of the Arts Alliance, and was hired for 6 months to plan a special event for the Alliance. She became the sustaining advisor to the Skylines, the local Junior League publication, and worked with the Chamber of Commerce for leads, setting up conferences and meeting places. In addition. she sold space in Pack Place for parties and weddings.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Dee Mason, her home, and Rock Cafe in Marshall, NC ; "Sustainer Notes" ; "Junior League Skylights" ; clippings

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Maggie Masters 

Interview Date and Interviewer

November 14, 1992 ; Sylvia Robin

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; clippings

Scope and Contents

Maggie Masters discusses her education, her marriage, divorce, and her experience raising her son as a single mother. She describes meeting her second husband, Gus Masters, in a ceramics course, and how they became involved with metal enameling. She talks about their move to Western North Carolina, and their involvement with the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild. She also discusses their experience teaching enameling at the John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown, NC. She discusses the area of Brasstown and its lack of cultural opportunities. She talks about the lack of minorities, both Blacks and Native Americans, and discusses the difference between this area and California.

Biography

Maggie Masters graduated from high school in California in 1929. She lived with her family in the earlier part of the Depression and attended Pasadena City College for two years. She married and had a son, but later left her husband and became a single parent. She worked, and was involved with the Palo Alto Theater. With her second husband Gus Masters, she began working with metal enameling and, after visiting Western North Carolina, they settled near Brevard, NC in 1955.They joined the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild, working as enamelists in various locations in the mountains. They were then asked to teach enamel work at the John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown in 1963, and were co-directors of the school from 1974-1976. During this time they expanded the school's programs and maintained a studio on campus. One of the school's founders, Marguerite Bidstrup, left four acres near the school to them, and they built a home there. She retired in 1992, after which she studied creative writing at a nearby community college. She died in 2010 at the age of 98.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Maggie Masters ; "The Masters' Story, 1955-1985" ; brochure ; John C Campbell Folk School 1993 program ; clippings

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Richard and Jane Matthews 

Interview Date and Interviewer

December 5, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Jane and Richard Matthews discuss their interest in historic preservation, and outline the development of the Manor Inn area from the time that they moved there. They discuss their book, The Manor and Cottages, published in 1991. Jane talks about her involvement with the Junior League, the League of Women Voters, and the Preservation Society. Richard discusses his work as foreman for the renovation of Richmond Hill. He discusses the racial and economic diversity of the Montford area. Jane discusses the current projects of the Preservation Society and some of the problems that it faces with redevelopment. Richard names organizations that are devoted to a higher level of civic commitment, such as the Preservation Society, the Historic Resource Commission, the Western North Carolina Association of Genealogical Organizations, the Western Regional Office of State Division of Archives and History, and Neighborhood Revitalization Organizations. He describes his involvement with the Neighborhood Housing Service, where he helps residents become self-reliant, and discusses different housing needs. They discuss Habitat for Humanity, the construction of the Jewish Community Center, and their current involvements with the community.

Biography

Richard came to Asheville in 1978, where he and Jane met in 1981.They were both interested in the preservation of historic buildings, Jane being an architect, while Richard worked in construction. Together they co-authored a book called The Manor and Cottages, published in 1991. The book was written in 1.5 years, the first year being spent in establishing a historic district, and in securing grants for printing and publishing. Richard was also involved in the Richmond Hill renovation, acting as foreman for construction. Jane worked on restoring their historic home, was active in the League of Women Voters, the Junior League and the Preservation Society, where she served as President. Richard later became executive director of Neighborhood Housing Service, assisting residents in becoming self-reliant, whilst Jane became involved with the Community Research Project Development Committee, and the development of the Jewish Community Center.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Richard and Jane Matthews, and the Jewish Community Center ; clippings and brochures related to, Riverlink , the Preservation Society, Albermarle Park, Montford, and Richmond Hill

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Marjorie Maxwell and Elizabeth Jackson 

Interview Date and Interviewer

March 24, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Marjorie Maxwell talks about changes in her formerly close-knit, Southside Ave. neighborhood. She talks about the pride everyone took in the neighborhood before redevelopment. She mentions the idea that the churches sold out to the city during redevelopment. She recalls the time in Asheville when the Army took over the hotels. Elizabeth Jackson, Marjorie's mother, talks about her family, and life in Asheville during the Depression.

Biography

Marjorie Maxwell was born in Asheville on McDowell Street, July 24, 1926. She attended Livingston St. School and St. Anthony's School. She worked as a waitress in various cafeterias around town, fondly recalling the S&W. Her singing career took her to clubs all over the East. She later worked for Stanley Products before being hired by the Asheville Housing Authority where she worked as a receptionist for fifteen years. Her mother, Elizabeth Jackson, was born in 1905 and was part African-American and part Cherokee. She was brought up with a foster family, and she worked as a maid. She moved in with her daughter in 1956. Elizabeth Jackson died in 1994, and Marjorie Maxwell died in 2009.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Marjorie Maxwell, Elizabeth Jackson, the Tabernacle Missionary Baptist Church, and St. Lawrence Basilica ; clippings

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Glenn May, Nancy and Frank Leppert, and Chris Perry 

Interview Date and Interviewer

March 4, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Nancy and Glenn discuss their experience growing up in West Asheville during the Depression. They describe the development of West Asheville through the years, remembering what it was like in their youth and listing specific places and people that were central to the life of the city. Frank discusses his experience serving in the army, as well as his experience helping run the family grocery store upon his return to Asheville. They all discuss the interior of the market, various aspects of how it was run, and changes that have occurred over the years. Nancy and Glenn discuss segregation, and the effects of integration. Frank describes his attempt to get the city and county to have one fire department, police and library, and discusses the problems and obstacles that came along with this issue. He also discusses his various involvements in the community. Chris discusses his involvement with the technical aspect of Community Theatre and with the Episcopal Church, as well as his plans to study music and art in the future. He talks about his experiences in school and in the community.

Biography

Nancy and Glenn May's family moved to West Asheville in 1924, and their father opened May's Market during the Depression, and although they were poor, they didn't know it. Nancy attended Vance School from kindergarten to the 7th grade. Later, she attended Biltmore College. Glenn, worked for the family business, delivering groceries on a bicycle. Nancy began working at the market right before her daughter was born in 1945, stayed off for 5 years and then went back to work until the store was closed. Glenn went to college in 1948, working at the market only during the summers and when he was on leave from the service. He worked at Enka for 8 years, and then Kinco Corp. for 22 years. He was Director of Outpatients at the Memorial Hospital in Chapel Hill, and when he came back to Asheville he worked as a public accountant. Frank Leppert was born in the Mission Hospital, and raised on Haywood St. He went to the 91st Infantry Division in 1942, right after he married Nancy. He served in Africa and Italy, and worked for May's Market upon his return in 1944. After Nancy's father died, she and Frank ran the store until they decided to sell. Frank was President of the West Asheville Business Association, the West Asheville Lion's Club, the Buncombe County Heart Association, and served on the board of the Asheville Merchant Association, the Board of Directors of the Aston Hospital, the Board of the NC Food Dealers, the Arts Council, and was treasurer of his church. Chris Perry, the adopted grandson of the Lepperts, was involved in Community Theatre, as well as being an acolyte in the Episcopal Church. At the time of the interview, he planned to go to Berea College to study art and music through a work/study program. Frank Leppert died in 2004, at the age of 83, and Nancy Leppert died in 2015, aged 91.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of the interviewees, May's Market, the Leppert's home, Ideal Drug store, Rob Neufeld, the old feed store and Farmer's Market on Lexington Ave., and West Asheville Park ; clippings

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Eileen McCabe 

Interview Date and Interviewer

January 13, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Much of the interview consists of McCabe's description of the individual histories, and later merger, of the Haseltine School and Asheville Country Day School. Later she describes the merger of Asheville Country Day School and St. Genevieve of the Pines to form Carolina Day School, and the relationship between the two schools prior to that time. She discusses many of the outstanding past faculty members, and the various principals of the school over the years. She also talks about her years of teaching, including social and political attitudes in the late 1960s and 1970s

Biography

Eileen McCabe's father was an author, and her mother taught at St. Joan of Arc School, Haseltine School, and Asheville Country Day School. She attended St. Joan of Arc School, Lee Edwards High School, St. Genevieve's Junior College, and Dunbarten College. She later taught at St. Genevieve's School and Asheville Country Day School, where she was chair of the English department. In observance of Asheville Country Day's fiftieth anniversary, she authored a book titled, An Uncommon School, published in 1986 (before the St. Genevieve's merger), on the history of Asheville Country Day. McCabe died in 2007, aged 77.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Eileen McCabe ; copies of pages from "An Uncommon School" ; clippings

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Frances McDowell 

Interview Date and Interviewer

August 11, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Frances McDowell talks about the early settlers of Asheville, from whom both she and her husband are descended. She discusses her efforts to create a museum in the historic Smith-McDowell House. The house was leased in 1974 by the Western North Carolina Historical Association and the Junior League, and McDowell was made head of the restoration committee. She describes the campaign to obtain funds from the North Carolina Legislature, the hiring of directors for the house, and the establishment of other positions. The relationship between the Smith-McDowell House board and the Western North Carolina Historical Association is described, along with current operations, funding, and future plans.

Biography

McDowell was born in Asheville and attended school here. She was employed by the Asheville Citizen-Times, and later worked at the Veterans Administration, where she retired after 30 years as chief of the finance section. She became interested in genealogy in the early 1960s after the death of her sister, who had written about their grandparents. In 1973 she began taking courses in history and genealogy at Asheville-Buncombe Technical Institute. The Western North Carolina Historical Association and the Junior League began leasing the Smith-McDowell House in 1974 from A-B Tech, and restoration of the house began immediately, with Mrs. McDowell as head of the restoration committee. She and other members traveled to Raleigh for advice and fund-raising, with additional funds raised locally from both the city and county governments, and from various projects. Frances McDowell died in 1998.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Frances McDowell, the Smith-McDowell House, Fernihurst, and Givens estate ; "A history of Fernihurst" ; leaflets for the Smith-McDowell House and WNC Historical Association ; clippings

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Glenda I. McDowell 

Interview Date and Interviewer

March 14, 1997 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Glenda McDowell describes her experiences as a student in Asheville when schools were integrated, how she left Asheville, became membership director of the Air Traffic Controllers Organization, and joined the National Guard, before returning to Asheville, and discovering meditation. She describes the South Beaumont St. and Eagle St area of Asheville before urban renewal, and her work as a mediator at Asheville High School, helping students with conflict resolution and helping other teachers deal with the needs of black students.

Biography

Glenda McDowell was born in Morganton, NC on 1950, and came to Asheville when she was nine years old. She attended Mountain Street Elementary School (later called Lucy B. Herring) and David Millard schools, before spending a year at Allen High School. Her mother sent her north with family members to attend John Adams High School in Cleveland, Ohio, and she graduated in 1969. She returned to Asheville and worked in the area, before attending airline school. After graduating she went to Washington D.C. where she became membership director of Air Traffic Controllers Organization (PATCO). She decided to become a single parent, and at 29, she had a daughter, and at 39 she had a second child. She decided never to go on welfare. She joined the National Guard but, because of the children, refused to go to Desert Storm. She returned to Asheville because her mother was ill, and became coordinator of Peers Addressing Conflict Together (PACT) at Asheville School.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Glenda McDowell, and MLK Drive ; clippings

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Roger McGuire 

Interview Date and Interviewer

January 1, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Roger McGuire discusses his involvement with several Unitarian churches, describing his experience serving as chairman of the church board in Birmingham, Alabama during the Civil Rights marches. He discusses his move to Asheville in 1980, and describes his first impressions of the city, which was in desperate need of revitalization. He discusses the bond issue battle and various plans to bring commerce into the city, citing new enterprises as examples of improvement, such as the Health Adventure, Art Museum, YMI Cultural Center, Café on the Square, Blue Moon Bakery, Asheville Wine Co., Laurey's Catering, etc. He also discusses the conflict between natives and newcomers in the area. He talks about the various roles that Riverlink, Quality Forward, and the Downtown Association play in city development. He discusses various sectors of the community, and their involvements with the revitalization of downtown.

Biography

Born in 1928, McGuire was son of a Roman Catholic father and a Southern Baptist mother, and was brought up in the Christian Science Church. He and his family first joined the Unitarian Church in Park Forest, Illinois, around 1954.They moved to Grosse Pointe, Michigan and then to Birmingham, Alabama, where he was chairman of the church board during the Civil Rights marches. He worked in publishing for the Progressive Farmer Co. and the Southern Living Magazine. He retired in 1980, moved to Asheville and bought a farm. Seeing that new facilities were desperately needed, he and his wife became interested in the revitalization of downtown, and Roger served as chairman of the revitalization project until 1984. Over the course of a decade, a home for the Health Adventure, Art Museum, YMI Cultural Center and a small theatre became a reality. His wife, Pat, served on the board of the NC Humanities Council, which is affiliated with the National Endowment for Humanities, and worked the Downtown Streetscape Committee, the Urban Trail. Roger McGuire died in 1994.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; transcript ; interview notes ; photographs of Roger McGuire, award for Patricia McGuire, 60 Haywood Street, and Biltmore Avenue stores ; papers by McGuire for the Pen & Plate Club ; funeral program for Roger McGuire ; brochures ; clippings

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Gerald B. McMillan 

Interview Date and Interviewer

August 12, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Gerald McMillan discusses his education, and the death of his father due to his work on a turpentine plantation. He describes farm work during his youth. He outlines the conversion of local hotels into military facilities, and aspects of life in Asheville during and after World War II. He talks about his marriage and his travels around the Southeast, working as a reviewer, photoengraver and freelance photographer. He discusses unions during this period, and changes in racial relations over the years. He describes how Depression affected city dwellers and farm dwellers differently, and he mentions the local production of legal and illegal alcoholic beverages. He discusses his wife, children and other family members.

Biography

McMillan started school at the nearby Presbyterian Church, and subsequently attended school in Weaverville, the "Farm School" in Swannanoa (later Warren-Wilson College), and Mars Hill College, where he studied writing. He joined the Air Force in 1942. After his discharge he married and he and his wife moved to Miami, where he sold shoes and worked for the Miami Herald. They returned to Asheville due to his wife's pregnancy and the Florida heat. He then continued to work as a reviewer, photoengraver, and freelance photographer in Asheville, Florida, Charlotte, Hendersonville, and Columbus, Ohio. [His mother is Bonnell Honeycutt, and her oral history is also in this collection.]

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Gerald McMillan and his mother, Bonnell Honeycutt ; poem by Bonnell Honeycutt ; clipping

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Erline L. McQueen 

Interview Date and Interviewer

March 16, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Erline McQueen describes the thriving black community in the Market-Eagle Street area before integration and redevelopment. She talks about her restaurant, The Ritz, that was an important part of that community for more than thirty years. She describes her work as president of the Asheville ladies auxiliary of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, and as a member of the Asheville Transit Authority and the board of the Asheville Civic Center.

Biography

Born June 24, 1912, Erline McQueen, the oldest of 5 girls and 4 boys, grew up on a farm in Uree (now Lake Lure). The children helped their father sell produce in Asheville. For 32 years from 1942, she ran the Ritz Restaurant on Market Street, serving three meals a day between 6am and 11pm. She was appointed by City Council to serve on the Asheville Transit Authority. Her husband was a Pullman porter, and for many years she was chair of the Asheville ladies auxiliary of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. Erline McQueen died at her Asheville home November 26, 2007, at the age of 95.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Erline McQueen, her home, Hopkins Chapel, Eagle and South Market Street ; clippings

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Phillip M. Merrell 

Interview Date and Interviewer

April 22, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Phillip Merrell discusses his family history, and his experience of growing up in rural Madison County during the Depression. He describes his education, and working on a farm as a boy, the changes brought about by rural electrification, and the effect that better road construction had on the railroad system. He talks about serving in the Marine Corps during the Korean War, and the effect that the war had on him afterwards. He gives his opinion about the Vietnam War, and discusses the various reactions of people in this area toward the Vietnam veterans. He refers to drug use, alcoholism, and health restrictions on tobacco. He talks about the car museum at Biltmore Industries, and outlines changes that have occurred in the city over the years, particularly in relation to the Grove Park Inn, the railroad system, highways, and airplane service.

Biography

Merrell's ancestors settled in Western North Carolina in 1792. He grew up working on a Madison County farm that raised cows, corn and tobacco, attending the Walnut School and the Red Hill Free Will Baptist Church. Following graduation from high school he served for 4 years in the Marine Corp during the Korean War. After the war he worked as brakeman and conductor for the railroad for 27 years, before working at the Antique Car Museum at the Biltmore Homespun Shops.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Phillip Merrell ; postcard from car museum ; clippings

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Kenneth M. Michalove 

Interview Date and Interviewer

July 18, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Kenneth Michalove discusses his experience growing up in Asheville, describing the segregated city as it was in his childhood. He talks about his education and his experience working as a business manager for Opportunity Corporation, where he was a part of many changes in public facilities, schools and housing. He discusses his involvement with downtown urban renewal, describing federal and local programs, and issues of finance. He cites initiatives that the city has taken, and outlines various reactions to these initiatives. He talks about several environmental issues involved in urban renewal. He discusses community groups that have organized to obtain funds, and discusses the difference between these groups and special interest groups. He reviews the planning of the civic center placement. He discusses Asheville's water source, sewage disposal system, and environmental restrictions on waste disposal. He describes various obstacles that have hampered city development, and lists important changes that have improved it over the years.

Biography

Michalove was born in 1938 at the old Mission Hospital, and was raised in Asheville. He graduated from Lee Edwards High School in 1956, and attended the University of North Carolina, then Springfield College in Massachusetts. He graduated from Springfield with a degree in Recreation and Physical Education, and was married in 1959. He was in Durham, NC during integration, and then came back to Asheville, working for Opportunity Corporation as a business manager from 1964-1968. He worked on downtown urban renewal, which involved the Civic Center and the East Riverside Development. He has been a part of many changes over the past 30 years, serving as city manager, member of Asheville City Council and Mayor of Asheville. He left his job as city manager to work for St. Joseph's Hospital. His businesses included the Biltmore Center, the Summit Retirement Community, a Pharmacy, and a Catering Service.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Kenneth Michalove ; clippings

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Sallie Ellington Middleton 

Interview Dates and Interviewer

March 13, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Middleton discusses her family history, and the contributions of her uncle and father to various important buildings in the city. She describes her experience growing up in Chunn's Cove and talks about the area as it was in her youth. She talks about her home that her uncle and father built out of scraps and donated materials, and describes the changes in the house over the years. She discusses her education and her childhood interest in art, describing the development of her career as a nature artist. She talks about the Cold War and changes in attitudes and in opportunities for women over the years. She also discusses the constraints on creativity that come with producing artwork under a deadline.

Biography

Sallie Middleton was born in Washington in 1926 where her mother's parents were living. Her parents moved to Asheville because of a building boom in the city, and her father and uncle were a team in building the First Baptist Church, City Hall, the S&W Cafeteria and the high school. She didn't go to school until she was 9 years old, attending the National Cathedral School and the Plonk School of Creative Arts. She was interested in art throughout her childhood, and painted pictures of flowers and nature as a hobby. When her daughter was born, however, she started to sell her paintings, and began her career as an artist. Sallie Middleton died in 2009.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Sallie Middleton, her home and artwork, Asheville City Hall ; art catalogs for Middleton's work ; clippings

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William (Bill) Moore 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 20, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Bill Moore discusses his education and experience with architecture and city planning. He describes his work achievements, citing Model City plans, public housing, and his involvement with the Blue Ridge Parkway. He describes his interest in a modern architectural movement that seeks to produce structures that are in harmony with nature, citing Frank Lloyd Wright as one of his major influences. He discusses Asheville's downtown, noting problems that he sees with its revitalization, as well as potential sources of improvement. He describes changes over the years, and mentions the Grove Arcade, Pack Place and the S&W Cafeteria. He also discusses many of the old homes in Montford that are being restored by the Preservation Society. He describes his involvement as architect of the Unitarian Church on Charlotte Street.

Biography

After graduating from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Moore moved to Asheville in 1963 to work in city planning. He worked with several other architects until 1965, when he opened his own firm. He cooperated with city planners on Model City plans and worked on public housing with the Mountainside Apartments. He also worked on the Blue Ridge Parkway and the Sliding Rock Bathhouse. He became involved with the Unitarian Church on Vermont Street in 1963, and was instrumental in the construction of the new sanctuary on Charlotte Street. He was given the Environmental Award for his house and the ALA Honors Award for the rest area on the Biltmore Estate.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; transcript ; interview notes ; photographs of Bill Moore and Montford gym ; clippings

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Robert and Linda Morgan 

Interview Date and Interviewer

March 6, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Robert Morgan discusses his experience growing up in Asheville, the effects of the Depression, and his father's furniture business. He describes his education and his interest in flying, which led him to join the Army Air Corps, earning his wings in 1941, shortly after Pearl Harbor. He discusses his work after the war, which included working for his father's furniture plant, purchasing a Volkswagen dealership, and joining a real estate firm. Linda discusses her experience growing up as an Air Force child, her interest in flying, and her involvement with the International Council of Air Shows, where she works as a planner for special events. Through her career, she met and married Robert in 1992. They both discuss Robert's World War II bomber, "Memphis Belle." Robert describes his experience talking to high school students about WWII history, and Linda discusses differences between their generation and hers, feeling a sense of apathy among the young and a breakdown in family structure.

Biography

Robert Morgan was born in 1918 and lived in Asheville where his father was general manager for a furniture company. With the onset of the Depression, his father's plant in Black Mountain closed, and the family moved to a home on the Biltmore Estate. He attended Newton School until the 6th grade, and Episcopal High School for a year. After the death of his mother, he lived with an aunt in Indianapolis, Indiana, where he went to Short Ridge High School and played basketball. After graduation he returned to Asheville and worked for one winter in the furniture company before deciding to go to college. He went to Washington and attended the Emerson Institute, where he became valedictorian of his class. He later graduated from the University of Pennsylvania. After college he learned to fly and joined the Army Air Corps, getting his second Lieutenant bars and wings in 1941, just after Pearl Harbor. He flew the "Memphis Belle", the first American bomber to complete twenty five bombing runs over Europe and return to the United States without losing a single crew member. After the war he stayed in the army reserve, and worked with his brother in his father's plant in Black Mountain and in Woodfin. The plants were sold after his father's death, and he bought a Volkswagen dealership in Virginia. He later joined a real estate firm. He died in 2004, aged 85.

Linda is an Air Force child, and lived all over the US. She got her pilot's license at age 21, and became involved with the Women's Pilots Organization called "Women 99." She works with the International Council of Air Shows which meets annually in November in Las Vegas. In 1985 the women's pilot group inherited the sponsorship of the US Precision Flight Team. When Linda learned there would be 16 teams coming from 16 countries, she worked out the detailed international requirement regarding transportation, meals, entertainment, etc. This launched her career in planning special events. In 1990 she saw "Memphis Belle" and booked Bob and his co-pilot. They were married in 1992.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Robert and Linda Morgan, and their home, David Morgan furniture store, Robert Morgan and the crew of the Memphis Belle ; clippings

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Ralph D. Morris Jr. 

Interview Date and Interviewer

October 3, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Ralph Morris talks about his education, experience serving in the Army Air Force during WWII, and his later involvement with his father's jewelry manufacturing business. He discusses the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild, and describes various jewelry designs that he manufactures, and changes in the business over the years. He gives his opinion regarding the trend of businesses moving from the center of town into the malls. He describes his involvement with the Rotary Club, City Council, and the Water Authority. He outlines various problems and issues concerning the Buncombe County water system, discussing the water bond issue, health threats, water treatment, dam construction and timbering on the watershed.

Biography

Ralph Morris was born in 1927 in Rock Hill, SC, and moved to Asheville with his family in 1936. He entered the Newton School in the 5th grade, went to David Millard for junior high, and graduated from Lee Edwards High School. He joined the Army Air Force in 1944 and, when Germany surrendered, he joined the Navy. After graduating from the University of North Carolina, he joined his father in the Stuart Nye jewelry manufacturing business, one of the first members of the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild. The first craft fair was in Gatlinburg in 1948. He now has 7-8 different outlets for his jewelry in Asheville. In 1952 he joined the Rotary Club, and became the youngest president, serving from 1959-1960. He served five consecutive terms on Asheville City Council from 1971-1979 and as Vice Mayor 1979-1981. He also served for 9 years on the Water Authority from 1981-1991 and as Chairman from 1985-1991, and completed six years (1996-2002) as Chairman of the ABC Board. He died in January 2012, aged 84.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Ralph Morris, Guild Crafts, and Stuart Nye jewelry store ; Stuart Nye brochures ; Asheville Water Authority materials ; clippings

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Thomas Morrissey 

Interview Date and Interviewer

April 20, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Thomas Morrissey discusses his experience serving as Sheriff of Buncombe County, and outlines changes that have occurred in law enforcement over the years. He describes changes during his time in office, discussing his emphasis on order and structure. He explains the continuity in government and democratic procedures. He discusses the development of a drug problem in this area, and describes the jail system, listing problems of overcrowding, unsafe conditions, and the failure of rehabilitation.

Biography

Morrissey intended to go into interior design, but worked instead for a manufacturing concern. Afterwards, he conducted work for the army until May 15, 1964. He was assigned to Asheville as a special agent working for counter intelligence, and in 1970 was persuaded to run for the position of Sheriff of Buncombe County on a campaign of professionalism. In his term of service, he emphasized training and organization, and he made physical changes in the jail to improve crowded conditions, as well as social changes. He helped to work out comprehensive plans for the operation of jails and detention facilities. He was chairman of the National Detention and Correction Committee. He was on the vestry of Trinity Lutheran Church, and instigated a home for runaway children called Trinity Place. Before this,runaway children were taken to juvenile detention facilities or to jail.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Thomas Morrissey, Buncombe County jails, Craggy Prison, and Trinity Place ; Buncombe County Sheriff Dept. Report 1977 ; "The generation gap the crime gap", 1977 ; clippings

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Brigitte Oliphant 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 7, 1995 ; Wilbur Oliphant [Abstract by Dorothy Joynes]

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Brigitte Oliphant discusses her move to Asheville from Southern California, describing the aspects of the area that attracted her and her husband. She talks about her involvement with the Unitarian Church and the College for Seniors. She gives a brief history of her life, and talks about how she met and married her husband in Europe, moving with him to the United States.

Biography

Bridgette Oliphant was born in Switzerland, where she met Wilbur, an American citizen who had studied in Europe and returned there with the Air Force, in 1948. They were married in 1952 in Zürich, and came to the US in 1953 where the first of their five children was born. She became a naturalized citizen in 1964. She and her husband moved to Asheville from Southern California, seeking a place with a Unitarian Church and a University environment.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs Brigette and Wilbur Oliphant, and the Unitarian Universalist church ; "The Influence of Retirement In-Migration on Local Economic Development," William H. Hass, PhD ; papers on retirement ; clippings

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Edith Overby 

Interview Date and Interviewer

April 25, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Edith Overby discusses her experience working for WLOS television station, and outlines many of the major changes she has seen through the years. She gives an outline of the station's history and development, and talks about the expansion that became necessary with the advent of color film. She talks about the struggle to present honest, forthright news. She discusses competition for advertising money and cooperation with other media, such as newspaper and radio. She describes various programs in terms of their appeal to a specific audience and how the preferences of the audience change over time. She describes changes in equipment, programming, and in every aspect of the business. She also discusses the responsibility of the station to serve the needs of the community, and talks about how they respond to the changing needs of their audience.

Biography

Edith and her husband moved to Asheville from Washington D.C., seeking a good place to raise their son. She got a job working for WLOS in 1962. At the time of the interview, she had worked for the station for 32 years.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Edith Overby, WLOS, and TCI cable ; TV schedules ; TCI cable materials ; clippings

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Harley Elmer Ownbey 

Interview Dates and Interviewer

April 1, 1994 and April 6, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Harley Ownbey discusses his experience growing up in rural East Asheville, and describes the effects of the Depression. He outlines his education, military experience,and his career with the US Postal Service. He talks about the postal delivery system, and discusses changes he has observed through the years. He also discusses changes in attitudes over time,in regard to work ethic and taking pride in one's job. He talks about the difference between the rural life of his childhood and the city of today, discussing the poverty of the Depression,the effects of integration and racial conflicts, changes that occurred in the city during redevelopment, and the loss of family intimacy due to advances in technology.

Biography

Ownbey was born in 1921 in East Asheville, and grew up on a farm in a log cabin with 2 brothers and 5 sisters. His family was very poor, and the years during the Depression were very hard. He attended Rose Hill School until the age of 10, and then North Asheville and Ira B. Jones, finishing in the 11th grade. He did odd jobs until 1942, when he went into the service for 3 years, with eleven months in active duty. In 1949 he was called to serve in the Korean War and after 1 year was discharged. He used his G.I. Bill to go to Biltmore College, graduating in 1954. He got a job with the Post Office, delivering parcel post in the morning and mail in the afternoon for 20 years. He retired from 32 years of service with the Post Office on August 22, 1976, and died in July 2006.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Harley Ownbey, Grace Station PO, Lords drugstore, Eckards drugstore, local churches, Ira B Jones school, Amboy race track ; post office forms ; Asheville Speedway program ; clippings

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Richard and Anne Parham 

Interview Date and Interviewer

April 23, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Richard Parham discusses his experience growing up in Asheville, describing several important places in the city such as Pack Square, the Paramount Theatre, and various shops that he remembers. He discusses his work experience, his service in the military during WWII in the South Pacific and Japan, and his career in the weaving industry. He discusses changes that have occurred in Asheville over the years. Anne describes her experience growing up in the Montford area, and discusses the horrible conditions of poverty and sickness during the Depression. She discusses the Seely family, for whom she worked, and describes Seely's Castle. She also discusses her experience working in the weaving industry, where she met Richard, and outlines her job experience working as an LPN in the health industry.

Biography

Richard Parham was born in 1921 in Craggy, his family later moving to Broadway and then to Beaver Lake. He started school in West Buncombe, and then went to Claxton. His stepfather was a brick mason, and Richard did rock work around the Beaverdam area and also in Biltmore Forest. When he was 17 he worked in the weaving industry. He worked on the mixing machines with dye, washed the fabric and hung it on the fences outside to dry. He and other employees picked over the wool, washed it, and separated different colors. During the war he was sent to the South Pacific and then Japan. After service he worked in a machinery shop west of Asheville by the river. He also worked in a foundry putting ducts in the Northwestern Bank (now BBT Building in downtown Asheville). He worked with the Stencil Engineering Corporation for 20 years. Richard Parham died in 2002.

Anne Parham was born in Asheville, and grew up in the lower end of Montford. Her family was very poor, and although her mother wanted to send Anne to college, her father wouldn't allow it. During the summers Anne worked in Winston-Salem NC for Mrs. John M. Beard, the second daughter of Mrs. Seely. She later became a guide for the Biltmore Homespun Shop - where she met Richard. She was licensed as an LPN, and worked at St. Joseph's, the Health Department, and later at the Beaverdam Nursing Home. She died in 1999.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; transcript ; interview notes ; photographs of Richard and Anne Parham ; USFS Southern Research Station leaflet; Grovewood Gallery flyer ; clippings

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James Parker 

Interview Date and Interviewer

August 16, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

James Parker discusses his education, from grade school to college, where he eventually obtained a Ph.D. in physics. He describes his involvement with the Naval Reserve Laboratory, and outlines several research projects that he was involved in during the war years, which included studies of harbor protection, and later a study of the effects of static electricity on radio communication in airplanes. He discusses the effect of the war on industry, and describes changes that occurred in the city throughout this time. He describes his experience doing textile material research for Enka, and outlines changes that occurred in this field over time. He talks about his interest in gems and minerals, describing different minerals that are specific to this area, and outlining the history of mineral prospecting in this area over the years. He talks about the mica mines that became important during the Depression, and their effect on the Spruce Pine area. He discusses his children, their educations and occupations.

Biography

Parker attended the Orange Street School, which is now closed. He then went to David Millard, and Asheville School for Boys, graduating in 1936. He attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, graduating with a degree in physics. Later he went into the Naval Reserve Laboratory for 7 years, working first on harbor protection using cables under the water to detect magnetic fields generated by boats. During the war he worked in Washington as a blackout warden. He was later sent to Alaska to study the effects of static electricity on aircraft, which interfered with radio communication during thunderstorms. He was married on April 15, 1944 to an Asheville native who had been working as a draftsman for Ford Instruments. After the war he decided to go back to the University and get a Ph.D. in physics. He worked for Enka for 30 years after this, developing research to create textiles from petrochemicals and wood fibers. He retired in 1983, before the company was acquired by BASF.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of James Parker, his home, Mary Parker's home, the Boy Scouts office, and the mineral research lab ; leaflets from Colburn Gem & Mineral Museum, and Pack Place ; clippings ; audio cassette of talk at 25th anniversary of Colburn Gem & Mineral Museum

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Mary Parker 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 18, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Mary Parker describes her family home (the old Patton home) at 95 Charlotte Street. She describes the Montford area and Pearson Drive during her youth, and discusses the changes that occurred after the development of the Manor, Albemarle Park and Grove Park. She recalls the unpaved roads of Murdock Avenue and Kimberly Avenue, and other facets of life then. She discusses her education and her family. She discusses in detail Pack Memorial Library, describing political aspects of funding and how the Friends of the Library supported the library by paying for programs and materials not included in the budget. She also discusses the history of the Sondley Collection. Other topics she discusses include: the YWCA, the Pen and Plate Club, the Lindley Home for Unwed Mothers, the formation of local hospitals, the Polsky family, the Chamber Music Society, the library's circulating print collection, the library's newsletter Happenings, the Bele Chere street festival, the Rhododendron Festival with its Brigade of Guards, and the library trust fund.

Biography

Mary Parker was born in Asheville, and was raised in her present home at 95 Charlotte St., which is also known as the old Patton home. She attended a girls' school, the Grove Park School. She was an active member of the Friends of the Pack Memorial Library, remaining involved with the group for more than 40 years. She was president of the Friends' board of directors from 1954-58, and from 1984-85. She was also active in the Junior League. She was named an "Asheville Living Treasure" in 2011, and died in 2012, aged 97.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Mary Parker, her home, and Haywood Parker ; "Happenings", Pack Library newsletter ; clippings

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Kenneth Partin and Nancy Seymour 

Interview Dates and Interviewer

January 29, 1994 [Partin] and February 2, 1994 [Seymour] ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

The development of Thoms Rehabilitation Center is discussed by Kenneth Partin and Nancy Seymour. Partin describes his association with Thoms, for whom he worked in the printing business before the clinic was created. He talks about his daughter, who was born deaf, and discusses her development and education. Seymour discusses her son, who was having motor functioning problems, and how this led to her involvement with the rehabilitation center. She describes the role of the center in responding to the needs of children whose problems have been misunderstood. She discusses laws concerning the handicapped and the designation of government funds for the education of disabled children. She outlines the development of the hospital through the years, and discusses its involvement with the Junior League, the Rotary Club, the Crippled Children's Society, March of Dimes, and the county and state legislature. She describes how Thoms has changed the programs that it has offered over the years to fit the needs of the community, and she discusses its current focus on the elderly.

Biography

Partin came to Asheville as a salesman, and worked for Howard Thoms in the printing business. Thoms later became involved in orthopedics and, when Partin's daughter was born deaf, they built a clinic which is now Thoms Rehabilitation Center. Seymour came to Asheville in 1968. Her son was having motor functioning problems, and she took him to the Developmental Evaluation Center in Asheville. He was sent to Thoms and received physical and occupational therapy on the premises. She spent a great deal of time on the campus, and decided to volunteer. She later became Executive Director, where her major role was to raise money, in addition she directed volunteers, wrote grant proposals,and managed public relations.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Kenneth Partin, Nancy Seymour, and Thoms Rehabilitation Center ; Thoms Rehabilitation Hospital brochures and materials ; clippings

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Paul (Dusty) Pless, Jr. and Kathy Bowman 

Interview Dates and Interviewer

February 24, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Brother and sister discuss the Dreamland drive-in theatre opened in 1947 by their grandfather. They describe a thriving business with many attractions and concessions, but how the development of the VCR, more lights from the city, and walk-in theaters caused a decline in business, and the family enterprise evolved into a flea market. Business policies and tactics are discussed, and they describe damage done to the business from floods.

Biography

Both Dusty and Kathy were born in Asheville and attended T. C. Roberson School. In 1947 their grandfather decided to open a drive-in theatre and leased land which held more than 700 cars. The lot was packed every night and was the largest drive-in in the Southeast. When VCR's became popular people stayed at home, and the drive-in market dried up. The family added a flea market by day, and showed the movie at night, changing over to a complete flea market in 1990. They lost everything in the flood of 1977, and a flood in January of 1995 did a lot of damage that insurance won't cover.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Paul Pless, Kathy Bowman, Dreamland flea market, and teague used furniture ; clippings

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Lettie Polite 

Interview Date and Interviewer

September 8, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Lettie Polite discusses her educational background and the difficulty of finding a teaching job after college. She describes problems with students and other faculty members during the time of integration, as she continued her teaching career at David Millard Junior High School.

Biography

Polite was born in Asheville and grew up in Stumptown. She attended Hill Street School, Stephens-Lee High School and NC Central College where she got her BS and MLS. Upon returning to Asheville after living in NY, she became a certified librarian. She served on the board of the Asheville Catholic School, and has worked with many organizations in the Asheville area.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Lettie Polite and her home, Burton Street community center, Hill Street Baptist church ; clippings

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Margaret Poor 

Interview Date and Interviewer

January 8, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Margaret Poor describes the city and Pack Square when she was young. She talks about her education, and her experience starting a floral business with her husband. The shop, originally located on Patton Avenue in West Asheville, later moved to Haywood Road, its present location. She discusses changes in the florist business, including wire services, competition from other businesses, and the changing demands for different types of floral products over the years. She talks about collecting and selling antiques. She discusses West Asheville as a community and its relation to the center of Asheville, particularly in terms of daily life for her family when she was young. She describes changes in the city over the years, including descriptions of old buildings in the center of Asheville and in West Asheville. She has a large family of ten children, and mentions her many grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Biography

Margaret Poor was born in Asheville. She attended Eugene Rankin and Hall Fletcher schools. Her husband, who died in 1986, owned a landscaping business, but left this to open a florist business with Mrs. Poor. She began collecting antiques when her children were older, and has sold them both from the florist shop and in other types of sales. She studied china painting, and was a member of the Asheville Community Club.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photograph of Margaret Poor

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Margery Post 

Interview Date and Interviewer

August 30, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photograph ; text

Scope and Contents

Margery Post gives a brief history of her family, which moved to this area from England near the turn of the twentieth century. She describes her childhood impressions of Asheville, providing details about Pack Square, Riverside Park, the Palais Royal, the Grove Park Inn and Montford. She discusses her education and her childhood activities, chores, and amusements.

Biography

Post was born in England in1899, and she came to America at the age of 4. The family lived on Chestnut Street, and she attended Orange Street School. She graduated from high school in 1917. Her husband William E. Post worked for Post Machinery Company which manufactured iron and brass castings. After his death, Margery worked briefly for Culbertson Studio ["Portraits of Distinction"]. She died in 1997, at the age of 97.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Margery Post ; clippings

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Mother Margaret Potts 

Interview Date and Interviewer

July 28, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photograph ; text

Scope and Contents

The interview outlines the history of the Religious of Christian Education order from its beginning in 1817 following the French Revolution, and its relocation to Belgium. The founding of a school in Asheville in 1908 is described. Efforts to overcome anti-Catholic prejudice, and the enrollment of a large percentage of Jewish and Protestant students are discussed. Other aspects of the development of the school are described, including hard times during the Depression and World War II and changes during and after Vatican II. Mother Potts was part of the school faculty during the construction of several new buildings; the entire campus is now owned by A-B Technical Institute. The roles of parents, and of the school's "Mothers' Guild," are described. Memories of the 1929 bank failure in Asheville, the influx of physicians during and after World War II, and other events concerning Asheville's history are discussed. She describes her current teaching activities, correspondence with 500 former students, and a 1990 audience with Pope John Paul II.

Biography

Margaret Potts decided to take her vows at age 20, as a student at St. Genevieve of-the-Pines. She received her teaching degree by taking summer classes, and went to Tournai, Belgium to take her final vows in 1934. Mother Potts taught for many years at St. Genevieve's, and also served as Mother Superior of the school. A history of the school, created from her taped memories, was published in 1991. [Copies of the tapes have been added to this oral history file.] Margaret Potts died in 1999, aged 92.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photograph of Margaret Potts ; program and bookmark from the Smith-McDowell House ; clippings ; seven audio cassette tapes recorded by Margaret Potts, and used to create the book, "St. Genevieve's Remembered"

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Norma and Patrick Price 

Interview Date and Interviewer

March 1, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

The Prices discuss their involvements in the community since their arrival in Asheville in 1962. Patrick describes his experience serving on the school board for 10 years, and discusses several aspects of the school system, such as racial tensions from integration, the "latch key program," ROTC, bussing, guns, teacher pay and student motivation. He discusses political aspects of a proposed city-county school merger. Norma talks about her involvement with the city council and the Planning and Zoning board, describing issues such as annexation, water treatment and maintenance, redevelopment and historic preservation. She discusses changes that have occurred in the city due to redevelopment, and its current problems with traffic congestion.

Biography

Norma and Patrick Price moved to Asheville in 1962, and became very active in the community. Patrick served on the School Board from 1975 to 1985. Norma joined the Federation of Women's Clubs and became a volunteer, and later served on both the Asheville City Council and the Planning and Zoning Board. She studied at the Institute of Government in Raleigh, and was sent as the mayor's representative to the Land-of-Sky Regional Council.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Norma and Patrick Price ; "NewsBreak", March 1993 ; clippings

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Rainbow Mountain School 

Interview Date and Interviewer

September 13, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Talk regarding interviewing techniques by Dorothy Joynes to students of Rainbow Mountain School for research project on school history.

Additional Materials

Interview notes ; photographs of school, teachers, pupils, and Dorothy Joynes ; clippings

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Kostas and Emily Rantzos 

Interview Date and Interviewer

January 13, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Emily and Gus Rantzos describe their experience as members of the Greek community in Asheville. Gus discusses his education as a tailor's apprentice in Greece, his immigration to America, and the ways in which Emily helped him, as well as other Greek immigrants, to learn the language and go through all the formalities of getting settled. They discuss their marriage, her job working as a medical technician, and his job working as a tailor at The Man Store. He later opened his own shop called Kostas Men's Wear, and Kostas outlines changes in clothing stores and fashion over the years, and compares today's work ethic with that of people in Greece. They talk about their involvement in the Greek community, as well as their desire to expose their children to the Greek culture, and mention Greek groups in other cities that give strong support to the communities.

Biography

Emily Rantzos is a native of Asheville, active in the Greek Church, and started playing the organ when she was 12. She graduated from Lee Edwards High School, went to college, and came back to Asheville. Kostas, called Gus, was born in Greece, and worked as an apprentice to a tailor. He had relatives in New Jersey, and came to America in 1973. Emily helped him learn English. They were married, and Gus became an American citizen within 3 years. He started working at The Man Store, which was well known all over the area, as a tailor. Emily was a medical technician for 13 years, helping her husband in the evenings. They had two sons in 1976 and 1977. Gus opened his Kostas Men's Wear, which was originally on Charlotte Street, before moving to Battery Park Avenue. The store closed in 2008.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Kostas Menswear stores ; Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox church ; clippings

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Eleanor and Charles Rawls 

Interview Date and Interviewer

October 28, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Eleanor Rawls discusses her education and her experience designing furniture in High Point, NC. She also discusses her experience showing her watercolors, and her involvement with several artists' organizations. She describes the evolution of the Asheville Art Museum, and its board and auxiliary. She talks about her work with heraldry and genealogy; she has researched and painted over a thousand family crests. She talks about other related projects, and discusses her sons. Charles describes his education, and his experience working for a wholesale lumber company. He discusses the 1920's real estate market and the Depression, and shares his opinions about changes in the city, including the Interstate 240 open cut at Beaucatcher Mountain, and downtown development.

Biography

Eleanor Rawls was born in Lumberton, N.C., in 1916. She attended the New York School of Fine and Applied Arts, in New York City, and later designed furniture in High Point, N.C. Eleanor and Charles married in 1941 and they subsequently moved to Richmond, Virginia, and then to Asheville following World War II. She began showing watercolors locally in the mid-1950s, and extended her formal training for a period of time. Her work became widely known and was been included in many exhibitions and collections. She was an active member of several arts and artists' organizations. Charles Rawls' family came to Asheville beginning in 1880 [connected with the newly-built Swannanoa Hotel]. He was born in 1913, and graduated from UNC Chapel Hill and Harvard Business School. He worked for, and later owned, a wholesale lumber company. Charles Rawls died in 2000, and Eleanor Rawls died in 2010.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Eleanor and Charles Rawls, artwork by Eleanor Rawls, Asheville Art Museum ; resume of Eleanor Rawls ; biography of Charles Rawls ; clippings

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Jesse Ray Sr. 

Interview Date and Interviewer

December 9, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Jesse Ray talks about growing up in Asheville as one of thirteen children. He remembers going to school at the YMI and opening his business on Eagle Street in 1936. After WWII, Ray disinterred the remains of soldiers in England, Holland, Belgium and France and returned bodies to their families or reburied them in permanent cemeteries abroad. He describes changes in the YMI, redevelopment, integration, and changes in funeral services over the years, and he talks about the Depression years, water quality, and railway service.

Biography

Ray was born in Spartanburg, SC, May 12, 1911. When he was 4 months old, he moved to Asheville. He graduated from Stephens-Lee High School in 1924, and the Worsham College of Mortuary Science in 1932. After working for McCoy Undertaking, he opened his own funeral home in 1936. One of thirteen children, he had four children of his own. He was always active in civic affairs, and, in 1979, the mayor appointed him chairman of the redevelopment project. Jesse Ray died in August 1994.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Jesse Ray, Julia ray, and Ray's Funeral Home ; 1194 calendar from Ray's funeral home ; "Keeping the Promise, 50 years of the Housing Authority..." ; black history of Asheville ; clippings

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Milton Ready 

Interview Date and Interviewer

December 30, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Milton Ready discusses his interest in Western North Carolina, which prompted him to move to Asheville from Texas in 1972. He describes teaching in the History Department at UNCA, and discusses his efforts to introduce regional history and appreciation into the curriculum. He discusses the Southern Highlands Research Center, and the people who were central to its development. He talks about different minority groups in Asheville, and describes their involvement in the community. He also talks about the city's failure to overcome discrimination to promote education and business opportunities among minority groups. He feels that in the past 20 years, the "progressive consensus" that emerged in the late 60's regarding integration, job opportunities, cooperation between communities, the development of downtown Asheville, and cooperation with the YMI Cultural Center, has ended. He discusses the changes in resources, spending, and cultural interests that are brought about by the steady influx of older, middle to upper class people. He describes the tension that exists between the county and the city, over issues centered around class, race, ethnic background and economics, and the tension between West Asheville and North Asheville.

Biography

Ready graduated from the University of Houston and the University of Georgia, moving from Texas to Asheville with his wife in 1972. He taught at a Junior College in North Carolina, and was offered a position at UNCA. He had previously co-written a colonial history, and received awards for writing on Georgia history in the Georgia Historical Quarterly. When he arrived at UNCA he was surprised to find that there was no focus on local history. He spent the next 16 years encouraging an appreciation regional history and culture and the role Asheville plays in the 34 counties that comprise Western North Carolina. He also became the first director of the Jewish Studies Center at UNCA.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Milton ready ; clippings

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Helen Tarasov Reed 

Interview Dates and Interviewers

March 3, 1989 - Norma Snap ; November 27, 1992 - Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

In the 1989 recording, which was one of several for the AAUW as a project following a panel presentation of taping oral histories, Helen Reed talks about her background, how she got degree in international law, and moved to Asheville with her husband. She describes teaching in China, and mentions several outstanding local AAUW women.

In the 1992 recording, Reed revisits some of the topics from the earlier interview. She describes her parents' backgrounds and discusses her education. She describes her experience teaching languages and civics for 13 years at Asheville Country Day School, and her experience working as a freelance translator, and serving on the Buncombe County School Board. She describes the formation of the Unitarian Church from its earliest days, when she and her husband began to meet with other interested people. The church members met at various sites which she describes, purchased property on Vermont Avenue, and later built the present church on Charlotte Street in 1971-72.The membership soon doubled due to its increased visibility. The church has had ongoing relationships with various community groups, and has taken official positions on a number of issues. The various ministers of the church over the years are discussed. The activities of Unitarians in Asheville promoting integration during the 1950s and 60s are described. She describes the activities of her husband and children, including their activities in the church.

Biography

Helen Reed was born in 1915 in Toronto. She received a master's degree in international law and became fluent in several languages. Her husband, Haldee Reed, who died in 1972, was a dye chemist, and they moved to Asheville in 1946 when he was employed by the Enka Corporation. They had three children. She taught languages and civics for 13 years at Asheville Country Day School, and always worked as a free-lance translator. She taught advanced English courses in China from 1984 to 1986. She served as a translator in 1986, as a member of a Friendship group trip to Russia. She died about two months after the 1992 interview, in January, 1993.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photograph of Helen Reed ; clippings

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John Mackey Reynolds 

Interview Date and Interviewer

March 30, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; text

Scope and Contents

John Reynolds discusses his education and his involvement with schools, describing his experiences teaching high school, serving on a committee to study city and county consolidation, and serving on the board of Asheville-Biltmore College. He outlines the development of UNC Asheville, giving a history of the people involved in making the school what it is today. He discusses the school's struggle to obtain funds, and describes several different bond referendums that were central to moving forward. He describes the process of choosing the present location of the school, and the desire to make the school a 4-year college and a branch of the University of North Carolina,and how this was accomplished. He discusses the aesthetic development of the campus, describing placement of roads and buildings, and discusses specific people who contributed to this development. He talks about the problems inherent in county and city consolidation, which revolve around integration and discrimination. He also discusses changes that he has seen in the city over time: job scarcity, labor unions, transportation, industry, employment, farming, lumbering and mining.

Biography

Reynolds moved to Asheville in 1936. He attended Wofford College in Spartanburg, and taught high school at Haw Creek for one year. Later he worked in a shipyard, and spent 4 years in the Navy. Upon his return to Asheville, he decided to work with schools, and was elected to a committee to study city and county school consolidation in 1946. In 1956 he was asked by the chairman of the County Commissioners to be on the board of Asheville-Biltmore College, and he, along with his uncle A. C. Reynolds, became very active in the school's development. He was instrumental in obtaining a $500,000 bond for the school, raising other funds, and in deciding on the school's present location. He worked as a food broker, having taken over his wife's father's business, and ran it for 25 years. He sold the business in 1971, and managed real estate until interest rates became too high. Reynolds died in 1996, aged 79.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; clippings

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Thomas and Lillian Reynolds 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 9, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Tom Reynolds traces his family history back to the settlement of his great-grandfather in Bent Creek in 1797. He discusses his father's history and education, and his experience teaching at multiple levels, serving as assistant principal, and finally becoming the superintendent for Buncombe County Schools. He discusses his family's involvement with the development of Asheville-Biltmore College. He describes his own education, at Biltmore College, Harvard and MIT, his service in the Navy, and his experience teaching at both Biltmore College and Duke. He discusses the changes that he saw in Asheville upon his return from Duke. He talks about the different schools in the area and discusses their relationship to each other. Lillian describes her family history, their real estate business, and the attractions of Black Mountain.

Biography

Tom Reynolds was born in 1912, the youngest of nine children. After graduation he went to Biltmore College, and worked with his father there as an instructor. In 1942 he went into the Navy for radar engineering. He was sent to Harvard and MIT and then to Brazil. He taught at Duke for 2 years, got his PhD and taught for another 2 years. He was Director of Instruction of Buncombe County Schools for 4 years, and then went back to Duke to teach until 1971. His field was in math and science education, and he worked for one year with the math science education in Washington, and for 13 summers was director of summer institute for high school teachers at Duke.

Lillian Reynolds grew up in Candler, graduated from Biltmore College in 1935, and then went to UNC-Greensboro. She married Tom in 1942.They settled in Black Mountain when they returned from Duke.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Thomas and Lillian Reynolds ; clippings

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"The Rivers of the Carolinas" 

Recording Date

September 16, 1992

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; text

Scope and Contents

The recording is from the opening session of "Rivers of the Carolinas", a program sponsored by the NC Center for Creative Retirement at UNC Asheville. The recording was made by Dorothy Joynes as part of her Voices of Asheville series, and features speakers, author Wilma Dykeman, Milton Ready and John Morris from UNCA faculty, and Joan Moses from Warren Wilson College.

Additional Materials

Materials linked to the event ; clippings

Restrictions

Cannot be copied.

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Scott Rogers 

Interview Date and Interviewer

April 1, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Scott Rogers describes his work with juvenile delinquents, family counseling and the mentally ill, and talks about how this work experience led him in 1968 to his job as executive director of Asheville-Buncombe Community Christian Ministry (ABCCM). He discusses the crisis created in the care of the mentally ill when programs and institutions were cut under the Regan and Bush administrations. He describes the connections between several important organizations that help the poor, including ABCCM, the Salvation Army, the United Way, and the participation of various religious centers,including the Christian, Jewish, Bah'ai and Quaker communities. He discusses homeless shelters and half-way houses, and describes three different levels of homelessness. He discusses many other needs of the poor,including medical care, and how they are addressed in the city. He talks about the importance of volunteers, as well as special events which raise funds and focus on community needs. He discusses the detrimental effect of drugs on families and communities.

Biography

Rogers came to Asheville in response to an ad for a minister with his particular qualifications to head the struggling ABCCM. Since the age of 15, he wanted to be involved in full-time Christian work, serving people directly. He attended Lincoln Christian College and Seminary. He and his wife became house parents for a juvenile girl's home while he preached on weekends in a country church. For 4 ½ years he practiced family counseling in a Lutheran agency, and became involved in politics with the restructuring of aid to the mentally ill that came about during the Regan administration. In Asheville, he became very active in the community, working with several organizations to help the poor, the homeless, the mentally ill, juvenile delinquents, and families in crisis because of a member in jail. His wife, Shirley, served as the director of volunteers for social services.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Scott Roger ; clippings

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James Roosseau 

Interview Date and Interviewer

August 7, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

James Roosseau discusses his experience as a tattoo artist with his own shop in Asheville, called the Ink Pot. He describes different types of customers and the different types of tattoos that they generally want. He discusses laws that regulate his business. He describes techniques for tattoo removal, and his efforts to talk people out of getting tattoos that they will later regret. He discusses his interest in motorcycles, describing his Harley that he built from the ground up. He describes Harley rallies, and how they have changed over the years.

Biography

Roosseau was born in West Palm Beach, and grew up in Daytona. After getting a tattoo, he decided to become a tattoo artist and moved to Asheville. He opened a tattoo shop called the Ink Pot, at 631 Merrimon Ave, Asheville.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of James Roosseau, his shop, "Honda Hoot" 1995, Stricks Cycle shop ; clippings

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Carolyn Rosenthal 

Interview Date and Interviewer

September 29, 1992 ; Sylvia Robin

Format

Audio cassette tape ; text

Scope and Contents

Carolyn Rosenthal discusses her attraction to Asheville, and her involvement with the Center for Creative Retirement, the YWCA, the Jewish Community Center, and the College for Seniors. She describes creative movement, writing groups, dance performances, and encouraging others to value their dreams. She talks about the Civil Rights Movement, the Vietnam War, the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and the McCarthy hearings. She discusses her marriage to a Jew who escaped from Nazi Germany, and describes the mystical aspects of Judaism

Biography

Carolyn Rosenthal moved to Asheville in 1988 because of her desire to live in the country, and her love of the mountains. She became involved with the Center for Creative Retirement for the off-campus humanities program, as well as the YWCA, the Jewish Community Center, and the College for Seniors.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; clippings

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Florence Ryan and Nanine Iddings 

Interview Dates and Interviewers

April 9, 1989 - Alice Weed ; June 18, 1992, June 23 1992, and June 30, 1992 - Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; copy CDs ; photographs and negatives ; text

Scope and Contents

Consists of two separate interviews. The first, recorded in April 1989 for an AAUW history project, begins with Nanine Iddings describing her childhood, and moving with her family from Nebraska to Asheville in 1929.. She describes her father's and brother's business activities, and her own career in teaching, including her political causes, and activities with the AAUW. Florence Ryan outlines her early years in Nebraska, and her choice to attend Bryn Mawr College. She describes working for several public welfare agencies, as well as her political and social welfare activities.

in the second interview, from 1992, Florence Ryan talks about the women's suffrage movement during her college years, her family, and her life in Asheville. She mentions the development of Biltmore Forest, Kenilworth, and Beaver Lake, city streets, stores, and transportation, city festivals, and the Depression. She describes her work with the League of Women Voters, and the Community Relations Council, and the visit to Asheville by Eleanor Roosevelt. She talks about the awards she has received, and discusses the Florence Ryan Education Fund of the Asheville/Buncombe League of Women Voters.

Biography

Nanine Iddings moved to Edwin Place from Nebraska with her mother in 1920. She graduated from teacher's college and joined the AAUW in 1926.Over the course of her service in AAUW, she became state treasurer, vice president for two terms, and president, in charge of local programs and membership. She has worked in education, teaching kindergarten to 6th grades in the Catholic boy's high school, and also at Asheville Country Day School. Her sister, Florence Ryan, was a divorced mother and political activist. Florence joined AAUW in 1948. She had been with Red Cross as social worker and transferred to the Veteran's Administration Hospital. In her political activities she was concerned with abortion and birth control, child guidance, civil rights, social security, public welfare, and sterilization. She was active in the community long after her retirement.

Florence Ryan died in 1994, and Nanine Iddings died in 1998.

Additional Materials

Abstract [1989] ; abstract [1992] ; interview notes ; photographs of Florence Ryan and her family [used in library exhibit, March 1994] ; League of Women Voters pamphlets ; clippings

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Mary Sancrant 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 10, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Mary Sancrant discusses her first job as a waitress in the patient dining room of the tuberculosis sanitarium in Oteen. She goes on to describe working as a waitress in the dining room of the Grove Park Inn, talking about the illegal serving of liquor, separation between black and white employees, and describing the interior decor of the Plantation Room. She discusses the changes that she saw in the Inn after leaving and coming back twenty years later. She describes various other experiences in more than forty years as a waitress and her experience running a steak house franchise with her husband. She discusses various aspects of the restaurant business, and makes observations about customers.

Biography

Sancrant began working as a waitress at age sixteen, at the patient dining room in the tuberculosis sanitarium in Oteen. She worked at the Grove Park Inn dining room and at other area restaurants, including the Coach House in Black Mountain, and Buck's, the first drive-in on Tunnel Road. She managed a grocery store in Franklin with her first husband, and a steak house franchise with her second husband.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; Photographs of Mary Sancrant and Carla Haller ; Grove Park Inn brochure ; clippings

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Hilda Burrell Sands 

Interview Date and Interviewer

March 12, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Hilda Sands discusses her family history, and her experience growing up in rural Madison County, where her father sharecropped a farm in addition to his own. She describes working in the fields, and discusses the harsh effects of the Depression. She discusses visits to Asheville in her youth, describing the S&W Cafeteria, Whites Homburg Shop, Goode's Drug Store and the theaters - Imperial, Plaza, Paramount, and State. She discusses her previous and present employments.

Biography

Sands' father was from Asheville, and her mother from Madison County. They met while working at the cotton mill, and they continued to work there for three years after their marriage. Their daughter Hilda was born in Jupiter in 1926, and because of poverty moved back to Madison County where her father rented a house, and sharecropped one farm as well as his own. Hilda's parents had very little education, and she felt lucky to finish high school. She worked in the fields every summer, but after graduation she went to work at Enka, where she stayed for 2 ½ years. She worked for the phone switchboard, the Grove Park Inn, the Weaverville Drug Store and Bon Marché. She then went to work as an inspector for Mills Manufacturing Co., which makes parachutes, bags, and harnesses for the government. Hilda Sands died in 2007.

Additional Materials

Abstract : interview notes ; photographs of Hilda Sands and Rob Neufeld, Asheville Cotton Mill, 174 W. Haywood, Mills Manufacturing ; materials from the Preservation Society of Asheville ; clippings

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Michael Sargent 

Interview Date and Interviewer

April 23, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Michael Sargent discusses his experience being in the Army during the Vietnam war, and the attitudes of the public toward soldiers during this time. He discusses integration and its effects in schools., and describes his education in the culinary arts, and his job working in several Ingles grocery stores. He discusses the need for the government to become involved in providing viable alternatives to tobacco farmers, and discusses drug use in this area. He describes his involvement in raising funds for the Eliada Home, and describes his desire to be the spokesman for the National Cancer Society.

Biography

Sargent was born in Asheville but spent youth with grandparents in Tennessee. On their death 1965, he returned to Asheville, volunteered for the army and was shipped to Germany. At 18 he was ordered to Vietnam but called back at last minute. At first he thought about pursuing a psychology degree, but decided instead to go to A-B Tech culinary school. He worked as assistant food service director for Campbell University in Raleigh. His wife worked in an outreach program as a social worker until funds were cut. They returned to Asheville, and he worked at the Shrimp Boat Restaurant in Westgate, which was just opening in 1988. He got a job at the Ingles at Woodland Hills when it first opened, later moving to the store in Oteen and then in Enka, before becoming the head of the fish department of the store on Merrimon Avenue.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Michael Sargent, and Ingles supermarket ; clippings

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John Q. Schell 

Interview Date and Interviewer

October 15, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

John Schell discusses the history of the Newton School and the Steven's Family Trust and the Community Foundation of Western North Carolina. He discusses the Newton Cemetery, which was started in 1818 on part of the property now administered by the Steven's Family Trust. He describes the function of the Community Foundation, and its affiliation with other organizations throughout the nation. He discusses the Land-of-Sky Regional Council, the Junior League, United Way, the French Broad River Foundation, Rotary Club and Civitan, all of which are involved with the Community Foundation on some level. He describes the various methods for establishing a foundation. He discusses his experience working for The Citizen Times, his involvement with the school board, the Community Foundation, and with the Resource Center for Foundations. He discusses integration in the schools, and its effects on the schools.

Biography

John Schell was born in Asheville in 1922. He attended the Murray Hill School until it was condemned, and then the Newton School until 5th grade. He transferred to Aycock School when his family moved to West Asheville. After graduation he served as a pilot in the Pacific Theatre in WWII and, on his release in 1946, he married and went to work in the accounting department of the Citizen Times. He continued to work for the paper, and was General Manager when he retired in 1987. During his time with the paper he was involved with the Chamber of Commerce and the United Way and served for 11 years on the Asheville School Board. After his retirement he was offered a part-time job with the Community Foundation, and he served for 3 years. He served on the board, and started the Resource Center for Foundations, making information available on what organizations might have money for projects, where the money comes from, where it goes and assistance in writing grants. John Schell died in November 2009, aged 87.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of John Schell, and Newton Academy ; materials from the Community Foundation of WNC ; clippings

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Patty Schleicher 

Interview Date and Interviewer

January 1, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Patty Schleicher discusses her move to Asheville from Texas, and describes the Newfound School that her daughter attended. She discusses the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild, which she and her husband joined in 1980, and describes the process of marbling, and how she developed her techniques over the years. She discusses the beginning of the craft movement which was an economic lifesaver for the mountain people during hard times but also preserved the crafts and cultures. She discusses Mrs. George Vanderbilt's involvement in furthering the mountain crafts. She describes the efforts that are being made to keep the arts alive in the city. She discusses the development of downtown, and its role as the city's cultural and artistic center.

Biography

Patty and her husband married in 1945, and honeymooned in Asheville. They spent the majority of their married life on the gulf of Texas, where her husband worked in petrochemicals. In 1973 she moved to Asheville with her daughter Mimi, and her husband followed soon after. She worked as a librarian in Weaverville so that she could pay for her daughter to attend the Newfound School, an alternative school from which she graduated in 1975. She and her husband both wanted to join the Southern Highlands Handicraft Guild, and she became interested in marbling. They were accepted into the guild in 1980, and she became the first marbler to join, and she served on the standards committee, judging entries. She opened her own shop to sell her crafts, and she worked to create publicity and interest in the local art of the area.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Patty Schleicher, her shop "Inklings", Earth Guild in Asheville, Newfound School ; brochures and publicity materials ; clippings

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Katharine Bynum Shepard 

Interview Dates and Interviewers

June 22 1989, Norma Snap ; September 18 1992, Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Consists of two interviews.

The first [1989] interview was done as part of a project of the American Association of University Women in Asheville, and Katherine Shepard discusses her education and her parents' interest in community organizations, and she describes projects in which her mother and friends were involved. She talks about her involvement with the AAUW and Girl Scouts and discusses several aspects of her family history, the development of the VA Hospital in Oteen, the effects of the depression, the construction of the tunnel, court house and city hall. She lists organizations in which her parents were active.

The second [1992] interview initially goes over some topics already covered in the first interview. Shepard discusses her education and her involvement with the Girl Scouts. She describes her work with Junior League projects, and the AAUW. She was president of the AAUW in Aurora, Illinois, for two years, and a fellowship was given in her name. Her father owned a dairy business, and she describes dairying, Valkerie Farms, Hans Pondoppidan (also known as Hans Broby), and the connection between the local milk supply and the Veterans Administration Hospital in Oteen outside Asheville. She discusses her father's involvement with the Sinking Fund in the 1930s, and other aspects of city finances both then and during later periods. Her father's membership in other organizations is also discussed. The construction of the family's Norman-style house on Macon Avenue is described, along with the subsequent building of the Longchamps Apartments. Various aspects of tuberculosis treatment and local sanitariums are discussed. She describes the tenure of her great-grandfather, William Preston Bynum, as Chief Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court, and discusses her grandfather, William Shipp Bynum, who was rector of Calvary Episcopal Church in Fletcher, N.C. Her father was the author of a book titled, Destiny, and the Curtis Bynum Memorial Collection at the UNC Asheville library was established in his name.

Biography

Katharine Shepard attended school on Charlotte Street [in a building which later became the Jewish Community Center until its demolition in February 1993], St. Genevieve's, and Asheville High School. She became interested in scouting while at summer camp in Brevard, and worked with a troop in Asheville for three summers. She started a scout group again in 1931, when she returned from college, and maintained a life-long interest in the Girl Scouts. She was in the court of the Rhododendron Festival, and joined the Junior League and the American Association of University Women (AAUW) in September 1931. After her marriage in 1939, she moved to Aurora, Illinois, where she was president of the AAUW, for two years, and a fellowship was given in her name. She returned to Asheville in 1983, and moved to Charlotte in 1993. She died in 2008.

Additional Materials

Abstract [of 1989 interview] ; transcript [of 1992 interview] ; interview notes ; photographs of Katharine Shepard, Bynum residence, "sign in" at Sherrills Inn, and Girl Scout building ; "Pisgah Profile" Girl Scout newsletter, 1992 ; clippings

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Robert E. Shepherd 

Interview Date and Interviewer

January 8, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Robert Shepherd discusses his experience as executive director of Land-of-Sky Regional Council. The Council covers Buncombe, Henderson, Madison, and Transylvania counties and, with funding from governmental and private sources, coordinates technical assistance, studies and grants for issues related to economic development and human and natural resources. Much of the interview consists of his discussion of specific programs. These include: TVA plans for dams on the French Broad River and establishing public access points along the river ; assistance to the aging ; housing, local government annexation and planning ; coordination of recycling, waste management, and clean air and water projects ; and issues involved with the I-26 corridor north of Asheville. He describes how the Council works with tourism groups and economic promotion programs, and assists with applications for state and federal funds, and has worked with government, business, and independent groups concerned with the water quality and general use of the French Broad river.

Biography

Robert Shepherd, a North Carolina native, graduated from North Carolina State University in Economics Research. He became executive director of the Land-of-Sky Regional Council in 1973, functioning as a liaison to the state and federal governments for the four counties covered by the Council. He held the position until he retired in 2002.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Robert Shepherd ; Land-of-Sky regional Council information pack ; clippings

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Booker T. Sherrill 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 27, 1995 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Booker T. Mr. Sherrill talks about the difficulty finding work in Asheville during the Depression. He describes the differences in clientele among the major hotels such as the Langren, Battery Park, Vanderbilt, and the Grove Park Inn. He mentions working for Jesse Ray after the Battery Park Hotel closed. He talks about his relocation due to urban renewal, and living in the Battery Park, a building he worked in for many years.

Biography

Born Sept. 1, 1907, in Hickory, NC., Sherrill lived with his mother until 1920, then came to Asheville to live with his father. After two years of college, he went to work as a bellman and worked in hotels for over 40 years. He later worked for Jesse ray's funeral service. He was an active member of the Berry Temple United Methodist Church for 60 years, and he died at the age of 96, on Sunday, October 26, 2003.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Booker T. Sherrill, and Doris Brewer ; clippings

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O. L. Sherrill 

Interview Date and Interviewer

August 25, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photograph ; text

Scope and Contents

O. L. Sherrill describes Eagle St. as the focus of social life prior to integration, with the YMI Drug Store at the center. He talks about working in the education system, and Asheville High School, where he was co-principal. He recalls changes in attitudes, and discusses integration and the increase in drug use.

Biography

Otha L. Sherrill was born in Statesville, NC. He was a teacher and coach for many years, then he became assistant principal at South French Broad Middle School. Later, he was principal of Randolph Elementary for 4 years, and Hall Fletcher for 1 year, before becoming co-principal at Asheville High School. He retired in 1989 and, in 2015, was named an "Asheville Living Treasure".

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photograph ; "Building Bridges" newsletter ' clippings

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Phyllis Jones Sherrill 

Interview Date and Interviewer

April 8, 1993 ; Sylvia Robin

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; text

Scope and Contents

Phyllis Sherrill describes her role as a human relations specialist for the Asheville-Buncombe Community Relations Council, and outlines the council's history and mission. She talks about racial disturbances and hate crimes, as well as problems in area schools. Segregation in schools is discussed, as well as the status of minorities in Asheville. She describes growing up in Stumptown, and mentions games of basketball, horseshoes, and other neighborhood recreation, as well as changes to the neighborhood. She talks about working with the YWCA, and describes integration of the YWCA in the 1970s, and the closing of the Grove Street YWCA, which was protested by white members.

Biography

Phyllis Sherrill's parents had roots in Brevard and Anderson, South Carolina, and her paternal great-grandmother was Cherokee. She grew up in Stumptown, Asheville, and was always an active volunteer in the community. She worked 15 years as the assistant teen director for the YWCA, and served as a human relations specialist for the Asheville-Buncombe Community Relations Council. Phyllis Sherrill died in 2001.

Additional Materials

Abstract : transcript ; interview notes ; leaflets ; clippings

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Louis D. Silveri 

Interview Date and Interviewer

March 22, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Louis Silveri describes his interest in the history of the Appalachian region, and discusses his experience recording oral histories during the 1970's for the Southern Highlands Research Center of the University of North Carolina at Asheville. He discusses his procedures, describes the equipment that he used, and gives a brief description of many of the interviews. He describes changes that he has observed in Asheville since he first began spending summers there. He discusses the Appalachian Consortium, the NC Coalition of Liberal Democrats, and other subjects covered in his interviews. He discusses his plans for the future of his research.

Biography

Louis Silveri grew up in Brockton, MA. He was a Korean War veteran and, after the war, he pursued a Master's Degree in American History at Georgetown University, Washington, D.C. and followed that with a Doctorate in American History from St. John's University, N.Y. While on sabbatical from Assumption College in Worcester, MA in 1972, Dr. Louis Silveri decided to give his family the experience of living in another part of the country. He obtained a teaching job at the University of North Carolina Asheville and moved with his wife and children to a house in Haw Creek in Buncombe County. He was interested in doing research on the effect of the New Deal on this part of the country. After reading "These Are Our Lives," oral histories collected by the Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration, he decided to interview people in the Asheville area. His interviews, recorded during the 1970's, formed the nucleus of the oral history collection of the Southern Highlands Research Center. At UNC Asheville, he taught courses on 20th century American history, U.S. diplomacy and the Civil War. Dr. Silveri died on November 3, 2004 in Holden, MA, aged 73. At the time of his death, he was still on the faculty at Assumption College where he had taught for nearly 35 years.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photograph of Louis Silveri, and 16 Colonial Place ; resume and list of publications ; clippings

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Oralene Simmons 

Interview Date and Interviewer

April 15, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Oralene Simmons, the first Black student at Mars Hill College, talks about working for racial equality through participating in sit-ins at lunch counters. She talks at length about working with the Montford community, the community centers sponsored by Asheville Parks and Recreation, and about the redevelopment of East Riverside. She discusses the Martin Luther King Prayer Breakfasts, that she instigated.

Biography

The great grandfather of Simmons, a slave who was once owned by a trustee of Mars Hill College, was used as collateral against a debt owed by the College. In 1961, Oralene became the first African American to be admitted to Mars Hill, but it was not without a struggle. When she was director of the Montford Community Center, she initiated the Martin Luther King birthday breakfast celebrations, which subsequently became an annual event, and was instrumental in getting NC legislators to pass the State Holiday Bill. She served as director of the YMI for three years, before retiring in 2002.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Oralene Simmons, Asheville parks, Montford Community Center, William Randolph Elementary School, and the MLK statue ; program for 1993, Martin Luther King Prayer Breakfast ; clippings ; audio recording of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial dedication, April 13, 1996

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Mary Elizabeth Robinson Sligh 

Interview Date and Interviewer

September 14, 1993 ; Sylvia Robin

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDS ; text

Scope and Contents

Mary Sligh talks about the discrimination against her mother, who was a registered nurse. She describes Asheville before and after integration, and talks about her three brothers, her education, her parents' jobs, and her dream of becoming a nurse. She mentions her husband Gilbert Sligh, who was one of the first Black policemen in Asheville. She shares her values as well as her hopes for the world.

Biography

Sligh was born June 12, 1918 in Hendersonville, NC, and moved to Asheville at age 13. She had four children and worked as an aide at Mission Hospital. She was owner of Sligh's Beauty Shop, at 4 Pine Grove Avenue, and also worked as attendance counselor in the school system. Mary Sligh died in October 2013, aged 95.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes

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Charles Sluder and Tammy Taylor Gaddy 

Interview Date and Interviewer

March 31, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Charles Sluder discusses his experience growing up on a farm in Alexander, and describes various aspects of subsistence farming, as well as life without electricity and running water. He talks about the effects of the government's control of tobacco prices and growth. He discusses his experience working for CP&L, and describes various aspects of life during the depression and prohibition. Sluder's granddaughter, Tammy Gaddy, describes performing with several singing groups, and discusses her interest in the history of this area.

Biography

Charles Sluder grew up in Alexander, where his family owned a subsistence farm and sold their extra produce. He was raised without money, electricity or running water, and his father started growing tobacco when he was a boy. He played baseball in high school, and after graduation went to work for CP&L. Tammy Gaddy's parents owned cattle farm nearby, and was involved in several singing groups with them.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Charles Sluder, Tammy Gaddy, and a farm ; "IBEW Journal" ; Asheville Citizen-Times supplement about March 1993 snow ; clippings ; audio recording of "The Followers"

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Harold Sluder 

Interview Date and Interviewer

August 26, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Harold Sluder describes his education, and talks about the Presbyterian school, whose teachers were sent from the Asheville Normal and Teachers College. The teachers lived at the Dula Springs Hotel during its winter closing. The hotel and its history are described. He discusses school and social life; meeting his wife; military service; and employment with the postal service and the weather bureau in Asheville. Life in Dual Springs and Weaverville is described, along with various historical event, including the Depression, the World War II era, changes in utilities and transportation, and a local bank robbery. The history of Brittain's Cove Presbyterian Church is discussed, and how it was a "home mission" of the Northern Presbyterian Church, was located near the school, and how before its founding, members attended the Reems Creek church. In the 1940s the church changed affiliation to the Southern Presbyterian division, and Mr. Sluder was made an elder in 1949, at age 28. A new church building was constructed in the 1960s, and the church is now self-sufficient. He considers the construction of the new building to be a highlight of his life.

Biography

Sluder's family moved to Dula Springs from Asheville when he was two years old. His grade school education was in Weaverville for the first grade, and then the nearby Presbyterian school, with teachers sent from the Asheville Normal and Teachers College. He graduated from Weaverville High School in 1939. After army service of 4 years in the Coast Guard, he married in 1946, and worked as a postal accountant. Later he worked in the Federal Building, in the Weather Department, before retiring in 1979.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Brittain's Cove presbyterian church, and gravestones ; clippings

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Robert "Bob" Smith 

Interview Date and Interviewer

December 1, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Robert Smith talks about problems arising from integration. including loss of neighborhoods, schools, and buying power. He is concerned with difficulty in recruiting black teachers. He tells why urban renewal was bittersweet and discusses at length the YMI, life in Asheville for African-Americans, and problems of the welfare system as well as his remedies.

Biography

Smith was born Nov 28, 1952 in Asheville, NC. Even though isolated and poor while growing up, he didn't know it because of cohesive community. He attended St. Anthony's, a colored mission school, and the Asheville Catholic High School. He worked with various civic groups, including Group Home Director, and Federal Compliance Community Organization. He became Director of the Community Relations Council in 1983.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs ; Asheville-Buncombe Community Relations Council reports and leaflets ; clippings

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Albert, Alan, Ray and Jay Sorrells 

Interview Date and Interviewer

June 8, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Four members of the Sorrells family of Skyland, NC, talk about their youth in rural Buncombe County. They describe the two room Rose Hill School, and community life during the Depression, centering around church and school. All four men served in the armed forces during World War II. They describe the many different kinds of work they have done over the years (fireman, deputy sheriff, riveter, trucker, radio and TV repairman, factory worker, railroad worker, etc.) in order to earn a living for their families.

Biography

Alan Sorrells went to Rose Hill School until the 4th grade, and then went to Oakley School. He was in the 4th Marine division during WWII, and married while in the service. By writing a 1,000 word essay he was given a high school diploma, and used his G.I. bill to train in radio and TV repair. He also worked for the Southern Railroad until being laid off. He worked briefly for American Enka and then became a riveter for Dave Steel. He died in 2001, aged 76.

Albert was born into a family of ten, and five of the boys served in WWII in the Navy. Before his Naval service, he worked in the Biltmore Bleacheries, and afterwards he worked at Ivey's Department Store, and at an Esso Station. He then went to work for the tax office, and later became chief deputy for three years. For 16 years he was land agent for Carolina Power and Light, and he retired in 1968. He died in July 2016, aged 88.

Jay attended Rose Hill School for 6 years. He served in the Navy with his twin brother Ray, until brothers were split up because five Sullivan brothers were killed on the USS Juno. He served a total of 5 years, and after the war he worked at Oteen until 1957, when he resigned, and worked for Eastern Water Co. for 3-4 years, and then Thrash Refrigeration. He worked for Overnight Transportation Trucking Co. (Sweeten Creek Rd) but was fired. He then worked for McLean Trucking Co. from 1981, until it went out of business. He died in 2008, at the age of 85.

Ray, was the twin brother of Jay,and started Rose Hill School in 1929 and stayed until it closed down. He went to Oakley School, and served in the Navy. He married in 1946 and worked for the Oteen fire department after six months with Carolina Power and Light. A son was born in 1949 and daughter in 1959. He retired in 1976 at 52, when the fire department was contracted out to the city. He died in 2003, aged 80.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs ; clippings

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Wanda Stanard 

Interview Date and Interviewer

April 3, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Wanda Stanard describes her first visit to Asheville in 1913, when she came to visit her sister who was being treated for tuberculosis. She describes Asheville at that time, and talks about the Bon Marché store, the Battery Park Hotel, Riverside Park, Pack Square, Sunset Mountain, Charlotte Street, and Merrimon Avenue. She describes the Biltmore House, Biltmore Village, and Montford Avenue. She also discusses conditions at the Veterans Hospital, and how it improved over the years, becoming a famous sanatorium for tuberculosis patients. She describes her experience with the Reconstruction Army Service, which she joined in 1918 as an aide. She outlines her husband's education, military and diplomatic service, and career as a journalist. She outlines their move to Asheville in 1930, and her experience working as a secretary at the Veterans Hospital in Oteen. She also describes her involvement with the St. Martha's Guild rummage sale of St. Mary's Episcopal Church in Asheville, and with the Children's Welfare League, which was organized in 1924 to aid children in orphanages.

Biography

Wanda Stanard was born in 1892, and first saw Asheville on a visit to her sister and brother-in-law in 1913. They were living in Asheville during her sister's tuberculosis treatment. After that visit, she joined the Reconstruction Army Service in 1918 as an aide, and was stationed in Washington, D.C. from 1922-1930 at Walter Reed Hospital. During this time, she attended a White House reception for the Prince of Wales given by President Coolidge. While in Washington, she met and married Hugh Stanard, who was a graduate of the University of Virginia, and Georgetown University Law School. He joined the diplomatic service, volunteered for the British military, and was a First Lieutenant in the US Army. He later wrote for National Geographic magazine, and was a reporter for a Roanoke, Virginia newspaper. After his dismissal for health reasons, they came to Asheville in 1930, where he received treatment for tuberculosis. He was chief editorial writer for the Asheville Citizen-Times for four years. She worked as a secretary at the Veterans Hospital in Oteen. She also was chairperson of the St. Martha's Guild rummage sale of St. Mary's Episcopal Church in Asheville. For two years, she was chairperson of the Children's Welfare League, which was organized in 1924 to aid children in orphanages. At the time of this interview Wanda Stanard was 101 and in frail health. She died in November 1994, at the age of 102.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Wanda Stanard ; funeral service for Wanda Stanard ; clippings

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O. E. (Oscar Edwin) Starnes, Jr. 

Interview Date and Interviewer

August 3, 1994 ; Dorothy Starnes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Starnes describes his idyllic boyhood in West Asheville, and his pastimes during junior high and high school. He talks about his experiences during World War II, and how, after the war, he returned to school to finish his law degree. He describes his work in the field of civil law, including work for the city of Asheville and for the town of Biltmore Forest. He shares memories of the political life of Asheville, and describes his unsuccessful race for a seat in the NC House of Representatives.

Biography

O E Starnes was born in 1924, and moved to Asheville as a boy, when his father was transferred to head the Imperial Life Insurance Company. He studied law at UNC Chapel Hill, and eventually became a senior partner with the law firm of Harkins, Walton and VanWinkle. He specialized in the area of civil law, such as liability cases and workers compensation. After an unsuccessful bid for a seat in the NC House, he was hired as corporation council on retainer for the city of Asheville, and later became lawyer for the town of Biltmore Forest.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Starnes and St. Joan of Arc church ; brochure for Van Winkle, Buck, Wall, Starnes and Davis, PA ; clippings

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Eleanor Waddell Stephens 

Interview Date and Interviewer

October 18, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

One of the first residents of Biltmore Forest, Eleanor Stephens grew up with the Biltmore Estate as her front yard. She gives many details of her daily life in the 1910's and 1920's. She describes her education at St. Genevieve's and talks about her work at the Asheville Citizen after graduation from college. She talks about her husband George Stevens, who also worked for the newspaper and later became a printer and publisher. She describes how in 1936 several families with young children worked together to found the Asheville Country Day School.

Biography

Stephens grew up in Biltmore Village, where her father George Waddell was consulting engineer for the Biltmore Estate. She graduated from St. Genevieve's and was one of the ladies of the court in the first Rhododendron Festival. Her father-in-law, a native of Charlotte, bought the Biltmore Village from Mrs. Vanderbilt and developed it with a friend from Charlotte. With Charles Webb, he was coowner of the Asheville Citizen. Both Eleanor Waddell and her future husband, publisher George M. Stevens, worked for the newspaper. They were part of a group of involved parents who founded the Asheville Day School.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Eleanor Stephens, and Biltmore Avenue ; clippings

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Imogene (Cissie) Radeker Stevens 

Interview Date and Interviewer

November 17, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Cissie Stevens talks about her family, her husband's family and the Stevens Family Trust, a scholarship fund administered by the Community Foundation of Western North Carolina. She describes how her volunteer work gave her leadership experience which led to employment with Planned Parenthood and then with Leadership Asheville. She explains the programs for which she is responsible in her position as director of the College for Seniors in the Center for Creative Retirement at the University of North Carolina Asheville.

Biography

Stevens was born in Washington, DC and spent her childhood in Washington, in Asheville, NC (where her father was administrator of Norburn Hospital), and in Cincinnati. She returned to Asheville at the age of 20. She and her lawyer husband Jack have three sons, and while her children were young, she did volunteer work, including a term as president of the Junior League. After a part-time job as Health Educator for Planned Parenthood, she became involved with Leadership Asheville and helped to establish similar programs in Madison and Transylvania Counties, Hendersonville, and Brevard. After working with Leadership Asheville Seniors, she became director of College for Seniors in the UNCA Center for Creative Retirement.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Cissie Stevens, and Planned Parenthood building ; Center for Creative Retirement materials ; clippings

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Marion Stivers 

Interview Date and Interviewer

December 29, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photocopied photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Marion Stivers describes how she, her husband David Williams, and their two children, moved to Asheville in 1960, living in apartments when they first arrived, before buying a large home. She talks about going to Western Carolina University in 1968 to get a counseling degree, and subsequently working as a guidance counselor at Erwin High School. She discussed her experiences at the school, and the general state of the educational system, both locally and nationally. Not long after they arrived in Asheville, Marion and her husband joined the Unitarian Church, and have remained active in the church. Marion talks about serving on the church board, the construction of the new church building, the ministers, and the congregation's social concerns and activities. She discusses her views on politics and downtown development

Biography

Marion Stivers moved to Asheville in 1960 with her husband, David Williams, and their two children. They later had a third child. They bought the O. D. Revel estate on Lookout Rd., from which they ran a Bed and Breakfast. In 1968, she went back to school and earned a counseling degree from Western Carolina University. Her first job as a guidance counselor was at Erwin High School. She retired from Enka High School in 1989, and served on the board of the Unitarian Church. She died in September 1996, aged 72.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photocopied photographs ; flyer for Bridle Path Inn ; clippings of obituaries

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Bob Terrell 

Interview Date and Interviewer

April 12, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Bob Terrell discusses his education and his interest in journalism. He describes his experience working for the Sylva Herald and the Asheville Citizen Times, where he was sports editor for 18 years. He discusses changes in the media over time. and describes his experience touring with Billy Graham, and writing books about the crusades. He describes his other writing which includes books of anecdotes and humor, biographies, and western novels. He discusses various sports teams in the area, and their history through the years. He discusses integration in sports, talks about his travels, and describes numerous trips to the Holy Land, where he has acted as a tour guide for over 700 people.

Biography

Terrell was born in Sylva, NC, in 1928. He attended Western Carolina University for four years, changed his major, and started writing for the Sylva Herald. On March 18, 1949 he joined the Asheville Citizen-Times as sports editor. He covered sports for 18 years and also wrote columns of general interest. During the Korean War he joined the infantry but was sent to Fort Ord, CA, to do paperwork. He left working for the paper full-time in 1986, and started to undertake contract work. He had started writing books and, by agreement with the paper, worked with Billy Graham for three years, traveling with him and writing books that were given away at the crusades. He decided to write western novels, in addition to writing a weekly column for the paper, and working on a magazine section for "D-Day" anniversary (WWII). He led many Church trips to the Holy Land. Bob Terrell died in 2009, aged 80.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs ; audio recording of "Humor Fellowship", April 1994 ; clippings

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Mitzi Schaden Tessier 

Interview Date and Interviewer

November 4, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Mitzi Tessier discusses her move to Asheville with her husband and two children in 1953. She discusses the effect that the Depression had on the city. She describes her involvement with the Girl Scouts. She discusses clogging and big circle dancing, and describes her involvement as a sponsor of the square dance team of which her son was a member. She describes her experience teaching scouting, dancing and ceramics, as well as teaching students with learning disabilities at Erwin High School. She talks about the development of the Urban Trail, the Southern Highlands Handicraft Guild, and describes various other aspects of the arts and crafts of the area. She discusses Asheville's appeal for retirees. She refers to the Preservation Society and the Western North Carolina Historical Association, and describes her process of gathering information for her books about the history of the area.

Biography

Tessier came to Asheville with her husband Jack and two children in May, 1953. Jack worked with Sears Roebuck, while she was involved with St. Paul's Methodist Church and the PTA. She became a field advisor for all Buncombe County for the Pisgah Girl Scout Council, and taught at Erwin High School, working with students with learning difficulties. During this time she was asked to sponsor the square dance team. As enthusiasm for dancing grew, she traveled with the teams all over the country. She became involved with the development of the Urban Trail, editing and reducing the information contained on the various plaques that were set up all over downtown. She published 2 books, "Asheville, a Pictorial History" [1982], and, "The State of Buncombe" [1992].

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Mitzi Tessier, Mama T's in the Park, and the downtown Welcome Center ; tourist brochures ; AC-T supplement "Buncombe County 200 Anniversary", study guide on white racism ; clippings

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Col. Alfred J. Thomas and Sgt. Charles Fisher 

Interview Date and Interviewer

August 1, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Al Thomas and Charles Fisher are instructors in the ROTC program at Asheville High School in Asheville, NC. They discuss the ideals of the program and what they hope to accomplish by encouraging hard work and discipline in Asheville high school students. They talk about how the ROTC program functions and about their interactions with the students.

Biography

Charles Fisher grew up in Asheville and joined the Marines in 1954. After 12 years, he began working with the ROTC program, first in New Orleans, and then he moved to Asheville High School in 1976. He died in 2008.

Alfred Fisher was a 33 years veteran of the Marines, and was the Senior Marine Instructor for the ROTC program at Asheville High School from when it began in 1975, until he retired in 1996. He died in 2005, aged 83.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs ; materials about Asheville High School ROTC ; clippings

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O. T. Tomes and Tyrone Greenlee 

Interview Date and Interviewer

May 2, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

O T Tomes and Tyrone Greenlee, respectively pastor and administrative assistant at New Mt. Olive Baptist Church, talk about the history of the church, construction of the new church building, and their roles at the church. Tomes describes the congregation, and his holistic approach to the ministry, whilst Greenlee talks about outreach, and his work with youth programs. Both discuss race relations, and programs to reach across racial lines.

Biography

When he retired in 1992, O T Tomes had been pastor at the church for nearly thirty years. In addition, he has served on Asheville City council, as well as many civic boards, and was a founding member of "Building Bridges" program, that sought to cross racial barriers.

Born and raised in Asheville, Tyrone Greenlee served as administrative assistant at New Mount Olive Missionary Church, and was part of the "Building Bridges" program.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of O T Tomes, Tyrone Greenless, and New Mt. Olive Baptist Church ; church newsletter ; clippings

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Lynn Troutner and Kathleen Balogh 

Interview Date and Interviewer

October 12, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Lynn Troutner and Kathleen Balogh talk about the YWCA Women's Center. Troutner describes her role as coordinator of adolescent health services at the YWCA. and among the topics she covers are, fund raising, the "Mother Love" and other programs, the YWCA "Booster" club, and membership of the board. Balogh explains the role of the Junior League in founding the Health Center, and she talks about the Center's programs, along with the history of the merger of the black and white YWCAs. She also mentions racism, intolerance, and the educational system.

Biography

At the time of the interview, Lynn Troutner was coordinator of adolescent health services at the YWCA, working with teenage pregnancies at the Women's Center. Kathleen Balogh had served as a member of the YWCA board of directors for seven years, before becoming Director of Community Services.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs ; YWCA rules, program, and newsletter ; clippings

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Nick and Anastacia (Anne) Tsiros 

Interview Date and Interviewer

January 24, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Nick Tsiros describes his experience moving to the US from Greece in 1952. Anne talks about her education in the Greek language, and her experience teaching the language and dances in the Greek Community Center and the public school system. They discuss the solidarity of the Greek Community, and its civic involvement with group like the League of Women Voters, Asheville Art Museum, Shriners, and the Democratic Party. They describe their experiences of prejudice, and growing up as foreigners, and they talk about the differences between the Roman Catholic and the Greek Orthodox Church, various aspects of Greek culture and tradition, and their personal beliefs.

Biography

Nick Tsiros was born in Greece, and came to the US in 1952 when he was 18 years old. He owned and operated several successful restaurants, and his sons joined him in the restaurant business. Anne learned Greek at home and taught the language and dancing for years in the Greek Community Center as well as the public school system. For many years she worked as an elementary school teacher in the Asheville public schools. She and Nick have two sons, and active members of the Greek Church and community.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Nick and Anne Tsiros, and Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church ; clippings

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Herbert Turner 

Interview Date and Interviewer

November 19, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Herbert Turner discusses his introduction to the Baha'i faith. He describes the history and development of the faith, and several of its central beliefs. He talks about the accessibility of the Baha'i faith to all types of people from all religions, and describes some of the racial tensions that were caused by accepting Blacks into their meetings. He describes the group's social and economic projects, as well as the group's views on several controversial subjects, and his own personal beliefs.

Biography

Turner was born in 1925 in Ridgecrest, NC, McDowell County. He went to school in Black Mountain, Birmingham and Knoxville. He joined the Navy, and after military service he worked for three years as a medical technician. He was brought up as a Baptist, but later began to study other religions. After hearing a radio announcement, he met and spoke with Dr. Bill Tucker, who introduced him and his family to the Baha'i faith. After he and his wife joined the meetings, the group became a local spiritual assembly, meeting in private homes.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Herbert Turner, the Baha'i Center, and diagram of the Adamic-Baha'i cycle ; "Thief in the Night", by William Sears ; material about the Baha'i faith ; clippings

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John P. VanAlstyne 

Interview Dates and Interviewer

July 1 1992, July 8 1992, and July 15 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; copy CDs ; text

Scope and Contents

John VanAlstyne describes his childhood in Kinderhook, NY, giving details about his family, daily life, the town, transportation and utilities. He describes the Depression and the work of the W.P.A., and talks about his social and school activities, including his means of financing his education. He discusses his experiences during World War II and his career as a college professor. He describes his contributions to the growth of Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, MA., and his activities since retirement, including his move to Asheville, and his volunteer work with the UNCA Center for Creative Retirement. He concludes with his personal impressions of Asheville.

Biography

VanAlstyne was born in Kinderhook, NY. He attended Hamilton College, and Princeton and Columbia Universities. During World War II he taught military and civilian students. While in New York City he married, worked in a bank, and then taught at Hamilton College in Clinton, NY. He later taught at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, MA and helped organize the Association of University Professors. After retirement he moved to Asheville, where he became active in the Center for Creative Retirement at UNCA, and volunteered five days a week in the College for Seniors.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; "Point of Light", NC Center for Creative Retirement newsletter ; photocopy of article from "Parade" magazine

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Susan Walton 

Interview Date and Interviewer

April 24, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Susan Walton discusses her religious upbringing, and describes her search for at religious community home. She discusses her interest and involvement in the Unitarian Church. She describes the need for more spirituality in the church, as well as a freer, warmer, more flexible environment. She discusses the development of the UU Church in Asheville, which she joined when she moved here in 1977, and describes some of the problems faced by the congregation over the years. She discusses the Church's involvement with social issues, and describes her activities in the community. She describes her education and her involvement with the Housing Authority and the Hillcrest Housing Project where she teaches women life and employment skills. She discusses the proliferation of hate groups and race-motivated events.

Biography

Susan Walton was born in Holden, MA, outside Worcester. She was raised as an Episcopalian, but felt that it wasn't right for her. She tried several other religions on her own, none of which she liked until she attended the Unitarian Church. In 1977 her husband, who was chairman of family practice at the University of MA Medical School, needed to move to a warmer climate, so they moved to Asheville where he became Director of Family Practice Residency Program. She joined the UU Church here, and became involved in the community, with social projects such as the Amnesty International Art Show, the Hunger Awareness bread sale, and the Central America Resource Center and the Human Rights Festival. She went back to school to study criminal justice at A-B Tech, and graduated as a psychology major. She then took a year off and went to Haywood Tech to get a horticultural degree. She drew up a plan for the Housing Authority for a job-training program in Hillcrest. A one-year grant was obtained for job training and she worked in Hillcrest with about 25 women ages 30-40, teaching life skills and employment skills.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs ; "Pride" materials ; clippings

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Jean and Robert Webb 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 28, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Jean Webb recounts the story of her ancestor, Samuel Davidson, first white settler in Buncombe County, and how her family later occupied five homes on Pearson Drive in Asheville. The Webb's describe their school life in Asheville and social life during and after the Depression. Robert Webb discusses the simple pleasures they enjoyed then, and describes how downtown Asheville and the city's business climate has changed since he joined his father's insurance business. Jean describes the purpose and programs of Quality Forward, such as tree-planting and "Let's Can It," an anti-litter campaign. She discusses her term as chairwoman of the RiverLink board, a group concerned with the French Broad riverfront. She discusses other city parks and riverfront projects, such as the greenway near the Amboy Road Bridge on the west bank of the river. Robert discusses the sign ordinance and tree-planting projects in the city, which were spurred by architect Anthony Lord, and are now a Quality Forward activity. He discusses his activities with the Junior Chamber of Commerce, the Mountain Youth Jamboree, the Asheville Housing Authority and the Asheville Redevelopment Commission. He talks about his alma mater, Asheville School, from its founding in 1900 by two Cleveland educators, until its transition to a four-year, co-ed boarding school.

Biography

The families of both Jean and Robert Webb have historical roots in Asheville. Jean Webb is a descendent of the Davidson and Alexander families, who came to Buncombe County from Virginia in the late 1700's. Robert Webb's grandfather, attorney Charles A. Webb, moved to Asheville from Warren County in eastern NC. He served in the state Senate and was a US Marshal. In 1916, he bought the Asheville Gazette-News, which became the Asheville Citizen. Robert grew up in Montford and attended the Asheville School for Boys, later becoming a member of the school's Board of Trustees. Jean Webb attended the former Montford Avenue School, which is now William Randolph School. She continued her education at Asheville Country Day School, where her mother taught, and then at Lee Edwards High School, now Asheville High School. In college, she majored in history at UNC-Greensboro, then finished at UNC-Chapel Hill. After finishing college at UNC Chapel Hill, Mr. Webb joined the Navy ROTC and was sent to Korea for two years to sweep for mines. The couple married during Mr. Webb's last year in the service. After military service, Mr. Webb joined his father's insurance business, the R. Stanford Webb Agency. Mrs. Webb became involved with the Junior League and the First Presbyterian Church. The couple had four children. When her oldest son was 15, Mrs. Webb began working with Quality Forward, a nonprofit environmental organization that organizes beautification projects in Buncombe County. She became chair of the board of RiverLink. The Jean Webb River Park was dedicated to her during her chairmanship of the French Broad River Foundation. Robert Webb died in 2013.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Robert and Jean Webb, and Webb Insurance ; "Murder in Montford", by Sarah Upchurch ; materials from RiverLink and Quality Forward ; A C-T supplement, "Buncombe County 200 Anniversary" ; clippings

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Stefan Weir 

Interview Dates and Interviewer

August 29, 1994 and July 2, 1996 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; photograph ; text

Scope and Contents

The history consists of two interviews, conducted two years apart. The audio for the first half of the first interview has been lost, but the recording notes exist. In the first interview Stefan Weir, who was 17 at the time, described moving from Austin, Texas to Asheville when he was seven years old. He gives his impressions of Asheville, and talks about being a student at Asheville High School, and the lack of job opportunities in Asheville. he describes his ambition to study journalism, and outlines his attitude to alcohol and smoking.

In the second interview, from 1996, Weir once again covers moving from Texas, but goes on to talk about the jobs he had since graduating high school, and his interest in criminal justice. In this regard, he talks about crime in Asheville, and the role of the police. He describes his ambitions, attitude to racial issues, his relationship with people he was at school with, and his social scene.

Biography

Stefan Weir was 17 years old during the first interview, and attending Asheville High School. By the time of the second interview two years later, he worked as a typesetter and a food server for Fudruckers Restaurant, and hoped to go to university. Weir won 1st place in NC Scholastic Press Association awards, and was editor of the Asheville High Cougar Chronicle.

Additional Materials

Interview notes ; photographs of Stefan Weir, his mother and sister, and businesses and entertainment in Asheville ; "Be Here Now" newspaper ; clippings

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Alice White 

Interview Date and Interviewer

December 13, 1993 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photograph ;text

Scope and Contents

Alice White discusses her move to Asheville in 1982 and her interest in the redevelopment of downtown. She describes her involvement with the Haywood Street Redevelopment project, and the problems created by the growth of shopping malls, and their effects on local downtown merchants. She discusses historical preservation, her work with the Chamber of Commerce leasing space to merchants and vendors, and Asheville as a cultural center. She describes the disastrous effects that industries are having on Asheville's water supply and talks about the widening of Broadway, and the need for better sidewalks and lighting in the historic district in Montford.

Biography

In 1982 Alice White moved to Asheville where, through an interest in the development of downtown, she got involved with the Haywood Street redevelopment project. She was general manager for more than two years, working closely with the Chamber of Commerce, and often brought people to town who were looking for manufacturing space in the country. She was employed in Parks and Recreation until 1986, when she became involved with the Downtown Development Association, which strove to market central Asheville more successfully.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; transcript ; interview notes ; photograph of Haywood Park building ; Bele Chere '91 program ; downtown Asheville newsletter ; flyer for "The Chocolate Fetish", and copies of business cards for Asheville businesses ; clippings

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Shirley and Alfred J. Whitesides Jr. 

Interview Date and Interviewer

September 11, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Shirley and Al Whitesides discuss the Civil Rights movement and the changing face of racism. Shirley talks about her activities with the Delta House, while Al outlines his work with the Jaycees. They describe being volunteers with the YMI Cultural Center and with the YWCA, and discuss volunteer burnout. Shirley describes problems in the public schools created by student drug use, gang activity and lack of respect for teachers.

Biography

Al Whitesides was born in Asheville, and joined ASCORE (Asheville Student Committee on Racial Equality) while he was a student at Stephens-Lee High School. He went to Morehouse College in Atlanta, then graduated from NC Central in Durham. He served in the naval reserve and became vice president at the First Union Bank. Shirley, from Rocky Mount, NC, taught art in Asheville schools, and was one of the primary members of the Delta sorority to purchase the Delta House. Both have significant involvement in civic activities in Asheville.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Shirley & Al Whitesides, their home, and Delta House ; photocopies of photographs ; leaflets from First Union Bank and the Black Business Professional League ; program for Goombay '92 ; "Line of Evolution", African American crafts ; clippings

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William Williams 

Interview Date and Interviewer

February 26, 1996 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

William Williams describes his experience growing up in Oakley, which was semirural during his youth. He describes the congestion that has been caused by the development of the Asheville Mall, River Ridge and South Buncombe High School, and discusses community efforts to revitalize the area. He talks about his experience working as a teacher and principal in Swannanoa, as well as his experience serving as a member of the Buncombe County School Board. He discusses the state of education and the demand for teachers, changes in education and in family structure over the years, and federal programs for disadvantaged students. There is a brief outline of the history of the Swannanoa community, and he outlines sources of conflict between the city and county schools, including taxes, zoning, bussing, which prevent them from merging successfully. He discusses the effects of integration.

Biography

Williams was born and lived in Oakley. After graduating from Appalachian Teacher's College, he was hired immediately as a teacher in Swannanoa, where he taught for 8 years, before deciding to move into administration. He left the school in Swannanoa for 6 years, and returned to be principal for 17 years. After he retired as principal, he was asked to run for election to the County School Board.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of William Williams, schools, libraries, correctional and rehabilitation centers, the veteran's cemetery, Beacon Manufacturing, and community centers ; clippings

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Sister Kathleen Winters 

Interview Date and Interviewer

August 7, 1992 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

The interview includes information concerning the teaching of black students, both before and after legal integration of public schools. Other efforts by the schools to overcome prejudice are discussed. Observations are made concerning school staffing and changes in religious life over the years. Winters discusses the early history of the school's purchase in 1912 of the Victoria Inn (also previously known as the Oakland Heights Hotel), and the building used for Gibbons Hall School in 1949, is discussed. The latter section of the interview begins with Sister Winters reading a blessing she gave when St. Genevieve's closed (typescript enclosed). She then provides a description of Catholic school facilities including Asheville Catholic High School, "Glen Eden," a camp in Skyland, Madonna Hall, and the Smith-McDowell house. The purchase of the Smith-McDowell house in 1947 by the Franciscans, subsequent occupants, and details of the house and grounds are described. The St. Francis School for Boys is discussed. The school garden is also described.

Biography

Sister Winters was born in 1911 in County Galway, Ireland, and joined the order of the Religious of Christian Education in Tournai, Belgium, at age 19. She taught grammar school at St. Genevieve-of-the Pines from 1933-1945, was transferred to Waltham, MA for 5 years, and was principal of St. Genevieve's Grammar School from 1950-56. In the following years she taught at Asheville Catholic High School, schools in South Carolina and Ireland, and St. Eugene's School and Carolina Day School in Asheville. She died in April, 2001.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs of Sister Winters, and St. Eugene's Catholic School ; clippings

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Mary Ellen Wolcott 

Interview Dates and interviewer

August 24, 1994 and September 2, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tapes ; copy CDs ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Mary Ellen Wolcott was interviewed twice by Dorothy Joynes. Wolcott though the first (8/24/94) interview disjointed and asked for a second interview. Although tapes from both interviews are included, the following notes refer specifically to the second (9/2/94) interview.

Wolcott describes her experience growing up in West Asheville, and discusses the effects of the Depression on the area. She discusses Asheville as it was in her youth, describing downtown, Montford, Kimberly Ave., and the area around Beaucatcher Mountain before the tunnel was cut. The train service, and the changes in lifestyle that were caused by its elimination, as are the effects of World War II, and the involvement of women in the community. Wolcott discusses her experience working for the Asheville Citizen-Times during and after the war, and she also discusses the Vietnam War as a watershed event in the country's history. She describes changes that she has seen in society over time, and talks about her husband and children, and gives a brief outline of their lives.

Biography

Mary Wolcott was born in South Carolina in 1919, but grew up in West Asheville during the Depression and, although the effects of the Depression were devastating, her father's employment with the Post Office gave the family security. She married Billy Wolcott in 1942, when he had a weekend pass from Fort Bragg. After he returned to service overseas, she went back home to live with her parents, and returned to her job as society editor at the newspaper, and volunteering at the hospital after work. After the war she stayed at home with her two children for 15 years, returning to her job at the paper to cover a temporary maternity leave. She returned to the paper as Women's Editor, retiring in 1992. Billy, after graduating as an engineer from VMI, managed his sister Grace Koun's livestock yard. He then became associate City Manager for the City of Asheville, involved in many major city projects. He died in 1999. Mary Wolcott died in 2013.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; recording notes ; photographs of Mary and Billy Wolcott, their home, the City of Asheville Wolcott Building, Civic Center parking plaque, the Accelerated Learning Center, and the Village Gift shop ; clippings. Also included are materials from a reception honoring Billy Wolcott on 2/16/1995. These include, an audio recording, photographs, and clippings

Restrictions

September 2, 1994 tape cannot be copied. [No release on file.]

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Richard A. Wood, Jr. 

Interview Date and Interviewer

August 12, 1994 ; Dorothy Joynes

Format

Audio cassette tape ; copy CD ; photographs ; text

Scope and Contents

Richard Wood talks about his term as mayor from 1972-1975. He describes the history and development of the Civic Center, and discusses how the public was divided over its function and location. He describes the Model City Program, and how it funded the community centers in Montford and East Riverside. The conflicts that existed between the county and the city during the 1960's are outlined, and Wood describes their mutual participation in the airport commission and Pack Library during his term.

Biography

Richard Wood moved to Asheville with his family in 1943 when he was 5 years old. His father worked with the Forestry Office for the TVA in the Jackson Building, and they lived in Kenilworth. Richard attended Newton, David Millard and Lee Edwards High School, and was a cheerleader during his junior and senior year of high school, along with Ken Michalove, who worked for the city with Richard for years. A lawyer by profession, Wood was mayor from 1972-1975, and was often called the "baby mayor." During his term, he handled the development of the Civic Center, Pack Library and the airport commission, which incorporated the participation of both the city and the county. Wood died in 2011, aged 73.

Additional Materials

Abstract ; interview notes ; photographs ; clippings

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